Friday, October 2, 2015

Cycling Safety "Dooring" Road Rule 269(3) Vehicle Door Opened onto Traffic "Check for Bikes" Sticker Victorian Taxi Association Advice for Drivers and Riders VicRoads and Comment by Pete Dowe





 "Check for Bikes"  Victorian Taxi Association

Inside Rear-Passenger Door Silver Top Taxi Melbourne, Victoria, Australia



Road Rule 269(3) of the Victorian Road Safety Road Rules 2009 states it is an offence to cause a hazard to a person or a vehicle by opening a car door, leaving a door of a vehicle open, or getting off, or out of, a vehicle.


Advice for riders
  • Look out for drivers and passengers getting in and out of parked cars.
  • Be vigilant when riding alongside parked cars and ride out of the car door zone (if possible and safe to do so).
  • If you are riding on a length of road with a marked bicycle lane, you must ride in the bicycle lane unless it is impracticable to do so.
  • In places where there are a lot of parked cars, slow down.
  • Wear bright coloured clothing and use lights at night or in conditions of low light.
  • Share the road safely.

Advice for drivers

Bike riders are legitimate road users, and are therefore entitled to use the road just the same as any other road user. Car drivers and bike riders should share the road safely and look out for each other.
  • Get into the habit of always using your mirrors and doing a head check before opening your car door (one way to do this is to open the car door with your left hand)
  • Bike riders can travel quickly and may be much closer than you think
  • When getting into your car, face the oncoming traffic so you can see bike riders (and other road users) travelling towards you. Do not open your car door until they have passed.
  • Bike riders can ride between parked cars and the lane of traffic so, as a passenger, do not get out of a stationary car when in moving traffic.
  • Check out the following animation Checking for cyclists and motorcyclists [Video] (External link) for further information about how to be more aware of cyclists when opening your car door.
  • Share the road safely.



Comment by Pete Dowe

I support signage in strip-shopping centres re "Dooring" as "Dooring" mostly occurs un-surprisingly in strip-shopping centres: lines of cars and people getting in and out, and Check for Bikes stickers on the inside of car doors. Strip-shopping centres are also unsafe routes for cycling particularly where trams are also involved: i.e Sydney Rd, Brunswick St, Chapel St, Glenferrie Rd
“Dooring” is a common cycling accident type “on the radar” with the wider Victorian community,
but as part of the emphasis on other road users’ behaviour not cyclists'.
Collisions with vehicle doors opened onto traffic or “dooring” (DCA 163)* accounts for one cyclist fatality,
and 306 serious injuries in Victoria during the period June 30th 2004- June 30th 2013 according to VicRoads CrashStats.
Yet Nine cyclists were fatally injured riding from the footpath onto the road or a crossing (DCA 148)* in Victoria during the same period June 30th 2004- June 30th 2013 according to VicRoads CrashStats.
There were also 510 cyclists seriously injured riding from the footpath or driveway onto the road or a crossing during the same period.
The lion’s share of these fatalities and serious injuries also occurred to cyclists over 12 years of age riding on the footpath.
Six of the Nine cyclists fatally injured
riding from the footpath onto the road or a crossing DCA 148 in Victoria during the period June 30th 2004- June 30th 2013 according to VicRoads CrashStats
were aged 13 years or above and therefore illegally on the footpath.
394 of the 510 total cyclists seriously injured
riding from the footpath or driveway onto the road or a crossing DCA 147 and DCA 148 during the same period
were aged 13 years or above and therefore illegally on the footpath.
Therefore increasing the legal age limit for cyclists to ride on the footpath above 12 years of age does not better protect cyclists.
Yet riding from the footpath or driveway onto the road or a crossing is not a cycling safety issue in the wider community!


* Police use the Definition for Classifying Accidents (DCA) when reporting the geometry and circumstance of a crash.



Pete Dowe
Road Safety Advocate





 

No comments:

Post a Comment