Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Cycling Safety Cycling Safely Helmets City crash rider says helmet saved his life PerthNow September 5, 2017


“You see a lot, especially young people, cycling without a helmet and I say, ‘Look son, I’ve had an accident, you should be wearing a helmet’,” he said.
“They usually abuse you and cycle away.”



The University of NSW study presented to an injury prevention conference in Finland showed helmets reduced fatal head injuries by about 65 per cent.

"...before and after helmet laws, and we found there was no change in the number of people cycling," 

Dr Jake Olivier
774 ABC 22/9/16




The dogma of the goal to increase cycling participation by 
“making it easier for people to take up riding” or the focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation” 
is that it dictates we must have unsafe cycling or people won’t cycle.
So for instance unsafe helmet-less cycling has been put forward by the 
Freestyle Cycling Campaign as a means of boosting participation.
If one finds the helmet requirement can be deemed too onerous,
one wonders which other cyclists’ responsibilities could not be deemed a prohibitive disincentive
to “making it easier for people to take up riding”? or the focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation” 
a set of Bike lights?
Fundamental road safety measures
such as risk reduction behaviour,
and the responsibility to show a duty of care to one’s own safety as well as to other road users
can also be deemed a disincentive to
“making it easier for people to take up riding” or the focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation” 
The Freestyle Cycling campaign also deems the requirement to wear a helmet a disincentive to cycling participation because it reminds people of the risks of death, truncation of life and serious injury.
Remaining ignorant as to the risks involved in cycling has therefore also been put forward as a 
means of “making it easier for people to take up riding” or the focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation”

Pete Dowe








Cyclist's safety message


City crash rider says helmet saved his life

A CYCLIST who was critically injured after being knocked off his bike in the CBD says his helmet saved his life.
Duncan Askquith Ellis was rushed to hospital on Monday after his bike collided with a truck around 5am.
Mr Ellis was turning from Riverside Drive onto Plain Street when he was hit by the truck’s side mirror.
The impact of the crash caused the 61-year-old to go over the handlebars before he slammed into the kerb, cracking his helmet.



Cyclist Duncan Askquith Ellis is shown the extent of his injuries. Picture:Seven News.


Mr Ellis suffered a broken back and leg and bleeding on the brain in the crash.
He’s since had surgery to put a pin in his leg, and doctors have said it’s likely he’ll be in a neck brace for at least three weeks.
Speaking to 7 News after what was his second accident while riding his bike, Mr Ellis said wearing a helmet is crucial.
“You see a lot, especially young people, cycling without a helmet and I say, ‘Look son, I’ve had an accident, you should be wearing a helmet’,” he said.



Emergency services at the crash scene. Picture: Seven News.



“They usually abuse you and cycle away.”
The truck driver in Monday’s crash is assisting police with the investigation



http://www.perthnow.com.au/news/city-crash-rider-says-helmet-saved-his-life/news-story/aff92208440cd3041f20410752698e37?utm_source=emarsys&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=%2C+PerthNow+PM+update+5%2F9%2F17

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