Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Community Safety Parole Bail Victoria Sentencing Known Perpetrators Serious Sex Offenders Parole board* under fire again after two high-profile murder suspects were free to kill a woman and child Herald Sun Feb 9th 2016 Vigilantism Hyper-Vigilantism the Rise of. Fear of Crime Cyberbullying Covert Bullying Rumour Spread Female Aggression




Parole board* under fire again after two high-profile murder suspects were free to kill a woman and child
February 9, 2016 10:15am
REBEKAH CAVANAGHHerald Sun
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The Parole Board has come under fire again.

EXCLUSIVE: TWO high-profile murder suspects were free to kill their victims — a woman and a child — despite parole breaches and exploiting a supervision loophole.

The disturbing revelation has plunged the parole board back into crisis and comes despite extensive reforms in recent years to improve Victoria’s flawed justice system.

The alleged killers are protected by the legal system and cannot be identified. But the Herald Sun can reveal one of the men breached parole twice in matters that should have seen him behind bars.

The convicted criminal, who was on parole after having his original sentence for a serious offence reduced at appeal, allegedly returned a positive drug test when reporting to Corrections Victoria, and on further investigation, police claim they found child porn on his mobile phone.

A court heard the images were of his then partner’s five-year-old daughter, naked in various poses on a bed and in the bath.

The girl’s mother considered the images so serious she ended her relationship with the accused.
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But a magistrate thought they were innocent, striking out the breach, sending the accused back into the community only for him be charged with a torturous murder six months later.

The other accused killer refused to do rehabilitation programs while in prison for a violent robbery and drugs offences, opting instead to not take parole and leave prison on straight release without any supervision after his time.

In a further failure of the justice system, on his release he was allowed to resettle at a residence a judge had earlier deemed inappropriate.

He then went on to allegedly rape and kill a young local girl not even a month later.

A prison insider told the Herald Sun the state’s parole and judicial system — despite sweeping reforms made in the wake of the murder of Jill Meagher by parolee Adrian Bayley in 2012 — was “a ­disgrace”.

“It’s hard to believe that the Government injected up to $100 million into fixing this, and now it happens again,” the source said.

“Surely there’s a level of ­responsibility somewhere.’’

The source said it was also “wrong” prisoners could refuse to do correctional rehabilitation programs. “This man was deemed to have committed a violent offence and clearly he hasn’t demonstrated he wants to address those problems,” the insider said.

An investigation by Victorian Ombudsman Deborah Glass last year found a growing number of prisoners were choosing not to apply for parole upon eligibility in favour of completing their maximum sentence and leave on straight release without the watchful eye of authorities.

In her report released in September, Ms Glass said: “This is also not consistent with the intent of any parole system and means that many prisoners are simply being warehoused, leaving prison without the reasons behind their offending and risk of ­reoffending being addressed.”

A review of the judicial ­system by former High Court justice Ian Callinan following the murder of Ms Meagher in 2012 found a litany of problems with the handling of parolees.

Corrections Victoria would not say if the handling of the two men was under review, citing: “It would be inappropriate to comment on matters currently before the court.”

Both men remain behind bars as they await court ­appearances.

rebekah.cavanagh@news.com.au

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