Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Cycling Safety Cycling Safely Victoria's Cycling Strategy Bicycle Network Victoria blames unsafe cycling behaviour problem on increased cycling participation and inadequate cycling infrastructure Melbourne cyclists turn on each other as bike lanes become congested Herald Sun February 23, 2016 “Cyclists are much more likely to Die from Bicycle Alone Accidents/ Bike Falls and Riding on the Footpath onto the Road or Crossing than Dooring” Pete Dowe Cycling Deaths Fatalities Risk Reduction Informed Choice Inadequate Cycling Infrastructure Victoria's Cycling Strategy Focus on Increasing/ Encouraging Cycling Participation may be Negligent“ Cyclists who break the Law are much more likely to be killed or seriously injured” Bicycle Network Victoria "Young people are being killed riding off the footpath onto the road" Bicycle Network Victoria Ride2School Ride2Work




“Cyclists who break the law are much more likely to be killed or seriously injured”

Bicycle Victoria’s Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria (2002).



In fact Bicycle Network Victoria has blamed the unsafe cycling behaviour problem on the increase in cycling participation and inadequate cycling infrastructure.

Bicycle Network CEO Craig Richards said a morning-peak ride to work in Melbourne now felt “like a packed crowd at the MCG”.
“To some extent we have become a victim of our own success. The huge increase in riding is outstripping the provision of decent facilities by the State Government and councils,” he said.

“The crush is getting so bad in some places that riders are starting to get stroppy because there is just not enough space to ride safely.

“Riders like to use their trips to unwind and leave the troubles of the world behind, but the overcrowding of bike lanes is putting everyone on edge.”

The popularity of the bike lanes has led to cycle rage, with faster riders infuriated at being unable to overtake slower cyclists, and some riders forced to swerve into traffic resulting in crashes and near-misses.

 Some women report feeling too intimidated to ride.

Herald Sun Feb 23rd 2016

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/melbourne-cyclists-turn-on-each-other-as-bike-lanes-become-congested/news-story/2854a75fae9c305f64915136f210a747?sv=2602a8075d62af1b4b62fd182d3b95de&login=1

"The fact so many new riders were taking to the roads meant there were a big group of "newbie" cyclists who had yet to learn the best way to conduct themselves on the roads,”
"the fact infrastructure in Melbourne had not kept up with the huge increase in cycling numbers was a factor in tensions between cyclists and motorists."
Gary Brennan
Bicycle Network Victoria 

Herald Sun February 13, 2013

-           
-          Why then ought the “Victorian Government Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources seek to “make it easier for people to take up riding” or focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation”
-          without first giving citizens an informed choice as to the risks involved and risk reduction behaviour,
-          without addressing cyclists’ behaviour modification
-          and without providing adequate cycling infrastructure?

I argue that the Victorian Government
Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources policy of “making it easier for people to take up riding” or its focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation” without first addressing cyclists’ behaviour modification and inadequate cycling infrastructure
“may be found to be negligent where a failure to take reasonable care results in some injury or loss.”


“Cyclists who break the law are much more likely to be killed or seriously injured”

Bicycle Victoria’s Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria (2002).  

Cycling behaviour modification is best addressed off road before people take up cycling.
If cycling is to be a serious form of transport and I argue cycling should be a serious form of transport then the Victorian Government Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources, the Victorian Cycling Community and Victoria’s Cycling Strategy must take Cyclists’ responsibilities seriously.

Pete Dowe
Road Safety Advocate



Melbourne cyclists turn on each other as bike lanes become congested
February 23, 2016 12:07am
ALEKS DEVICTRANSPORT REPORTERHerald Sun
 


Cyclists in Carlton. Picture: Jason Edwards
CYCLISTS have started turning on each other as they fight for space in the city’s increasingly congested bike lanes.
Victoria’s peak cycling lobby group says the solution is to upgrade key routes.
The City of Melbourne denies a problem, saying some lines have already been widened to cater for growth.
Are Melbourne cyclists getting angrier? Scroll down to have your say
Slower bicycle commuters say they are copping the brunt from speedsters who see ride to work as a race, while motorists continue to fume at riders hogging road space.
Bicycles now comprise nearly 17 per cent of vehicles travelling into the CBD between 7am and 10am, and the figure is tipped to jump to 25 per cent by 2020, City of Melbourne research shows.
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The popularity of the bike lanes has led to cycle rage, with faster riders infuriated at being unable to overtake slower cyclists, and some riders forced to swerve into traffic resulting in crashes and near-misses.
Some women report feeling too intimidated to ride.
Bicycle Network CEO Craig Richards said a morning-peak ride to work in Melbourne now felt “like a packed crowd at the MCG”.
“To some extent we have become a victim of our own success. The huge increase in riding is outstripping the provision of decent facilities by the State Government and councils,” he said.
“The crush is getting so bad in some places that riders are starting to get stroppy because there is just not enough space to ride safely.
“Riders like to use their trips to unwind and leave the troubles of the world behind, but the overcrowding of bike lanes is putting everyone on edge.”
City of Melbourne spokesman Carlos Ibarra said the council was not aware of any tension between cyclists but acknowledged riders “were mindful of space” in the morning peak.
“We continue to improve the number, quality, safety and width of bike lanes and paths to encourage more people to ride into the city,” he said.
Mr Ibarra said cyclists were provided with several route options to spread volumes.
In a bid to ease the squeeze, kerbside separated bike lanes were installed on Swanston Street, La Trobe Street, St Kilda Road, Albert Street and Elizabeth Street, the dedicated bike lane on Princes Bridge.
Painted chevron separators on each side of the bike lane were also placed on existing bike lanes to boost separation between the bike lane and cars and allowing cyclists to overtake slower cyclists.
Mr Richards nominated St Kilda Road as a hot spot where riders felt most “aggravated” because the lanes were too narrow, there were too many parked cars, and the intersections could not cater for bikes when it was a red light.
aleks.devic@news.com.au
@AleksDevic

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/melbourne-cyclists-turn-on-each-other-as-bike-lanes-become-congested/news-story/2854a75fae9c305f64915136f210a747?sv=2602a8075d62af1b4b62fd182d3b95de&login=1




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