Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Community Safety Fear of Crime Public Lighting Feeling Unsafe Walking Alone After Dark Poorly Lit Streets Bayside Leader, Melbourne Aug 18th 2015 & Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC) 2003 Vigilantism Hyper-Vigilantism Covert Bullying Cyber Bullying


Let there be LIGHT!


Pete Dowe


"The “safety on the streets after dark” question is a very common one in crime surveys, and indeed is sometimes the only one asked. The much higher levels of anxiety among older people in response to this question may well explain why the notion of excessive fear among older people has taken such hold."

"The reason why older people are more fearful about their safety on the streets alone at night is not entirely clear. Note that the question does not mention crime, and it could be that the prospect of being out alone on dark public streets may evoke anxiety about a greater range of mishaps (for example, falling over), especially as the emotional, physical and financial consequences could be worse for older people" (James & Graycar 2000).


Australian Institute of Criminology 2003









Bayside Leader
Aug 18th 2015




"Therefore organisations which promote women walking at night/ after dark are promoting a high-fear-of-crime group to put itself in a high-fear-of-crime situation. Fine, they have every right to do so. But in this hyper-vigilant, high-fear era, we need to be clear on where the fear is coming from. And re vigilantism, we cannot scapegoat others for our pre-existing, non-specific fear." 

Pete Dowe



Fear of Crime. 

This is a curly issue to raise, and although I write about high-fear, I must stress from the outset that VICTIMS DO NOT MAKE PERPETRATORS PERPETRATE, VICTIMS DO NOT ASK FOR IT, and WOMEN HAVE THE RIGHT TO WALK ANYWHERE ANYTIME. I seek here to put perspective on Fear of Crime. The Australian Institute of Criminology defines women as a high-fear of crime group. “A point of some importance is that “high-fear” groups are not especially characterised by age. Rather differences, hold within age groups. Thus, for instance, while it is well established that women are more fearful of crime than men (or at least admit to it more), younger women are more fearful than younger men, as well as older women being more fearful than older men.” The Australian Institute of Criminology also says that fear for “safety on the streets after dark” is a general, non-specific fear.  "The “safety on the streets after dark” question is a very common one in crime surveys, and indeed is sometimes the only one asked. The much higher levels of anxiety among older people in response to this question may well explain why the notion of excessive fear among older people has taken such hold."

"The reason why older people are more fearful about their safety on the streets alone at night is not entirely clear. Note that the question does not mention crime, and it could be that the prospect of being out alone on dark public streets may evoke anxiety about a greater range of mishaps (for example, falling over), especially as the emotional, physical and financial consequences could be worse for older people" (James & Graycar 2000).

"The question is also hypothetical for those who rarely go out alone after dark, which will be the case for many older people. It might also be that “street-crime” affecting older people is particularly overdramatised in the media—and many older people may form their perception of crime through this."

Therefore organisations which promote women walking at night are promoting a high-fear-of-crime group to put itself in a high-fear-of-crime situation. Fine, they have every right to do so. But in this hyper-vigilant, high-fear era, we need to be clear on where the fear is coming from. And re vigilantism, we cannot scapegoat others for our pre-existing fear.
 

Pete Dowe


Fear of Crime Ch. 4

A Safe and Secure Environment for Older Australians

Marianne James, Adam Graycar and Pat Mayhew

Australian Institute of Criminology Research and Public Policy Series No. 51 2003

http://aic.gov.au/media_library/publications/rpp/51/rpp051.pdf

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