Friday, November 27, 2015

Community Safety Bullying Female Aggression 5 Reasons Bad Guys (and Bad Girls) Always Seem to Win (and How to Stop Them) For one thing, stop assuming 'someone else' will step up. Psychology Today Nov 20, 2015 Fear of Crime Rumour Spread Social Contagion Criminal Cyber Bullying Covert Bullying Ignominy by Covert Bullying Vigilantism Hyper Vigilantism


This article applies equally to women #genderequality  #femaleaggression

Most of us play by the rules

Bad girls don't

Bad girls play dirty

Pete Dowe

"Bad guys play dirty (and we let them get away with it).

Like it or not, most of us play by the rules and have a “trusting bias.” That is, we expect others to play by the rules and to deal with us honestly (research on deception shows that even when subjects are told that they will hear 50% truths and 50% lies, they tend to believe that the majority of what they hear is truthful).
Bad guys, however, don’t play by the rules, and quickly learn that it’s pretty easy to lie to others and get away with it. That’s why so many of us are duped by con artists, unscrupulous sales people, or others with bad motives."

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/cutting-edge-leadership/201511/5-reasons-bad-guys-always-seem-win-and-how-stop-them?utm_source=FacebookPost&utm_medium=FBPost&utm_campaign=FBPost


5 Reasons Bad Guys Always Seem to Win (and How to Stop Them)

For one thing, stop assuming 'someone else' will step up.
Posted Nov 20, 2015
Viorel Sima/Shutterstock
Source: Viorel Sima/Shutterstock
From corrupt leaders to successful bullies and criminals (and even terrorists), why does it always seem that the bad guys come out on top?
There are specific psychological reasons why bad people are able to exploit others to their advantage—part of the problem is our tolerance for bad behavior, and unwillingness to intervene. There is more we can do to stop the bad and promote the good—and we should remember that biases in social perception may give the illusion that the bad guys are winning, even though they’re really not.
1. Bad guys play dirty (and we let them get away with it).
Like it or not, most of us play by the rules and have a “trusting bias.” That is, we expect others to play by the rules and to deal with us honestly (research on deception shows that even when subjects are told that they will hear 50% truths and 50% lies, they tend to believe that the majority of what they hear is truthful).
Bad guys, however, don’t play by the rules, and quickly learn that it’s pretty easy to lie to others and get away with it. That’s why so many of us are duped by con artists, unscrupulous sales people, or others with bad motives.
What to Do About It: Develop a healthy skepticism. Of course, we don’t want to become paranoid or overly cautious, but we do need to engage our brains, ask questions, and probe to make sure that we are being dealt with honestly and fairly.
2. Bad guys understand power dynamics. 
As illustrated by Milgram’s shock experiments—in which people were willing to punish unseen others with painful electric shocks, merely because an authority figure told them to do so—bad guys understand that authority often gives them a free ride. We are often reluctant to question authority. That’s why con artists move about with an air of authority—they are more likely to be believed and go unquestioned. For example, in my neighborhood, bad guys have been spotted with clipboards, posing as “inspectors,” as they scope out houses before breaking into them.
What To Do About It: As the old 60s saying goes, “Question authority!” Again, engage your brain in order to see through bad guys hiding behind a thin veil of authority.
3. We're prone to the bystander effect.
All too often, we simply stand by when others are being bullied or attacked—not wanting to get involved, or not wanting to become the bad guys’ next target. Bullies and criminals often carefully pick their targets, choosing those who are less likely to retaliate. They may also pick targets in crowded areas, realizing that the bystander effect is surprisingly stronger in a crowd, due to a diffusion of responsibility: Everyone thinks, “Someone else will help,” or, when no one else does help, they assume it must not be an emergency.
What To Do About It: Take action. Many bad individuals are simply never challenged. If the bad guy is a bully, intervene and stand up to him or her. Of course, this takes courage. If everyone felt that it was his or her duty to take action, there would be no diffusion of responsibility, and a lot fewer instances of bad behavior.
4. Perceptual biases: 1. The Vividness Effect.
Have you ever noticed that bad things appear to happen in clusters? (For example, the notion that significant deaths happen in groups of three.) Much of this perception that bad events, and bad guys winning, are on the rise or occurring in clusters, is due to the vividness effect—vivid events take precedence in our memories. Moreover, this is intensified because the media becomes sensitized to a specific, vivid event (e.g., a terrorist attack) and searches for and reports on other similar events. It gives the illusion that the bad guys' evil deeds are on the rise, when they may not be.
Perceptual biases: 2. The Weighting of Negative Events. 
Research on social perception shows that we are more likely to notice and remember negative events, as opposed to positive ones. This gives the appearance that the bad guys are more active than they are and that bad things are on the rise.
What To Do About It: Be objective. Realize that bad events are more or less random, and that if we fought back against the bad guys—bullies, bad leaders, con artists, criminals—a lot fewer bad things would happen.
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https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/cutting-edge-leadership/201511/5-reasons-bad-guys-always-seem-win-and-how-stop-them?utm_source=FacebookPost&utm_medium=FBPost&utm_campaign=FBPost

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