Thursday, November 26, 2015

Community Safety Public Lighting Fear of Crime Locals walk in fear on dark side streets of Sydney Road, Brunswick Melbourne The Age June 2, 2014 Let there be LIGHT! & Comment by Pete Dowe "fearful of safety on the streets alone at night" Vigilantism Hyper Vigilantism Cyberbullying Covert Bullying Female Aggression




Let there be LIGHT!

http://petedowecommunitysafetyadvocate.blogspot.com/2015/11/community-safety-public-lighting-fear.html

“A point of some importance is that “high-fear” groups are not especially characterised by age. Rather differences, hold within age groups. Thus, for instance, while it is well established that women are more fearful of crime than men (or at least admit to it more), younger women are more fearful than younger men, as well as older women being more fearful than older men.”

“Apart from the gender difference, other main findings are:

“people who live in high-crime areas are more likely than those who live in areas with lower levels of crime to be fearful”

“local disorder (such as noisy neighbours, poor street-lighting, and teenagers hanging around) is predictive of virtually all measures of fear”

“personal experience of being victimised, and greater contact with other victims, heightens fear”

 Australian Institute of Criminology 2003

http://petedowecommunitysafetyadvocate.blogspot.com/2015/11/community-safety-public-lighting-fear.html


Locals walk in fear on dark side streets of Sydney Road, Brunswick

The Age
DATE
June 2, 2014

Tessa van der Riet
Journalist
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Brunswick locals feeling left in the dark
RESIDENTS of BRUNSWICK are demanding better lighting for the streets near Sydney Road, after the recent spate of assaults against women in their area.
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Brunswick locals are demanding improved lighting for side streets after three assaults on women near Sydney Road.
Since the death of Jill Meagher 20 months ago, many residents have felt at risk, and the LOCAL TRADERS' association is planning a Street Smart workshop on Tuesday to provide safety advice.
THE MANAGER of the Sydney Road Brunswick Association, Claire Perry, said: ''[The streets] feel very unsafe for a lot of people. Some are lit on one side of the street and the light is very dim.
Local Elizabeth Pertile says she runs home because of the dark side streets off Sydney Road, Brunswick. Photo: Eddie Jim
''After these last few incidents, the council might realise that it is a very, very important ISSUE for everyone in our community.''
Elizabeth Pertile, a long-time resident of Blyth Street, says she finds herself ''running home like a crazy maniac'' because the streets are so dark. ''You feel a little insecure when you can't see 10 or 20 metres ahead of you,'' she said.
''You just don't know who's out there and there's always that threat.''
What has been spent of Moreland Council's $125,000 lighting budget for 2013-14 has gone on lights along the Upfield bike trail.
Moreland mayor Lambros Tapinos said the council ''shares the community's safety concerns and is working hard to ADDRESS issues on a number of fronts''.
On Tuesday, the council met CitiPower to request quotes for an upgrade to stronger LED lights for some street lamps, particularly in the streets that lead from Sydney Road to Brunswick TRAIN STATIONS.
According to the council, THE CURRENT level of lighting in Brunswick is above Australian standards.
The latest crime statistics for Brunswick, released last Wednesday, show a small increase in THE NUMBER of non-domestic assaults to 597 in the past year.
Home burglary has increased by 18.4 per cent, but robbery has decreased by 13.3 per cent to 98 INCIDENTS in the past year.

Let there be LIGHT!

Comment by Pete Dowe

Fear of Crime. 
This is a curly issue to raise, and although I write about high-fear, I must stress from the outset that VICTIMS DO NOT MAKE PERPETRATORS PERPETRATE, VICTIMS DO NOT ASK FOR IT, and WOMEN HAVE THE RIGHT TO WALK ANYWHERE ANYTIME. I seek here to put perspective on Fear of Crime. The Australian Institute of Criminology defines women as a high-fear of crime group. 

“A point of some importance is that “high-fear” groups are not especially characterised by age. Rather differences, hold within age groups. Thus, for instance, while it is well established that women are more fearful of crime than men (or at least admit to it more), younger women are more fearful than younger men, as well as older women being more fearful than older men.”

“Apart from the gender difference, other main findings are:

“people who live in high-crime areas are more likely than those who live in areas with lower levels of crime to be fearful”

“local disorder (such as noisy neighbours, poor street-lighting, and teenagers hanging around) is predictive of virtually all measures of fear”

“personal experience of being victimised, and greater contact with other victims, heightens fear”

The Australian Institute of Criminology also says that fear for “safety on the streets after dark” is a general, non-specific fear.  "The “safety on the streets after dark” question is a very common one in crime surveys, and indeed is sometimes the only one asked. The much higher levels of anxiety among older people in response to this question may well explain why the notion of excessive fear among older people has taken such hold."

"The reason why older people are more fearful about their safety on the streets alone at night is not entirely clear. Note that the question does not mention crime, and it could be that the prospect of being out alone on dark public streets may evoke anxiety about a greater range of mishaps (for example, falling over), especially as the emotional, physical and financial consequences could be worse for older people" (James & Graycar 2000).


"The question is also hypothetical for those who rarely go out alone after dark, which will be the case for many older people. It might also be that “street-crime” affecting older people is particularly overdramatised in the media—and many older people may form their perception of crime through this."



“Jill's (Meagher's) death tapped into all women's collective fears of the stranger and the dark alley,” 

says RMIT's Dr Anastasia Powell, a PHD in criminology and expert in hate-crimes against women.
But despite being a primal fear, it hardly ever happens. 

According to Dr Powell's research for VicHealth the most common form of death for Victorian women AGEDhttps://www.blogger.com/blogger.g?blogID=1641959173904224057#allposts
 15-44 is "intimate partner violence".

Not cars, not smoking, but being killed by a man they know.


http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/a-crime-that-shook-our-city-20130611-2o1yj.html



Therefore organisations which promote women walking at night are promoting a high-fear-of-crime group to put itself in a high-fear-of-crime situation. Fine, they have every right to do so. But in this hyper-vigilant, high-fear era, we need to be clear on where the fear is coming from. And re vigilantism, we cannot scapegoat others for our pre-existing fear.


Pete Dowe




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