Thursday, July 9, 2015

Community Safety Cyber Bullying Covert Bullying Fear of Crime "Jill Meagher grief, the catalyst for Brunswick author’s new work" Moreland Leader July 10, 2015 Anti-Social Vigilantism Ignominy by Covert Bullying Defamation Facebook Social Media Sexism Ageism Racism Hyper-Vigilantism Social Exclusion Appropriate Attitudes towards Men Gender Equality Rule of Law Due Process Gender-Equal Application of the Law Rule of Law IS One Size Fits All Respect of One Person for Another


Jill Meagher's rape and murder was an horrific tragedy. I recoil from thought of what her last hours/ minutes of life must have been like. The Parole Board of Victoria failed Jill and Tom Meagher miserably, and indeed the whole of Victoria. Jill Meagher's tragedy must not however be used to justify vigilantism. cyberbullying nor covert bullying.

I argue the authorities need to clarify the meaning of

“If you see something say something” as it has inadvertently “legitimised” vigilantism, the spreading of lies and rumours, covert bullying and cyber bullying.

There is a hyper-vigilant community with vigilantism and what seems to be a perverse notion of “progressive community minded” vigilantism.

“If you see something say something”

See what? Someone you don’t like the look of?

A mis-interpretation of law-abiding behaviour?

Say something to who? Facebook? Other Social Media? Everyone you know and run into?
Many people cannot tell the difference between a photo put on social media by Victoria Police and a photo put online by a cyberbullying vigilante.

Say something to the authorities if you are genuinely concerned.

And leave it at that.

Complainants must be genuine and alerting the authorities of their concerns,

 not vigilantes spreading lies and rumours.

The authorities need to clarify “If you see something say something”

and emphasise that there is no role for vigilantes to play!


Pete Dowe  


"We will not walk in fear of one another. We will not be driven by fear into an age of unreason if we dig deep in our history and our doctrine"


Ed Murrow




"Therefore organisations which promote women walking at night are promoting a high-fear-of-crime group to put itself in a high-fear-of-crime situation. Fine, they have every right to do so. But in this hyper-vigilant, high-fear era, we need to be clear on where the fear is coming from. And re vigilantism, we cannot scapegoat others for our pre-existing fear." Pete Dowe

Fear of Crime. 


This is a curly issue to raise, and although I write about high-fear, I must stress from the outset that VICTIMS DO NOT MAKE PERPETRATORS PERPETRATE, VICTIMS DO NOT ASK FOR IT, and WOMEN HAVE THE RIGHT TO WALK ANYWHERE ANYTIME. I seek here to put perspective on Fear of Crime. The Australian Institute of Criminology defines women as a high-fear of crime group. “A point of some importance is that “high-fear” groups are not especially characterised by age. Rather differences, hold within age groups. Thus, for instance, while it is well established that women are more fearful of crime than men (or at least admit to it more), younger women are more fearful than younger men, as well as older women being more fearful than older men.” The Australian Institute of Criminology also says that fear for “safety on the streets after dark” is a general, non-specific fear.  "The “safety on the streets after dark” question is a very common one in crime surveys, and indeed is sometimes the only one asked. The much higher levels of anxiety among older people in response to this question may well explain why the notion of excessive fear among older people has taken such hold."

"The reason why older people are more fearful about their safety on the streets alone at night is not entirely clear. Note that the question does not mention crime, and it could be that the prospect of being out alone on dark public streets may evoke anxiety about a greater range of mishaps (for example, falling over), especially as the emotional, physical and financial consequences could be worse for older people" (James & Graycar 2000).


"The question is also hypothetical for those who rarely go out alone after dark, which will be the case for many older people. It might also be that “street-crime” affecting older people is particularly overdramatised in the media—and many older people may form their perception of crime through this."


Therefore organisations which promote women walking at night are promoting a high-fear-of-crime group to put itself in a high-fear-of-crime situation. Fine, they have every right to do so. But in this hyper-vigilant, high-fear era, we need to be clear on where the fear is coming from. And re vigilantism, we cannot scapegoat others for our pre-existing fear.


Pete Dowe


Fear of Crime Ch. 4


A Safe and Secure Environment for Older Australians


Marianne James, Adam Graycar and Pat Mayhew


Australian Institute of Criminology Research and Public Policy Series No. 51 2003


http://aic.gov.au/media_library/publications/rpp/51/rpp051.pdf
 


Jill Meagher grief, the catalyst for Brunswick author’s new work

Catherine De Saint Phalle’s book, On Brunswick Ground, follows a group of women after the
Catherine De Saint Phalle’s book, On Brunswick Ground, follows a group of women who discover how tragedy can tighten a community’s bonds. Picture: Adam Elwood

A WOMAN haunted by Jill Meagher’s murder was the catalyst for a Brunswick author’s latest offering.
Catherine De Saint Phalle’s novel On Brunswick Ground follows a group of women who discover how tragedy can tighten a community’s bonds.
HAVE YOUR SAY: Did the death of Jill Meagher bring Brunswick people closer together? Tell us your thoughts below.
De Saint Phalle said she drew on an encounter with her visibly upset French student for the story.
“(The student) was quite distraught and said she couldn’t understand or get over Jill Meagher’s death,” De Saint Phalle said.
“Instead of doing the French lesson, we talked about it and there were other instances of mourning that she hadn’t really dealt with and Jill Meagher’s death had just crystallised it.
“It gave me an idea for a book that I had wanted to write for a while and it was grounded in reality — that tragedy was a moment that linked everyone in Brunswick.”
The story follows a group of women whose lives are characterised by love and loss, and are woven together by their shared grieving of a murder.
De Saint Phalle said she found writing the story to be cathartic, having also experienced her share of grief.
“I have lost a lot of people close to me — I’ve seen a lot of death,” she said.
“When I write about something I draw upon the connections I have with it.”
On Brunswick Ground was released this month and is available in book stores, including Red Wheelbarrow Books at 105 Lygon St, Brunswick East.


http://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/north-west/jill-meagher-grief-the-catalyst-for-brunswick-authors-new-work/story-fnrvvn43-1227435173283





"Therefore organisations which promote women walking at night are promoting a high-fear-of-crime group to put itself in a high-fear-of-crime situation. Fine, they have every right to do so. But in this hyper-vigilant, high-fear era, we need to be clear on where the fear is coming from. And re vigilantism, we cannot scapegoat others for our pre-existing fear." 

Pete Dowe



Fear of Crime. 

This is a curly issue to raise, and although I write about high-fear, I must stress from the outset that VICTIMS DO NOT MAKE PERPETRATORS PERPETRATE, VICTIMS DO NOT ASK FOR IT, and WOMEN HAVE THE RIGHT TO WALK ANYWHERE ANYTIME. I seek here to put perspective on Fear of Crime. The Australian Institute of Criminology defines women as a high-fear of crime group. “A point of some importance is that “high-fear” groups are not especially characterised by age. Rather differences, hold within age groups. Thus, for instance, while it is well established that women are more fearful of crime than men (or at least admit to it more), younger women are more fearful than younger men, as well as older women being more fearful than older men.” The Australian Institute of Criminology also says that fear for “safety on the streets after dark” is a general, non-specific fear.  "The “safety on the streets after dark” question is a very common one in crime surveys, and indeed is sometimes the only one asked. The much higher levels of anxiety among older people in response to this question may well explain why the notion of excessive fear among older people has taken such hold."

"The reason why older people are more fearful about their safety on the streets alone at night is not entirely clear. Note that the question does not mention crime, and it could be that the prospect of being out alone on dark public streets may evoke anxiety about a greater range of mishaps (for example, falling over), especially as the emotional, physical and financial consequences could be worse for older people" (James & Graycar 2000).

"The question is also hypothetical for those who rarely go out alone after dark, which will be the case for many older people. It might also be that “street-crime” affecting older people is particularly overdramatised in the media—and many older people may form their perception of crime through this."

Therefore organisations which promote women walking at night are promoting a high-fear-of-crime group to put itself in a high-fear-of-crime situation. Fine, they have every right to do so. But in this hyper-vigilant, high-fear era, we need to be clear on where the fear is coming from. And re vigilantism, we cannot scapegoat others for our pre-existing fear.
 

Pete Dowe


Fear of Crime Ch. 4

A Safe and Secure Environment for Older Australians

Marianne James, Adam Graycar and Pat Mayhew

Australian Institute of Criminology Research and Public Policy Series No. 51 2003

http://aic.gov.au/media_library/publications/rpp/51/rpp051.pdf

No comments:

Post a Comment