Thursday, May 19, 2016

Community Safety Gender Equality Rise of women teachers 'turning boys off education' as report reveals girls born this year will be 75% more likely to go to university in UK Dailymail.co.uk/news May 12th 2016 More women than men graduate from higher education in Victoria, Australia Social Exclusion




Rise of women teachers 'turning boys off education' as report reveals girls born this year will be 75% more likely to go to university in UK

More women than men graduate from higher education in Victoria, Australia



Rise of women teachers 'turning boys off education' as report reveals girls born this year will be 75% more likely to go to university 

  • Ucas chief said 'dominance' of female teachers had negative effect on boys
  • Currently 455,000 teachers at state schools, with 75 per cent being female
  • Around five-sixths of universities have more female than male students
 Ucas chief Mary Curnock Cook (pictured) has claimed a fall in boys going to university is due to the rise of female teachers in Britain's schools 
 Ucas chief Mary Curnock Cook (pictured) has claimed a fall in boys going to university is due to the rise of female teachers in Britain's schools 
An admissions tsar has claimed a fall in boys going to university is due to the rise of female teachers in Britain's schools.
The 'dominance' of women taking classes is contributing to male students ending their academic careers early, says Ucas chief Mary Curnock Cook.
Ms Curnock Cook made the controversial comments in the foreword of a study that says girls are 75 per cent more likely to go on to university.
Currently there are 455,000 teachers at state schools across the country and 74 per cent are women.
Writing in the report by the Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI), Ms Curnock Cook said: ‘Many commentators, including me, have suggested that the dominance of women in the school workforce may play a role in boys’ under performance relative to girls. 
'While this report does not find evidence to support the theory, I remain instinctively convinced that, as in any other area of life, gender imbalance will itself generate further imbalance. 
'Just as the performance of boys at GCSE has declined relative to girls, so the proportion of female teachers has increased. 
'Up until 1993, male teachers in secondary education were in the majority. In the UCAS Teacher Training admissions (UTT) service today, more women apply and they also achieve higher offer and acceptance rates.' 
The HEPI study also revealed that around five-sixths of universities and colleges have more female than male students.
But apart from initial teacher training, only two institutions have set targets for 2016/17 on recruiting more men.
The report argues that failing to address the issue now is simply storing up problems for the future.
Dealing with the under-achievement of young men at university does not interfere with tackling other inequalities in the system - such as the gap between rich and poor, it said.
'The weak performance of people from disadvantaged backgrounds or certain ethnic groups can only be fully addressed by dealing with the differences in male and female achievement,' it continued.
'For example, while men underperform overall, poor white men have the worst record of all.
'So tackling the underperformance of young men is essential if we are to tackle other dismal higher education performance indicators.'
Ms Curnock Cook writes: 'On current trends, the gap between rich and poor will be eclipsed by the gap between males and females within a decade.'
Latest Ucas figures show a record 9.2 percentage point gap entry rate between the sexes, with women 35 per cent more likely to go to university than men.
Currently there are 455,000 teachers at state schools across the country and just 26 per cent are male
Currently there are 455,000 teachers at state schools across the country and just 26 per cent are male
'If this differential growth carries on unchecked, then girls born this year will be 75% more likely to go to university than their male peers,'  Ms Curnock Cook added.
The study suggested that one reason for the gulf may be that in the past, careers traditionally chosen by women, such as nursing and teaching, did not require full degrees.
When this changed, the number of women in higher education dramatically increased, it said.
If students taking subjects linked to medicine - such as nursing, and education were taken out of figures, the difference between the total number of male and female university students falls from around 281,000 to 34,000.
HEPI argues that a number of policies would help to boost the numbers of men at university, including official sources of information targeted specifically at young men, and a Take Our Sons To University Day.
It also calls for more institutions to consider setting goals for male recruitment. The study goes on to say that there is evidence that young women's brains change earlier than males, and it is possible that some young men may benefit from not being rushed straight from school to university.
HEPI director and report co-author Nick Hillman said: 'Nearly everyone seems to have a vague sense that our education system is letting young men down, but there are few detailed studies of the problem and almost no clear policy recommendations on what to do about it.
The Higher Education Policy Institute study says that girls are 75 per cent more likely to go on to university
The Higher Education Policy Institute study says that girls are 75 per cent more likely to go on to university
This graph from the HEPI study shows the decline in men going to university over the decades since 1920
This graph from the HEPI study shows the decline in men going to university over the decades since 1920
'Young men are much less likely to enter higher education, are more likely to drop out and are less likely to secure a top degree than women.
'Yet, aside from initial teacher training, only two higher education institutions currently have a specific target to recruit more male students.
'That is a serious problem that we need to tackle. Of course women face substantial challenges too. Female graduates earn lower salaries than male graduates.
'Female academics face too many obstacles in being promoted. Lad culture can make life uncomfortable for female students.
'But policy-making is not a zero-sum game in which you have to choose between caring for one group or the other.
'Indeed, we can only tackle the socio-economic gap in higher education participation by focusing on the underachievement of young men, and particularly disadvantaged young white men.'



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3586401/Rise-women-teachers-turning-boys-education-report-reveals-girls-born-year-75-likely-university.html#ixzz499RBNw00
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3586401/Rise-women-teachers-turning-boys-education-report-reveals-girls-born-year-75-likely-university.html

No comments:

Post a Comment