Thursday, November 24, 2016

Community Safety Murder Female Aggression "Bonnie Sawyer-Thompson a Morwell woman who has pleaded guilty to the now abolished charge of defensive homicide did not have reasonable grounds to believe her family was in danger" Justice system has 'failed', sister of victim says abc.net.au/news/ Nov 17th 2016



"A Morwell woman who has pleaded guilty to the now abolished charge of defensive homicide did not have reasonable grounds to believe her family was in danger, a prosecutor has told a Victorian court."

"In an interview with police, Sawyer-Thompson said someone had told her to kill Mr Nankervis, but the court was told it was unclear who that person was."

"With the axe I hit him in the head and there's blood and I covered him up and I told him how sorry I was and I went blank in the head. It was like doing something but it wasn't me doing it," Sawyer-Thompson told police.

Justice system has 'failed', sister of victim says
The defensive homicide offence was abolished in Victoria in November 2014, just five months after Mr Nankervis' death.
In a victim impact statement read to the court, Mr Nankervis' sister Kathleen said she had lost faith in the justice system.
"It failed Jack. The case used a lucky loophole and the system ran with it," she said.
Defensive homicide carries a maximum penalty of 20 years imprisonment.
The hearing continues.
Morwell woman accused of 2014 defensive homicide feared for family, court hears
ABC GIPPSLAND KELLIE LAZZAROUPDATED THU NOV 17 19:11:04 EST 2016
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A group of more than 40 people at Latrobe Valley Law Courts
PHOTO 
A group of victim Jack Nankervis' friends and family wear green ribbons in his memory.
ABC GIPPSLAND: KELLIE LAZZARO
A Morwell woman who has pleaded guilty to the now abolished charge of defensive homicide did not have reasonable grounds to believe her family was in danger, a prosecutor has told a Victorian court.
On June 20, 2014, Bonnie Sawyer-Thompson struck Jack Nankervis, of Morwell, 70 times with a mattock and knife, killing him almost instantly.
Sawyer-Thompson was originally charged with the murder of Mr Nankervis, but that charge was dropped shortly after pre-trial rulings, and the jury was discharged.
Before the Victorian Supreme Court, sitting at Morwell, prosecutor Campbell Thomson, in his opening address, said Sawyer-Thompson, 22, killed Mr Nankervis believing it was necessary to defend her family from serious injury and death, but that she did not have reasonable grounds to have that belief.
In an interview with police, Sawyer-Thompson said someone had told her to kill Mr Nankervis, but the court was told it was unclear who that person was.
"With the axe I hit him in the head and there's blood and I covered him up and I told him how sorry I was and I went blank in the head. It was like doing something but it wasn't me doing it," Sawyer-Thompson told police.
Jack Nankervis holding lifting weights
Mr Thomson said it was unclear who, if anyone, told her to do it.
Mr Nankervis, 23, was asleep in bed, fully-clothed, and under the influence of alcohol and drugs, when he was attacked sometime between 4.50pm and 5.40pm.
The court heard Mr Nankervis, Sawyer-Thompson and her abusive then-boyfriend Phil Mifsud, had been drinking alcohol and taking ice, cannabis and other drugs together at a unit in Tarwin street at Morwell.
The victim and Sawyer-Thompson were alone in the house when she killed him.
She was suffering depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder and had an IQ score of 70.
Justice system has 'failed', sister of victim says
The defensive homicide offence was abolished in Victoria in November 2014, just five months after Mr Nankervis' death.
In a victim impact statement read to the court, Mr Nankervis' sister Kathleen said she had lost faith in the justice system.
"It failed Jack. The case used a lucky loophole and the system ran with it," she said.
Defensive homicide carries a maximum penalty of 20 years imprisonment.
The hearing continues.
POSTED THU NOV 17 18:18:00 EST 2016
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