Thursday, October 20, 2016

Community Safety Fear of Crime Cyberbullying Rumour Spread VIDEO "Freak Out!" Chic - le freak - 1978 Histrionic Personality Attention Seeking Hypervigilantism Social Exclusion Emotional Blackmail and Comment by Pete Dowe




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4KUL9-eNXzQ&feature=youtu.be



What does cyberbullying look like?
·         Being sent mean or hurtful text messages from someone you know or even someone you don’t know
·         Getting nasty, threatening or hurtful messages through social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter, or through sites where people can ask / answer questions like Formspring or Internet forums
·         People sending photos and videos of you to others to try and embarrass or hurt you
·         People spreading rumours about you via emails or social networking sites or text messages
·         People trying to stop you from communicating with others
·         People stealing your passwords or getting into your accounts and changing the information there
·         People setting up fake profiles pretending to be you, or posting messages or status updates from your accounts
Australian Human Rights Commission and Reach Out 2011




Cyberbullying Law
 "Under Australian Commonwealth law it is an offence to “use a carriage service to menace, harass or cause offence, or for the purposes of a threat”. It is also an offence to “knowingly or recklessly use a telecommunications service in such a way as would be regarded by reasonable persons being, in all the circumstances, offensive”
Maximum Penalty 3 years Imprisonment
"A #victoriapolice spokesman said a person found guilty of revenge-porn type posts faced up to
10 years in jail."

Sydney Morning Herald 
April 19th 2016

Cyberbullying has become the latest negative tool in the bully’s toolbox. 

Here, the bully can attack, create cliques, gossip, spread rumors, and character-assassinate their target, anonymously.

As a result of the anonymity of the Internet, this relational aggression is particularly toxic. 

Girls are so dependent on relationships that some have been known to go to sleep with their cell phones. So you can imagine how girls feel when they view Facebook pictures of groups they are not included in, parties they have been left out of, and relationships they don’t have... never mind being defriended. This kind of trauma can lead to jealousy, feelings of rejection, sadness, depression, and even suicide. When women bully, and they do, it is often related to both competition and judgment. Judgment offers control and it has the capacity to lead to cruelty. However, this need for control can be a compensation in women for both self-scrutiny and the fear of being seen. The insecurity of believing that our personal flaws may become visible and therefore attacked, creates the all too familiar internal dialogue of criticism, that inner voice from early childhood that answers to our own feelings of unworthiness and low self-esteem.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-gail-gross/girls-who-bully-and-the-women-they-learn-from_b_4034100.html


Social Exclusion Social Contagion 

" A further aspect of using the peer group as a method of bullying is the opportunity for rapid transmission of emotions and behaviours through a crowd, diffusing the level of individual responsibility [184], so that each member feels less responsible for the victimisation, a process referred to as   ‘social contagion’"  

“Social exclusion has been demonstrated to be the worst form of bullying [92]. In extreme forms it has been linked to suicide [206].”  

Edith Cowan University May, 2009 

Feelings of Safety when walking alone after Dark

"We will not walk in fear of one another. We will not be driven by fear into an age of unreason if we dig deep in our history and our doctrine"


Ed Murrow



 "The (feelings of) “safety on the streets after dark” question is a very common one in crime surveys, and indeed is sometimes the only one asked. 


"Therefore organisations which promote women walking at night are promoting a high-fear-of-crime group to put itself in a high-fear-of-crime situation. Fine, they have every right to do so. But in this hyper-vigilant, high-fear era, we need to be clear on where the fear is coming from. And re vigilantism, we cannot scapegoat others for our pre-existing fear." 

Pete Dowe

Fear of Crime. 

This is a curly issue to raise, and although I write about high-fear, I must stress from the outset that VICTIMS DO NOT MAKE PERPETRATORS PERPETRATE, VICTIMS DO NOT ASK FOR IT, and WOMEN HAVE THE RIGHT TO WALK ANYWHERE ANYTIME. I seek here to put perspective on Fear of Crime. The Australian Institute of Criminology defines women as a high-fear of crime group. “A point of some importance is that “high-fear” groups are not especially characterised by age. Rather differences, hold within age groups. Thus, for instance, while it is well established that women are more fearful of crime than men (or at least admit to it more), younger women are more fearful than younger men, as well as older women being more fearful than older men.” The Australian Institute of Criminology also says that fear for “safety on the streets after dark” is a general, non-specific fear. 
 "The “safety on the streets after dark” question is a very common one in crime surveys, and indeed is sometimes the only one asked. 
The much higher levels of anxiety among older people in response to this question may well explain why the notion of excessive fear among older people has taken such hold."

"The reason why older people are more fearful about their safety on the streets alone at night is not entirely clear. Note that the question does not mention crime, and it could be that the prospect of being out alone on dark public streets may evoke anxiety about a greater range of mishaps (for example, falling over), especially as the emotional, physical and financial consequences could be worse for older people" (James & Graycar 2000).

"The question is also hypothetical for those who rarely go out alone after dark, which will be the case for many older people. It might also be that “street-crime” affecting older people is particularly overdramatised in the media—and many older people may form their perception of crime through this."

Therefore organisations which promote women walking at night are promoting a high-fear-of-crime group to put itself in a high-fear-of-crime situation. Fine, they have every right to do so. But in this hyper-vigilant, high-fear era, we need to be clear on where the fear is coming from. And re vigilantism, we cannot scapegoat others for our pre-existing fear.

Pete Dowe

Fear of Crime Ch. 4

A Safe and Secure Environment for Older Australians

Marianne James, Adam Graycar and Pat Mayhew

Australian Institute of Criminology Research and Public Policy Series No. 51 2003



Jill Meagher's rape and murder was an horrific tragedy. I recoil from thought of what her last hours/ minutes of life must have been like. The Parole Board of Victoria failed Jill and Tom Meagher miserably, and indeed the whole of Victoria. Jill Meagher's tragedy must not however be used to justify vigilantism. cyberbullying nor covert bullying.

I argue the authorities need to clarify the meaning of

“If you see something say something” as it has inadvertently “legitimised” vigilantism, the spreading of lies and rumours, covert bullying and cyber bullying.

There is a hyper-vigilant community with vigilantism and what seems to be a perverse notion of “progressive community minded” vigilantism.

“If you see something say something”

See what? Someone you don’t like the look of?

A mis-interpretation of law-abiding behaviour?

Say something to who? Facebook? Other Social Media? Everyone you know and run into?
Many people cannot tell the difference between a photo put on social media by Victoria Police and a photo put online by a cyberbullying vigilante.

Say something to the authorities if you are genuinely concerned.

And leave it at that.

Complainants must be genuine and alerting the authorities of their concerns,

 not vigilantes spreading lies and rumours.

The authorities need to clarify “If you see something say something”

and emphasise that there is no role for vigilantes to play!


Pete Dowe  




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