Sunday, October 29, 2017

Community Safety Sexism Misandry "Top cop, watchdog call for end to workplace taunts against women" Herald Sun October 23, 2017 “Call out the joke; for example, say: ‘What did you mean by that comment?’” the report recommends. "When will we ever be able to call out ridiculing women? They say rumour can end with the simple question Why are you telling me this? Is entrenched prejudice towards masculinity sexist? Honestly if law-abiding males aren't up to snuff your attitudes are unreasonable and unreasoning." Pete Dowe



Is entrenched prejudice towards masculinity sexist?

“Call out the joke; for example, say: ‘What did you mean by that comment?’” the report recommends.
When will we ever be able to call out ridiculing women? 

There is nothing worse than an unaccountable bully with the status of "always victim always vulnerable"

They say rumour can end with the simple question Why are you telling me this? https://youtu.be/gzpkb99c52I


#genderpolitics #genderequality Doing a Feminist's bidding is weakminded, not a champion. Feminist bullying would not exist without weakminded masculine support.
Men have to learn to say NO to feminists.
The binary roles of males as defined by / allowed by #feminism are 'Potential perpetrator' or ''Vigilante tool of a female's bullying'
#feminists criticise men who keep their office door open when meeting with female colleagues. Criticise married men for protecting themselves from temptation and from spurious complaints. Feminists call the 'open door' policy #rapeculture
Why should guys have to avoid the #rumour mill? Avoid women behaving badly? which is much harder to do because we don't hold females to account nor see #femaleaggression as also wrong and rumour is much more malevolent than a wolf whistle
Will female aggression be held to account? Cruelty Insults disguised as jokes Rumour
Colouring the perception of someone else
#Misandry
#CovertBullying
Also limiting every speaker in meetings to two minutes stifles the guys and doesn't encourage the girls to speak. I had to steel myself to speak in meetings and public speaking os meetings helped my confidence. I wonder if meetings are the best place to address confidence and assertive training?

Pete Dowe




Top cop, watchdog call for end to workplace taunts against women



BOSSES are being urged to usher in a workplace revolution to stamp out everyday sexism, which a landmark report says is still undermining and victimising women.
A report, by a group of high-­powered male executives working with federal Sex Discrimination Commissioner Kate Jenkins, challenges Australia’s bosses to crack down on crude, cruel and thoughtless acts.
It says employers should not laugh at sexist jokes, should speak up when men speak over women, and should stop discussion of appearances.
The report finds everyday sexism mainly affects women, but men can also suffer.
It takes six main forms:
INSULTS disguised as jokes;
DEVALUING women’s views;
ASSUMPTIONS about carers;
LABELLING based on gender;
ROLE stereotyping; and
A PREOCCUPATION with physical appearance.
Victoria Police Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton, who is a member of the executives’ group Male Champions of Change, said everyday sexism was a sensitive issue for many people.
“Most people don’t want to be accused, let alone guilty, of sexist behaviour, while some often dismiss the subject as political correctness gone mad,” Mr Ashton said.




Graham Ashton said everyday sexism was a sensitive issue for many people. Picture: Tim Carrafa

“Yet we see it play out every single day.”
Mr Ashton said: “What we learned is that underlying or ‘everyday’ sexism affects women and men and — whether intentional or not — it can take a significant and cumulative toll on the personal lives and career progression of employees, and also the effectiveness of organisations.”
The Male Champions of Change are more than 100 heads of some of Australia’s largest organisations such as Qantas, the Ten Network, the federal police, Crown Resorts, the army, the AFL and Telstra.
The report, We Set the Tone: Eliminating Everyday Sexism, finds its cumulative effect can be extremely damaging: “It’s rarely raised, as it is often considered the little things — too small to make a fuss about, or for fear of damaging reputations or relationships”.
Everyday sexism is defined as “little things, said or done in a moment, often not ill-intended, that play into stereotypes of gender and assumptions about the roles of men and women at work and in our community”.
Examples include women being told to wear low-cut tops when meeting clients, being called “love”, and being expected to unwrap sandwiches at meetings. Men are told to “man up” or criticised if they want to collect their children.




Tara Moss. Picture Kym Smith
Peta Credlin.
High-profile women including Foreign Affairs Minister Julie Bishop, journalist Tracey Spicer, new New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Adern, novelist Tara Moss and former political staffer Peta Credlin have recently spoken out about such behaviour.
The report says everyday sexism isn’t merely “political correctness gone mad” and “this common response … has become one of the most significant barriers to tackling it”.
“In a work context, it plays out at crucial decision points affecting progress and careers, influencing who to appoint, develop, sponsor, reward or promote,” the report says.
Strategies to fight it, listed in the report, include respecting women’s voices in meetings, expecting women and men to share office cleaning and administrative tasks equally, and enabling men to share parenting roles.




The AFLW is helping to overcome the male domination of football, Gillon McLachlan said. Picture: Getty

In relation to jokes, bosses are being urged not to “validate humour that is explicitly or implicitly sexist or offensive by laughing, staying silent, or making excuses”.
“Call out the joke; for example, say: ‘What did you mean by that comment?’” the report recommends.
Ms Jenkins said people often didn’t want to raise these matters “because it can be seen as too small to make a fuss about and few want to be seen to be ‘rocking the boat’”.
“Unless we tackle (it) the most innovative policies and initiatives designed to advance gender equality and inclusive and effective organisations will not deliver the change we need,” she said.
AFL CEO Gillon McLachlan said the establishment of the women’s league was a way to overcome male domination of football.
“For so long, social norms and tradition have indicated that it’s a male-only game, ­effectively excluding half the potential playing population,” he said.
“There was no reason not to establish a women’s league and, since its launch, the AFLW has exceeded our competition, commercial and community expectations.”




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