Friday, November 27, 2015

Community Safety Cyber Bullying Female Aggression Defamation Monica Foy’s joke about fallen Texas deputy sheriff news.com.au 7.9.15


“I never would write anything like that on Facebook, which is why I have a Twitter account,” she said.
“I wrote it there because I knew that no one would see it. That’s something that I knew that morning. There was no hashtag, I did not mention the deputy by name, I did not say Houston, I did not say anything specific at all.”

Monica Foy

This is not an apology nor remorse.
She does not take responsibility for her actions
Her explanation is deceptive and self-deceptive.
She only defamed someone on twitter?
She put it online so that no one would see it?

Just admit what you did was wrong!

Pete Dowe



Monica Foy’s joke about fallen Texas deputy sheriff a throwback to the Justine Sacco saga

Monica Foy is no longer on Twitter or Facebook.
ROHAN SMITH and CHARIS CHANGnews.com.au
MONICA Foy tweeted about a dead cop “deserving” to die. She even labelled him a “perv”.
But she never expected the massive backlash that would follow.
Within hours, the 26-year-old student was famous on social media for all the wrong reasons. She was this year’s Justine Sacco.
Ms Foy had less than 80 followers on Twitter when she shared a crass joke about the tragic death of Texas deputy sheriff Darren Goforth, a 10-year veteran of the force who was shot in the back of the head, apparently at random, at a service station in Houston on August 31.
“I can’t believe so many people care about a dead cop and NO ONE has thought to ask what he did to deserve it,” she wrote.
Not finished there, Ms Foy made one last dig at the fallen 47-year-old.
“He had creepy perv eyes ...” she observed in the early morning hours of September 1, less than a day after officer Goforth’s family was given the bad news.
The tweet that forced Monica Foy to delete Twitter.
The tweet that forced Monica Foy to delete Twitter.Source:Twitter
Like Justine Sacco, Monica Foy would feel the full force of Twitter’s moral outrage.
Ms Sacco, a PR consultant, tweeted on December 20, 2013: “Going to Africa. Hope I don’t get AIDS. Just kidding. I’m white!” While she was in the air the hashtag #HasJustineLandedYet began trending on Twitter, her employer sacked her and people turned up at the airport to photograph her shocked reaction when she landed and switched on her phone.
She insisted it was a joke but context didn’t matter. Her words were circulated and a mob formed to exact justice for her perceived bigotry.
Ms Foy’s tweet was equally poorly-worded. It may very well have gone unnoticed had it not been for the keen eyes of Brandon Darby, a blogger behind conservative news website Breitbart Texas.
On Twitter Mr Darby retweeted Ms Foy’s joke to 25,000 followers with the words: “You have no idea how much you will regret having been this cold. Enjoy your coming fame!”
He was right. She had no idea how much she would regret it, nor did she have any idea how widely her tweet would be circulated.
In an interview with New York Magazine Ms Foy said she turned her phone off at 10.30am on September 1 and went to class. By the time she switched it back on at 3.30pm it was in a “constant vibration”.
Her mobile phone number was leaked and on her voicemail she received death threats from people saying they would “put you to sleep” and worse.
“It was kind of surreal,” she said. “I felt like an outside party watching it happen, I didn’t really feel hurt by the comments because it just felt like they’re ghosts — it wasn’t people that I know, that I’m friends with, or that I see in my community or care about their opinion of me.”
Ms Foy admitted she was attempting to be ironic, attempting to compare officer Goforth’s death to the black lives lost in America at the hands of white police. She said she never expected anyone to see it.
“I never would write anything like that on Facebook, which is why I have a Twitter account,” she said.
“I wrote it there because I knew that no one would see it. That’s something that I knew that morning. There was no hashtag, I did not mention the deputy by name, I did not say Houston, I did not say anything specific at all.”
The blogger who outed Ms Foy live-tweeted her downfall to thousands. It was like a train wreck; Hard to watch, impossible to turn away from.
“This cop-killer apologist decided to shut down her Twitter account,” he wrote.
“The woman who tweeted that Deputy Goforth deserved his execution blocked me for some reason.”
He also defended himself for fuelling the fire. He said he’d do the same thing again if he had to.
Ms Foy apologised. She told the Houston Chronicleshe was sorry for what she said and sorry for hurting the officer’s family.
“My statement and my choice of words were without the sensitivity that this tragedy calls for.
“I hope for nothing but peace and comfort for those in mourning, and cannot express how deeply I regret adding to their pain. To the individual officers who have showed the utmost kindness and professionalism in protecting the safety of my family and friends, who have suffered due to my actions: I thank you from the bottom of my heart for your ability to see past any bias you may hold against me and to continue to protect and serve the communities in your charge.
“I have a strong belief in the value of every human life, and believe that the American justice system, when free of corruption and abuse of power, safeguards the inherent dignity and worth of every life it touches. I again thank you for leading by example.”
The public backlash she felt, which included comments about her appearance and her weight, was also felt at home.
Ms Foy’s father Andrew told Houston radio he felt “sick to my stomach” and “could hardly breathe” when he read the “stupid remark my daughter tweeted”.
“Our whole family is distraught and stupefied with embarrassment,” Mr Foy wrote.
“She’s just a misguided college student that has flown off the handle with remarks that have had no forethought whatsoever and then later has had to choke on her words.
“I can’t find enough words to express how dismayed we are and the degree of remorse she’s feeling right now. I think she’s probably got the idea of how sick and despicable her tweet was.”
Ronson spoke at the Festival of Dangerous Ideas in Sydney on the weekend.
Ronson spoke at the Festival of Dangerous Ideas in Sydney on the weekend.Source:News Corp Australia
Welsh author Jon Ronson chronicled the lives of the publicly shamed.
Welsh author Jon Ronson chronicled the lives of the publicly shamed.Source:Supplied
Jon Ronson wrote about Justine Sacco at length in his book So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed. In it, he also wrote about others, including Lindsey Stone, a 32-year-old woman from Massachusetts who pretended to flip the bird at a sign calling for respect at Arlington National Cemetery’s Tomb of the Unknowns.
He said four weeks after the photograph was uploaded to Facebook, Ms Stone’s phone started vibrating repeatedly.
“Someone had found the photo and brought it to the attention of hordes of online strangers,” Ronson wrote.
“Soon there was a wildly popular “Fire Lindsey Stone” Facebook page. The next morning, there were news cameras outside her home; when she showed up to her job, at a program for developmentally disabled adults, she was told to hand over her keys.”
Ronson spoke at the Festival of Dangerous Ideas in Sydney on Saturday where he reflected on a culture of public humiliation unseen before the internet.
He said that in the early days of Twitter people could admit shameful secrets and find solace from others who also shared a similar experience but social media had now become a stage where everyone is either a “magnificent hero or a sickening villain”.
“You could live a good ethical life but some bad phraseology in a tweet could overwhelm it all (and) become a clue to your secret, inner evil,” Ronson said.
“What’s true is that we’re clever and stupid. What’s true is that we’re grey areas.”
He said he worried that what made social media great would also bring it undone.
“The great thing about social media is how it gave a voice to voiceless people but now we’ve created a surveillance society where the smartest way to survive is to go back to being voiceless. Let’s not do that.”
Monica Foy’s Twitter and Facebook accounts are still offline. Her story is a reminder of how quickly things turn ugly online. She received far worse than she deserved but she now sees the error of her ways.
“A lot of people are angry, and they have a right to be, because, you know, a guy was pumping gas in his uniform and he got shot 15 times in the back of the head, and that’s f***ed-up,” she said.
Justine Sacco felt the wrath of social media in 2013 over her joke.
Justine Sacco felt the wrath of social media in 2013 over her joke.Source:Supplied
Ms Sacco featured in Jon Ronson’s book So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed.
Ms Sacco featured in Jon Ronson’s book So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed.Source:Supplied
 

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