Friday, May 15, 2015

Community Safety Cyber Bullying Covert Bullying Anti-Social Vigilantism Ignominy by Covert Bullying Defamation Racism Facebook Social Media “Teenager Abu Bakar Alam reportedly wins ‘record $500k payout’ after The Age wrongly branded him a terrorist” Herald Sun March 9th 2015 Hyper-Vigilantism Social Exclusion Appropriate Attitudes towards Men Sexism Gender Equality Rule of Law Due Process Gender-Equal Application of the Law Rule of Law IS One Size Fits All Respect of One Person for Another


"Rule of law, equal application of the law, due process, respect of one person for another are necessary for a peaceful productive society" 


Malcolm Fraser



Detective Acting Inspector Allan Price said it was a timely reminder of the perils of social media.

“We would encourage anyone in a similar situation to contact police and report the matter as opposed to turning to social media,” he said.

“Members of the public must not believe everything they read on personal social media pages and refer to reliable sources for their information such as the Victoria Police Facebook page or Victoria Police News.”






“Budget cuts and a 24-hour news cycle undoubtedly put pressure on journalists and publishers,” Mr Zimet said.



“But that does not relieve media organisations of their obligation to ensure that the stories they publish are accurate - particularly around issues such as terrorism.”







Teenager Abu Bakar Alam reportedly wins ‘record $500k payout’ after The Age wrongly branded him a terrorist

Abu Bakar Alam, left, pictured with his father Sher Alam, right.
Abu Bakar Alam, left, pictured with his father Sher Alam, right.

FAIRFAX Media has reportedly paid out one of the largest defamation settlements in Australian media history for publishing a front-page story claiming an innocent teenager was a terrorist.
The Australian’s Sharri Markson reports that The Age’s blunder from editor-in-chief Andrew Holden’s newspaper, in which a picture of Abu Bakar Alam wrongly identified him as a “teenage terrorist” who stabbed two police officers, cost Fairfax a record $500,000 damages.
The maximum payout under the new defamation law is $366,000.
Fairfax wanted to quickly settle the case - one of several defamation suits - off its books without a lengthy and embarrassing trial.
Mr Alam slammed The Age for the “devastating” mistake which put his family in “potential danger”.
Mr Alam even feared he would not be able to pursue his dream of becoming a police officer after his picture was printed on the front of Fairfax newspapers last September.

The Age editor-in-chief Andrew Holden, right, apologises to Abu Bakar Alam at Doveton mos
The Age editor-in-chief Andrew Holden, right, apologises to Abu Bakar Alam at Doveton mosque.
He was incorrectly identified as Numan Haider, the man who stabbed two police officers before he was shot and killed in Endeavour Hills.
“To have my face connected with an act of terrorism on the front pages of major Australian newspapers, and all over the internet, was devastating for me and my family,” Mr Alam said in a statement last week after the settlement was reached.
“This was a terrible mistake that damaged my reputation and my family’s good name. We were forced to defend ourselves against the worst kind of accusations while being placed in potential danger.”
Mr Alam came to Australia from Afghanistan as a refugee eight years ago and said his family had wanted to “escape terrorism” and “live in peace”.
In the paper’s front-page apology on March 4, Mr Holden said: “I have met with Mr Alam and he is an impressive young man. There is no question that he and his family had no association with Haider, or any terrorist activities. On behalf of The Age, I apologise again for the error that we made.”
Slater and Gordon defamation lawyer Jeremy Zimet described The Age’s mistake as “extremely defamatory”.
“Mr Alam was incorrectly associated with terrorism on the front pages of three prominent city newspapers, in two local newspapers, and on the internet,” Mr Zimet said.
The Age took the photo of Mr Alam from Facebook even though the teenager did not have a Facebook account.
“Budget cuts and a 24-hour news cycle undoubtedly put pressure on journalists and publishers,” Mr Zimet said.
“But that does not relieve media organisations of their obligation to ensure that the stories they publish are accurate - particularly around issues such as terrorism.”




http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/law-order/teenager-abu-bakar-alam-reportedly-wins-record-500k-payout-after-the-age-wrongly-branded-him-a-terrorist/story-fni0fee2-1227254785676

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