Saturday, July 11, 2015

Community Safety Cyber Bullying Covert Bullying Anti-Social Vigilantism Defamation Facebook Social Media "needs to be more convictions for cyberbullying to protect victims" Oscar Yildiz Bully Zero Australia Foundation triplejHack JJJFM July 8th 2015 Hyper-Vigilantism Social Exclusion Appropriate Attitudes towards Men Sexism Gender Equality Rule of Law Due Process Gender-Equal Application of the Law Rule of Law IS One Size Fits All Respect of One Person for Another



1.    Oscar Yildiz, CEO of Bully Zero Australia Foundation is stoked with New Zealand’s new tough stance on cyber bullying, but insists we’re covered enough here in Australia.
2.    He says the problem is most people don’t know they can be prosecuted for what they say online.
3.    “Police need more clear powers to prosecute trolls who harass vulnerable people online. There needs to be more convictions to protect victims and prove to kids and adults that it can destroy lives.”


http://www.abc.net.au/triplej/hack/stories/s4269845.htm




LRT: New anti-troll bill in NZ "could criminalise children". Maybe they should teach their kids to not be abusive then.





Online safety expert says New Zealand’s new trolling laws "are a bit nutty”
Online trolls in New Zealand could face up to two years jail under tough new laws.

·
  1. Trolls are no longer welcome in New Zealand.
  2. What?
  3. In a world first, the Kiwi parliament has passed the Harmful Digital Communications Bill outlawing online trolling which is expected to come into effect next Monday.
  4. Mean people could be sent to prison for up to two years for making comments which harass or are "threatening, intimidating, or menacing".
  5. "There need to be more convictions to protect victims"
  6. Kiwis could also face a fine of up to $50,000NZ ($44,787AUD) for posts that are “indecent or obscene” or are deemed “grossly offensive” to a reasonable person who’s affected.
  7. Critics say the laws are too broad and set on criminalising young Kiwis for what could be little more than the “ignorance of youth” and not fully considering the consequences of something posted in the heat of the moment.
  8.  
  9. So should we expect something similar in Australia?
  10. Matthew Keeley, Director of youth legal site lawstuff.org.au says no and the New Zealand laws “are a bit nutty”.
  11. “We would have no need for legislation like New Zealand’s, it would go too far.”
  12. “The real problem is when people complain, police don’t know how to respond and schools don’t know how to respond.”
  13. Under federal law, you can face up to three years jail for using an electronic device to harass, humiliate,offend or consistently troll someone; and up to 10 years for threatening to kill someone online.
  14.  
  15. Oscar Yildiz, CEO of Bully Zero Australia Foundation is stoked with New Zealand’s new tough stance on cyber bullying, but insists we’re covered enough here in Australia.
  16. He says the problem is most people don’t know they can be prosecuted for what they say online.
  17. “Police need more clear powers to prosecute trolls who harass vulnerable people online. There needs to be more convictions to protect victims and prove to kids and adults that it can destroy lives.”

 

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