"If they had breached this bloke when he broke parole those two people would be alive.": Greg Davies on Warren Alan Forbes (pictured). "If they had breached this bloke when he broke parole those two people would be alive.": Greg Davies on Warren Alan Forbes (pictured). Photo: Border Mail
A large number of parole jumpers who have fled interstate and overseas have been given a get out of jail free card by an Adult Parole Board policy that blocks attempts to arrest the offenders.
This is despite promises by the previous and present state governments to crack down on loopholes in the parole system.
Since the 2012 murder of Jill Meagher by parolee Adrian Bayley the Parole Board has been under scrutiny. Since the 2012 murder of Jill Meagher by parolee Adrian Bayley the Parole Board has been under scrutiny.
Detectives have located up to 100 criminals hiding interstate and a further dozen who have fled overseas but they remain at large because the Parole Board has not authorised court extraditions.
And police claim parole jumpers have committed a series of interstate after leaving Victoria.
On Thursday Victoria police successfully applied to the Wagga Wagga District Court to extradite parolee Warren Alan Forbes who was released after serving 13 years for two Albury homicides. Forbes had been released on parole in Victoria while serving a sentence for armed robbery, assault with intent to rob and theft. According to Victims of Crime Commissioner Greg Davies, "If they had breached this bloke when he broke parole those two people would be alive".
Masa Vukotic's killer Sean Price was released by the Parole Board into shared accommodation. Masa Vukotic's killer Sean Price was released by the Parole Board into shared accommodation.
He is expected to return to a Victorian prison to complete a further two years for breaking parole.
But police say the board has blocked extraditions in many cases when parole has already been cancelled and arrest warrants issued.
One source said the prevailing attitude is "If they are interstate then they are not our problem".
Police say when they locate the offenders interstate the Parole Board stalls the process due to the cost of the extradition process.
One source said interstate parole jumpers had gone on to commit serious offences including murder, rape and armed robbery, describing the decision as showing "a diabolical indifference to the safety of Australians".
An Adult Parole Board spokesperson said when notified an offender was interstate the board "may exercise its discretion to authorise the extradition of the offender to Victoria."
The spokesperson said a review showed that in the past five years extradition was approved in 62 per cent of cases where the offender was interstate.
Since the 2012 murder of Jill Meagher in Brunswick by parolee Adrian Bayley the Parole Board has been under scrutiny.
A 2013 review by former High Court Judge Ian Callinan was damning. He found the board's paper-based system obsolete, files out of date and parole slanted in favour of the offender at the expense of the public.
The previous government launched a reform program and the present government has launched another review after it was revealed that Sean Price, the killer of teenager Masa Vukotic, was released by the Parole Board into shared accommodation.
The Parole Board acted on a recommendation that Price would be less of a risk away from the so-called village of the damned at Corella Place, Ararat.
Premier Daniel Andrews said: "There's no doubt at all that this was a catastrophic failure of our criminal justice system."
Police Association secretary Ron Iddles said the refusal to authorise the arrest warrants "makes a mockery of the whole system".
"If offenders breach their parole conditions they should be brought back whereever they are. And if they commit offences interstate the Parole Board must be held accountable."
Mr Davies said the problem was farcical.
"We have been a nation for 114 years and yet we still have to extradite criminals from interstate.
"It would seem crazy that if criminals cross the county line then people stop chasing them.
"We have more than 100 people who have breached parole by leaving the state and they are being rewarded by their continued freedom."
Mr Davies said it appeared that little had been learned from the murders committed in Victoria by parolees.

What the parole board considers
  • The nature and seriousness of the offence(s) for which the offender was on parole.
  • The length of the parole period and the time the offender had spent on parole before it was cancelled.
  • The length of time that has elapsed since parole was cancelled.
  • The known circumstances of the offender.
  • Whether the offender has committed any further offences.