Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Cycling Bunch Cycling "Cyclist says he's fed up with pack mentality on our roads" "minimum-distance passing laws" "Should cyclists be made to keep off narrow roads?" Sunshine Coast Daily Qld & Editorial Oct.31st 2014 Road Rule 287 Duties of a driver (or rider) involved in an accident Road Rule 126 Difficulty Stopping Road Rule 151 Riding Two Abreast "change to single file to allow drivers to overtake safely" VicRoads Bunch Size Rec. Max. 20 Riders 'Road Train' Difficulty Overtaking Cycling Bunches Cyclist/ Driver Frustration Undue Risks Road Rage Amy Gillett Foundation CycleSport Victoria Coroner Graeme Johnstone Share the Road A Metre Matters Rule of Law Equality Cyclists’ Identification Reliable Photo ID Community Safety


“You can’t expect not to be subject to the law
if you want to be treated equally”
 

Klaus Mueller, (former) President, CycleSport Victoria

(Road law-breakers risk going to jail)
Mordialloc Chelsea Leader May 18th 2009



“It’s only fair that all vehicle users are treated equally”
 

Gary Brennan, Bicycle Victoria

(Road law-breakers risk going to jail)
Mordialloc Chelsea Leader May 18th 2009




"Sharing the Road means obeying the Road Rules, being predictable 

 and respecting the rights of others who use the road" 



Code of Conduct for Training Cyclists



Riding two abreast Road Rule 151


“Bicycle Riders may not ride more than two abreast unless overtaking,

three wide is permissible 

whilst the passing group is overtaking in single file.”
 


Code of Conduct for Training Cyclists




If riding in the same (lane) please consider other road users and,
if necessary, change to single file to allow drivers to overtake safely.


VicRoads
 









Four Cyclists on Wrong Side of Road


Beach Road Weekend Mornings No Stopping Zone Weekly Hell Ride
Bayside, Melbourne 7.04AM Jan 28th 2012 


Still Photo from Video by Pete Dowe

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuqEm4n4ntE




"Bayside Triathlon Club president Adam Walsh said the club relied on Beach Rd for cycling and running training, and believed smaller pack sizes would reduce accidents.


“Cycling carries a lot of risk on the road,” Mr Walsh said.


“Smaller groups mean the riders within the group are able to respond quicker, are able react quicker, so perhaps limiting pack sizes is a good thing." 


“It also reduces the risk of pack mentality and makes sure everyone who’s riding is safe.”
Mr Walsh said cycling clubs shouldn’t wait around for legislative changes, but should instil these measures themselves.
as it becomes extremely difficult for other cyclists and motorists to ‘pass the bunch’.  



The Code of Conduct for Training Cyclists

         

”when cyclists breach road rules...” in particular the “…cycling specific rule of riding two abreast or three abreast when overtaking, other road users become frustrated and take undue risks and/or show inappropriate aggression often to other cyclists.”



CycleSport Victoria and Amy Gillett Foundation submission to Coroner Graeme Johnstone




Cycling Bunch size also affects stopping distance and the ability to stop safely,


partly by limiting the amount of incompetent riders.



“Probably 80 to 90 per cent of cyclists that are on Beach Road today have a very low set of skills...” 



Marcel Lema, Beach Road Cyclists, 

Stateline 1/9/2006



I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources 



legislate a maximum bunch size of 20 riders to address difficulty stopping safely, 


difficulty overtaking/ passing the bunch, and driver/ cyclist frustration and the taking of undue risks.
 


Pete Dowe
Road Safety Advocate




"A COOLUM cyclist has told of the intimidation on Sunshine Coast bicycle runs dominated by packs of racing riders.

While the battle between cars and cyclists continues, some cyclists are saying the finger should be pointed at those who ride in packs, sometimes three or four abreast.

Jason Gaddes rides his bicycle for leisure and as a mode of transport."








Cyclist says he's fed up with pack mentality on our roads

31st October 2014 6:07 AM

A COOLUM cyclist has told of the intimidation on Sunshine Coast bicycle runs dominated by packs of racing riders. INTIMIDATED: Jason Gaddes says being a cyclist around Coolum can be difficult. Warren Lynam
A COOLUM cyclist has told of the intimidation on Sunshine Coast bicycle runs dominated by packs of racing riders.
While the battle between cars and cyclists continues, some cyclists are saying the finger should be pointed at those who ride in packs, sometimes three or four abreast.
Jason Gaddes rides his bicycle for leisure and as a mode of transport.
He said he was fed up with the "pack mentality" interfering with those looking to enjoy the shared space.
"They sit behind you and it can be intimidating," Mr Gaddes said.
"The groups of cyclists can be riding two or three abreast on David Low Way and they just don't care. They are talking and not watching what's around them and expect you to move out of the way.
RELATED: Lawyer says charges against truckie were 'ridiculous'
"It's like the roads are the packs' outdoor gym."
Mr Gaddes shared his views after the Daily's front page story on a Maroochydore truck driver who was fined for failing to keep a safe distance from a cyclist.
Warwick Fribance, 67, was fined on a "technicality" after police measured the width of Parsons Rd, at Forest Glen, where he had travelled.
Mr Gaddes said no tape measure was necessary to see the reality of the situation on Sunshine Coast roads.
RELATED: OPINION: Should cyclists be made to keep off narrow roads?
"Drivers don't know what to do when they see the group - it's daunting and on narrow roads they don't know where to go," he said.
Under the new minimum-distance passing laws introduced in April, vehicles must give cyclists at least 1.5m clearance when travelling on an 80kmh road such as Parsons Rd.
The fine for failing to comply is $330 and three demerit points.
Sunshine Coast Road Policing Unit acting officer in charge Dave Nelson said officers rarely issued fines for the offence and their aim was to continue to proactively educate drivers on the rules.
RACQ executive manager of technical and safety policy Steve Spalding said it was okay to cross a solid centre line to pass a cyclist if it was safe to do so.
"If in doubt it is better to hold back until the road ahead is clear and avoid the risk of cutting in too close to the cyclist or putting yourself and another vehicle at risk of a head-on crash," Mr Spalding said.
"We encourage all road users to share the road and provide that 'give and take' that helps make the roads safer for everyone. Good courtesy goes a long way to making the road a safer place.
"If the cyclist needs extra space to keep them safe, then the motorist should hang back for a moment or two, and if cyclists are travelling in a large group they should think about how they can work together with other road users to allow safer passing of the group."
Suncoast Cycling Alliance local government advocate Damien Jones said motorists had generally been considerate since the new passing laws came into effect.
The rules
Cyclists can legally ride two abreast
Cyclists are permitted to ride three or more abreast only when overtaking
When riding alongside another rider, there can be no more than 1.5m between cyclists
There is no requirement for a cyclist to maintain a minimum distance from a motor vehicle





http://m.sunshinecoastdaily.com.au/news/racers-cop-a-blast/2438067/



The person who drafted these laws is an Imbecile. The people who passed the law are Imbeciles and likewise any pushbike rider who rides on narrow Qld roads under the auspice of these laws is also an Imbecile. Anyone with two working eyes and half a brain cell can see how narrow most roads other than the wider boulevard type roads around towns actually are. Lets look at the basic Mathematics. Accounting for the fact that a rider will be 400mm from the extreme left edge of bitumen to account for culverts, gutters and broken sections of washed out road, add 500mm for the width of the rider, another 1.5mtrs from supposed legal clearance, then 1.9mtrs for the width of my car (Let alone a bus or truck). That puts my right hand wheel 4.3mtrs from the extreme left of the lane. Put in another rider and add another 2mtrs, making 6.3mtrs Get out with a tape measure and see how wide the lane is, then account for oncoming traffic in the opposite lane. Try the Noosa Eumundi Rd or the road through the Blackall Range for examples. Question - How many dead bike riders will it take, before someone wakes up to the fact that they have seriously screwed up.





WE SAY: Fine line revealed in bike safety laws

31st October 2014 7:45 AM

OUR roads are dangerous places, so any action that makes them safer for road users should be welcome. EVIDENCE: A still from the footage of the truck driven by Warwick Fribance passing the cyclist. A split second before the incident a bus passed the rider also. Contributed
OUR VIEW: OUR roads are dangerous places, so any action that makes them safer for road users should be welcome.
But the state government must keep a close eye on controversial laws it introduced in April on a two-year trial.
The brace of laws were designed to make roads safer for bicycle riders - an attempt to get riders and drivers to appreciate each other's point of view on the road.
So the case of Coast man Warwick Fribance, a 40-year career truck driver, is disappointing. The 67-year-old pleaded guilty to the new law of driving past a cyclist too closely. He immediately declared he would not be driving a truck again.
The July 4 incident, on a narrow hinterland road along a section with double white lines, was filmed by the rider's helmet camera. Mr Fribance, who said he did not see the bicycle, was driving behind a mini-bus. His solicitor called the laws silly, and the magistrate described the charge as technical.
RELATED: Lawyer says charges against truckie were 'ridiculous'
We should not be too quick to apportion blame over the incident. Though the Daily has not yet been able to talk to the rider, anecdotal evidence indicates frustration may have compelled him to complain to police.
And a riders' representative group has even suggested bicyclists should perhaps not ride on certain roads.
The government has to make sure the laws do not worsen the jockeying between riders and drivers.
That would be the real road horror.





http://m.sunshinecoastdaily.com.au/news/fine-line-revealed-in-bike-safety-laws/2437894/


"Under new laws introduced in April, vehicles must give cyclists at least 1.5m clearance on an 80kmh road like Parsons Rd.
Legal aid lawyer Michael Robinson told the court that the truck driven by Mr Fribance may have been only 22cm short of the legal distance away from the cyclist." 

"I would like to say that this is ridiculous but he's been caught out by a technicality of the law," Mr Robinson said.  

"The way that you drove your truck did not cause any interference to the bike rider. It was probably a technical matter," Ms Hennessy said.  

Outside the court, Mr Fribance said he had been unable to remember even passing the cyclist when contacted by police about a week after the incident. 

He said he would have had to steer the 10m tipper across double white lines on a blind hill to have given the cyclist more room. 


Lawyer says charges against truckie were 'ridiculous'






A CYCLIST'S camera and 22cm have brought an end to a Maroochydore truck driver's 40-year career.
Warwick Fribance has decided to give truck driving away after he was charged with failing to keep a safe distance from a cyclist.
His lawyer described the charge as ridiculous and the magistrate regarded it as a "technical matter" when Mr Fribance appeared before Maroochydore Magistrates Court yesterday.
The court heard the cyclist had not been endangered by Mr Fribance's truck on Parsons Rd at Forest Glen on July 7, but it passed closer than the legal minimum distance.




Warwick Fribance was fined for driving too close to a cyclist. Photo: Nicola Brander / Sunshine Coast Daily
Warwick Fribance was fined for driving too close to a cyclist. Photo: Nicola Brander / Sunshine Coast Daily Nicola Brander
The 67-year-old was charged after the cyclist made an online complaint to police which was supported by footage from a helmet-mounted camera.
Police prosecutor Sergeant Leonie Scott told the court that investigating police later measured the road lane at 3.7m and Mr Fribance's truck at 2.43m.
Under new laws introduced in April, vehicles must give cyclists at least 1.5m clearance on an 80kmh road like Parsons Rd.
Legal aid lawyer Michael Robinson told the court that the truck driven by Mr Fribance may have been only 22cm short of the legal distance away from the cyclist.




EVIDENCE: A still from the footage of the truck driven by Warwick Fribance passing the cyclist. A split second before the incident a bus passed the rider also.
EVIDENCE: A still from the footage of the truck driven by Warwick Fribance passing the cyclist. A split second before the incident a bus passed the rider also. Contributed
"I would like to say that this is ridiculous but he's been caught out by a technicality of the law," Mr Robinson said.
Faced with a $330 fine and the loss of three demerit points, Mr Fribance initially decided to contest the charge but reluctantly pleaded guilty after being advised he was unlikely to win.
Magistrate Annette Hennessy did not record a conviction and ordered no further punishment.
"The way that you drove your truck did not cause any interference to the bike rider. It was probably a technical matter," Ms Hennessy said.
Outside the court, Mr Fribance said he had been unable to remember even passing the cyclist when contacted by police about a week after the incident.
He said he would have had to steer the 10m tipper across double white lines on a blind hill to have given the cyclist more room.
"I just feel that the laws are leaning too much the cyclist's way," he said.
He has given away his job because driving is getting "too hard".
"There's a cop behind every tree and now everyone's got a camera," he said.
Mr Fribance said the cyclist had set off that morning "with a helmet on his camera and a chip on his shoulder".
"I hate the idea of him sitting down in the coffee shop sipping on a latte," he said.
CYCLIST: I DON'T WANT TO SEE DRIVERS GET BOOKED
THE head of a Sunshine Coast cycling club says he would prefer to see motorists made aware of minimum passing distances rather than cop fines.
Craig King, the president of the Sunshine Coast Cycling Club, which has about 200 members, many from a racing background, said new minimum passing laws introduced in April had made the roads safer for cyclists but the focus should be on awareness rather than enforcement.
MORE TO COME.





Do you think the truckie was driving too close?

This poll ended on 20 November 2014.

Yes, he was clearly in the wrong. - 16%

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