Friday, November 11, 2016

Community Safety Female Aggression Bullying How and Why Girls/ Women Bully Mobbing Rumour Spread Cyberbullying Covert Bullying Huffington Post Psychology Today Sep 03, 2011 Reach Out and Australian Human Rights Commission 2011 Covert bullying: A review of national and international research Australian Covert Bullying Prevalence Study (ACBPS) Authors Donna Cross Therese Shaw Lydia Hearn Melanie Epstein Helen Monks Leanne Lester Laura Thomas Data Analysis Australia Child Health Promotion Research Centre Edith Cowan University, May 2009 "Social exclusion has been demonstrated to be the worst form of bullying [92]. In extreme forms it has been linked to suicide" [206]. Edith Cowan University, May 2009 Smartphones Social Media Social "Knowledge" Social Contagion Social Exclusion "As a society we have only said NO to #overtbullying We have opened the floodgates to covert bullying and cyberbullying Woo hoo!" Pete Dowe "my bad word is my bond" female bully “Sentimental insistence on female innocence,” suggests The New York Times, “does no service to women, who should be treated as human beings with a capacity for aggression and held equally accountable for their actions.” Ed Brodow



“Sentimental insistence on female innocence,” suggests The New York Times, “does no service to women, who should be treated as human beings with a capacity for aggression and held equally accountable for their actions.”


  


"my bad word is my bond"

female bully


"As a society we have only said NO to #overtbullying 

We have opened the floodgates to covert bullying and cyberbullying 

Woo hoo!"  

Pete Dowe



"I wouldn't want to be a member of any group I had to denounce someone to be a member.

So I skipped the denunciation ceremony"


Pete Dowe






Girls/ women who bully

Cyberbullying has become the latest negative tool in the bully’s toolbox. 

Here, the bully can attack, create cliques, gossip, spread rumors, and character-assassinate their target, anonymously.

As a result of the anonymity of the Internet, this relational aggression is particularly toxic. 

Girls are so dependent on relationships that some have been known to go to sleep with their cell phones. So you can imagine how girls feel when they view Facebook pictures of groups they are not included in, parties they have been left out of, and relationships they don’t have... never mind being defriended. This kind of trauma can lead to jealousy, feelings of rejection, sadness, depression, and even suicide.

When women bully, and they do, it is often related to both competition and judgment. Judgment offers control and it has the capacity to lead to cruelty. However, this need for control can be a compensation in women for both self-scrutiny and the fear of being seen.

The insecurity of believing that our personal flaws may become visible and therefore attacked, creates the all too familiar internal dialogue of criticism, that inner voice from early childhood that answers to our own feelings of unworthiness and low self-esteem.


The words now associated with female aggressive behavior include: 
excluding, ignoring, teasing, gossiping, secrets, backstabbing, rumor spreading and hostile body language (i.e., eye-rolling and smirking).  
Most damaging is turning the victim into a social "undesirable". 
The behavior and associated anger is hidden, often wrapped in a package seen as somewhat harmless or just a "girl thing".  

The covert nature of the aggression leaves the victim with no forum to refute the accusations 
and, in fact, attempts to defend oneself leads to an escalation of the aggression." 

(Bullying in the Female World
The Hidden Aggression Behind the Innocent Smile)
Psychology Today Sep 03, 2011


"With the growing data indicating that, for both boys and girls, covert forms of bullying are likely to ‘cause the greatest amount of suffering, while they have a greater chance of going unnoticed by teachers’ [122], 

it is clear that the old saying ‘sticks and stones may break my bones, but names will never harm me’ is not only inaccurate, but is also dangerous in that it has marginalised the importance of covert bullying..."

Examples of relational aggression and bullying include playing practical jokes, teasing and embarrassing a person, imitating them behind their backs, breaking secrets, criticising their clothes or personalities, spreading hurtful rumours, sending abusive notes, whispering, and/or maliciously excluding them [32;


https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-long-reach-childhood/201109/bullying-in-the-female-world



“It has been suggested, therefore, 

that dysfunctional groups, with a high level of imbalance of power among members, are far more likely to use covert, manipulative forms of bullying [192]

The major difference between genders is that for girls, holding social knowledge equates to holding social power as a means of manipulating their peers,”


Social Contagion

A further aspect of using the peer group as a method of bullying is the opportunity for rapid transmission
of emotions and behaviours through a crowd, diffusing the level of individual responsibility [184], so that
each member feels less responsible for the victimisation, a process referred to as 
‘social contagion’


Social exclusion has been demonstrated to be the worst form of bullying [92]. In extreme forms it has been linked to suicide [206].
Edith Cowan University, May 2009


“Prior to reviewing the key characteristics of those children who are bullied and those who bully others, an important issue that Garandeau and Cillessen [139] have highlighted is that in each school class there are rarely more than one or two children who are bullied.
This has served to reinforce the notion that the person who is being bullied must have done something wrong, or possesses some negative personality traits that encourages the rest of the group to reject them, resulting in lack of empathy on the part of the group towards them and the ‘illusion of the single target’ [198].”

Covert bullying: A review of national and international research Australian Covert Bullying Prevalence Study (ACBPS) Authors Donna Cross Therese Shaw Lydia Hearn Melanie Epstein Helen Monks Leanne Lester Laura Thomas Data Analysis Australia Child Health Promotion Research Centre Edith Cowan University, May 2009



·         Make it clear to your friends that you won’t be involved in bullying behaviour
·         Never stand by and watch or encourage bullying behaviour
·         Do not harass, tease or spread gossip about others, this includes on social networking sites like Facebook 
·          
·         Reach Out and Australian Human Rights Commission 2011


No comments:

Post a Comment