Sunday, April 5, 2015

Cycling Beach Road Bunch Cycling Bayside Triathlon Club calls for Legislation to limit Cycling Bunch Size Hell Ride “One Hell of a risk CALLS GROW TO BAN BEACH RD PACK RIDING” Mordialloc Chelsea Leader April 1st 2015 Weekly Hell Ride Reckless Negligent Illegal Unofficial Weekly Road Race on Public Roads Beach Road Weekend Mornings No Stopping Zone Melbourne Road Rule 287 Duties of a driver (or rider) involved in an accident Road Rule 126 Difficulty Stopping Road Rule 151 Two Abreast Bunch Size Rec. Max. 20 Riders Rule of Law Equality Cyclists’ Identification Reliable Photo ID No Stopping Zone 'Road Train' Community Safety








Four Cyclists on Wrong Side of Road


Beach Road Weekend Mornings No Stopping Zone Weekly Hell Ride
Bayside, Melbourne 7.04AM Jan 28th 2012 


Still Photo from Video by Pete Dowe

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuqEm4n4ntE




"Bayside Triathlon Club president Adam Walsh said the club relied on Beach Rd for cycling and running training, and believed smaller pack sizes would reduce accidents.


“Cycling carries a lot of risk on the road,” Mr Walsh said.


“Smaller groups mean the riders within the group are able to respond quicker, are able react quicker, so perhaps limiting pack sizes is a good thing."




 
“It is recommended that groups do not exceed 20 cyclists in total
as it becomes extremely difficult for other cyclists and motorists to ‘pass the bunch’.  



The Code of Conduct for Training Cyclists

         

”when cyclists breach road rules...” in particular the “…cycling specific rule of riding two abreast or three abreast when overtaking, other road users become frustrated and take undue risks and/or show inappropriate aggression often to other cyclists.”



CycleSport Victoria and Amy Gillett Foundation submission to Coroner Graeme Johnstone




Cycling Bunch size also affects stopping distance and the ability to stop safely,


partly by limiting the amount of incompetent riders.



“Probably 80 to 90 per cent of cyclists that are on Beach Road today have a very low set of skills...” 



Marcel Lema, Beach Road Cyclists, 

Stateline 1/9/2006



I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources 

legislate a maximum bunch size of 20 riders to address difficulty stopping safely, 

difficulty overtaking/ passing the bunch, and driver/ cyclist frustration.
 


Pete Dowe
Road Safety Advocate






"Insp Cormack said the Hell Riders were more moderate when there was a greater police presence, but he said police ultimately wanted all cyclists to “self-regulate and behave on the roads as they should be”. 







  • Article rank
  • 1 Apr 2015
  • Mordialloc Chelsea Leader
  • Therese Allaoui
One Hell of a risk
CALLS GROW TO BAN BEACH RD PACK RIDING


POLICE have called on Hell Ride cyclists to abandon their “aggressive” weekly rides and stop using Beach Rd as a racetrack. 

Picture: CHRIS EASTMAN Bayside triathletes Merryn Hancox (L) Elaine McNamara, Nicolette Ceppellini, Bill Bardsley, Lexi Craik, Shanan Wright and Karen Gorman urge safer cycling.


And the Bayside Triathlon Club is calling for legislation to prevent pack riding on Beach Rd, where tens of thousands of riders gather every weekend. 

Club president Adam Walsh said the club relied on Beach Rd for cycling and running training, and believed smaller pack sizes would reduce accidents.


“Cycling carries a lot of risk on the road,” Mr Walsh said.


“Smaller groups mean the riders within the group are able to respond quicker, are able react quicker, so perhaps limiting pack sizes is a good thing.


“It also reduces the risk of pack mentality and makes sure everyone who’s riding is safe.”

Mr Walsh said cycling clubs shouldn’t wait around for legislative changes, but should instil these measures themselves.


Moorabbin police acting Inspector John Cormack said “aggressive” and “competitive” Hell Riders using Beach Rd as a racetrack were endangering other road users.


Insp Cormack urged them to “behave like decent road users” and called on those involved to avoid the event completely.


“I don’t think it’s productive; riding in such large numbers has a great deal of risk around it for themselves and other people on the roads.


“When we get groups of 60 to 80 people, they do pose a risk to road users; they can be quite aggressive in nature. We’d hate to see any more serious injuries that are connected with that particular ride.”


Insp Cormack said the Hell Riders were more moderate when there was a greater police presence, but he said police ultimately wanted all cyclists to “self-regulate and behave on the roads as they should be”.


A crash on March 7 left at least eight people injured on Beach Rd after a Hell Rider clipped a cyclist.


The Hell Ride is an informal high-speed cycling race held every Saturday morning from Black Rock to Mt Eliza and can include as many as 200 riders.


Mordialloc state Labor Member Tim Richardson said the Hell Ride was of great concern and he would raise the issue with Victoria Police and relevant ministers. CYCLING etiquette is imperative to keeping all road users safe, according to Bayside Triathlon Club president Adam Walsh.


Mr Walsh said his club urged its members to always implement safe cycling etiquette when riding in groups along busy Beach Rd and he called on other clubs and riders to do the same.


“It’s about giving people space, signalling, giving people room to move, being clear in what you’re doing, be it signalling or calling out obstacles,” Mr Walsh said.


“It’s about being aware there are other people on the road.”

Mr Walsh said having a positive attitude toward other road users was key to safety and good road sharing.


“We don’t yell out, we don’t abuse cars, or other cyclists because that type of behaviour can only lead to confrontation,” he said.


Mr Walsh said all cyclists should become aware of road etiquette and the general road rules.


He suggested the following rules for all riders: Be predictable; brake carefully; point out and call hazards; obey the rules of the road; do not panic if you touch shoulders, hands or bars with another rider when on the road and have ride leaders when riding in small bunches.