Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Cycling Death Fatality "Dooring" "Dooring" related Bike Fall in front of Traffic Sydney Road, Brunswick, Moreland, Melbourne Road Rule 269(3) Vehicle door opened onto Traffic abc.net.au/news Feb. 28th 2015 & Herald Sun/ Leader North-West March 3rd 2015 Strip-Shopping Centre Trams "Check for Bikes" Victorian Taxi Association Advice for Drivers and Riders VicRoads Community Safety and Comment by Pete Dowe Bicycle Alone Accidents Bike Falls Riding on the Footpath or Crossing Bicycle Victoria’s Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria 2002





“Cyclists are much more likely to Die from Bicycle Alone Accidents Bike Falls than Dooring and more likely to be seriously injured by Bike Falls”

Pete Dowe




“Dooring” is a cycling safety issue in the wider community Collisions with car doors opened onto traffic or “dooring” (DCA 163) 

account for one cyclist fatality,

in Victoria during the period June 30th 2004- June 30th 2013  



and 306 serious injuries in Victoria during the period June 30th 2004- June 30th 2013 

according to VicRoads CrashStats.


From Jan 2006 – 31/12/2012 Vic Roads Crash Stats records that there have been


Five cyclist fatalities in its calendar year summary 


from bicycle alone accident, bike falls


  
This also give pause for those of advancing years who believe cycling is healthy low-impact exercise.

 From Jan 2003 – 31/12/2012 Vic Roads Crash Stats also records

325 serious injuries from bicycle alone accidents

 
According to Bicycle Victoria’s Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria (2002)
“Around 80% of all cyclist hospitalisations are for crashes that do not involve motor vehicles."

"All the cyclists who have a crash ‘all by themselves’, called bicycle alone or single vehicle crashes. 


These account for around 80% of all hospitalisations." 



Pete Dowe









 "Check for Bikes"  Victorian Taxi Association

Inside Rear-Passenger Door Silver Top Taxi Melbourne, Victoria, Australia




I commend the TAC for its Rider Reminder Rubber Tabs and also commend the Victorian Taxi Association for its Check for Bikes stickers on the inside of Taxi doors.
I also support signage in strip-shopping centres re "Dooring" as "Dooring" mostly occurs un-surprisingly in strip-shopping centres: with lines of cars and people getting in and out.
Strip-shopping centres are also unsafe routes for cycling particularly where trams are also involved: i.e Sydney Rd, Brunswick St, Chapel St, Glenferrie Rd

“Dooring” is a common cycling accident type “on the radar” with the wider Victorian community,

but as part of the emphasis on other road users’ behaviour not cyclists'.

Collisions with vehicle doors opened onto traffic or “dooring” (DCA 163)* accounts for one cyclist fatality,

and 306 serious injuries in Victoria during the period June 30th 2004- June 30th 2013 according to VicRoads CrashStats.

Yet Nine cyclists were fatally injured riding from the footpath onto the road or a crossing (DCA 148)* in Victoria during the same period June 30th 2004- June 30th 2013 according to VicRoads CrashStats.

There were also 510 cyclists seriously injured riding from the footpath or driveway onto the road or a crossing during the same period.

The lion’s share of these fatalities and serious injuries also occurred to cyclists over 12 years of age riding on the footpath.

Six of the Nine cyclists fatally injured

riding from the footpath onto the road or a crossing DCA 148 in Victoria during the period June 30th 2004- June 30th 2013 according to VicRoads CrashStats

were aged 13 years or above and therefore illegally on the footpath.

394 of the 510 total cyclists seriously injured

riding from the footpath or driveway onto the road or a crossing DCA 147 and DCA 148 during the same period

were aged 13 years or above and therefore illegally on the footpath.

Therefore increasing the legal age limit for cyclists to ride on the footpath above 12 years of age does not better protect cyclists.

Yet riding from the footpath or driveway onto the road or a crossing is not a cycling safety issue in the wider community!


* Police use the Definition for Classifying Accidents (DCA) when reporting the geometry and circumstance of a crash.




Pete Dowe

Road Safety Advocate



Cyclist’s death fuels calls for Sydney Rd infrastructure overhaul

Floral tributes have flowed for the Italian cyclist killed on Sydney Rd.
Tributes flow for an Italian cyclist killed on Sydney Rd. Pictures: Carmelow Bazzano
SYDNEY RD needs to be stripped back and resigned if cycling deaths and accidents are going to be slashed, according to Moreland bicycle and residents’ groups.
Community leaders will meet tomorrow in the wake of Friday’s tragic death of a 25-year-old cyclist in Brunswick, with residents’ and cycling groups calling for safety upgrades to the Brunswick arterial road.
HAVE YOUR SAY: How can safety be improved on Sydney Rd for all road users? Tell us below.
The Italian man was hit by a truck on Sydney Rd after being knocked from his bicycle when a parked motorist opened their car door into his path.
Investigations continue into the death.
Floral tributes lay near the site of the accident, north of Barkly St.
Floral tributes lay near the site of the accident, north of Barkly St.
RELATED:
Alleged dooring death on Sydney Rd
Moreland Bicycle User Group’s deputy convener Ross Millward said Sydney Rd must be redesigned if collisions were to be reduced.
Mr Millward said bike safety must be taken seriously during the road design phase and safety measures built into the system.
“It’s a tragedy for the family, but it’s inevitable when you’ve engineered a system with people parking cars within a door space (to cyclists) and cyclists falling over in the space of a truck,” Mr Millward said.
“It’s up to the engineers, but bikes shouldn’t be an afterthought; they need to be built into the system.
“VicRoads should be feeling really guilty that someone has died: they should have done better.
“It’s impossible to guarantee this ever happening unless we engineer a system with separate spaces.”
Mr Millward said cyclists were encouraged to ride at least the space of an open car door from parked vehicles, but many riders were afraid to ride so close to passing traffic, especially on narrow roads such as Sydney Rd.
He said a clearly marked cyclist safety zone, between parked cars and the traffic lane, would help alleviate the situation.
Ross Millward of Moreland Bicycle User Group.
Ross Millward of Moreland Bicycle User Group.
“Cyclists tend to be scared of traffic so they cycle closer to the cars and drivers feel aggrieved if you come out too far,” he said.
“A marked zone would put bikes in a better place and it would make cars understand.”
Brunswick Residents Network spokesman Nic Maclellan said investment in infrastructure was essential to improving cyclist and pedestrian safety on Sydney Rd.
“Brunswick’s population is growing and with very narrow roads, arterial and residential, we need to manage the traffic coming through Brunswick, and for that reason we need to invest in infrastructure,” Mr Maclellan said.
“It is clear that Brunswick has a high proportion of bike riders and you need to be aware (of that) if you drive a vehicle.
“This is only going to increase as more and more people come to live in the inner city.”
Mr Maclellan said an increasing number of cyclists were being funnelled through suburbs such as Brunswick, Richmond and Fitzroy on their commute into the central business district.
He said education and a change in behaviour from road users was important, but without adequate infrastructure road accidents were sure to continue.
“It’s a multifaceted issue involving people — all users of the road — and we need to recognise each other’s rights,” he said.
“It’s not just about changing attitudes — cyclists have a right to be cycling on Sydney Rd.”
Brunswick state Labor MP Jane Garrett said a meeting between authorities, public transport groups, traders and police would hopefully kick start a strategy to make Sydney Rd safer.
Last week Ms Garrett announced the State Government would spend $1.6 million on safety upgrades between Barkly and Albion streets.
That money will be used to ban right turns and upgrade street lighting and signs.
RELATED:
$1.6 million plan to reduce Sydney Rd accidents
A change.org petition to remove car parking between Weston and Barkly streets is also gaining traction with more than 1500 people adding their name to the campaign.
Ms Garrett said all options were up for discussion, including Moreland Council’s Brunswick Integrated Traffic Strategy, which was passed last year.
“We have to find a way to coexist,” Ms Garrett said.
“This is not just an issue for Sydney Rd, it’s one for Victoria.
“Everything is up for discussion. This (meeting) will be the start of an ongoing discussion. Every group has its part to play.”
VicRoads Metro North West Regional Director Adam Maguire confirmed the roads authority would attend the meeting.
“VicRoads was very saddened to hear about the unfortunate cyclist fatality on Sydney Rd last Friday,” Mr Maguire said.
“As announced by Jane Garrett MP recently, VicRoads will be delivering road safety improvements along Sydney Rd between Albion St and Barkly St on behalf of the Victorian Government.
“These upgrades are aimed at improving safety for cyclists and other road users.
“The works will include the banning of right turns at certain intersections, upgrades to lighting and signage to alert drivers to the heavy presence of cyclists and pedestrians and extensions and improvements to bicycle facilities.”
Brunswick state Labor MP Jane Garrett on Sydney Rd.
Brunswick state Labor MP Jane Garrett on Sydney Rd.


http://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/north-west/cyclists-death-fuels-calls-for-sydney-rd-infrastructure-overhaul/story-fnrvvn43-1227246460230








Brunswick cyclist death: 'Car-dooring' fatality prompts calls for motorists to pay more attention

Updated

A car-dooring that allegedly led to the death of a cyclist on a notorious Melbourne road has revived warnings from bicycle advocates that motorists are not paying enough attention.
The 25-year-old Italian cyclist was cycling south on Sydney Road in Brunswick just after 4:00pm when a person in a parked car allegedly opened their door, knocking him onto the road.
The cyclist was struck by a passing truck and died at the scene, police said.
Bicycle Network Victoria (BNV) spokesman Garry Brennan said while the majority of motorists were becoming more aware about the dangers of dooring cyclists, some people were ignoring the safety messages.
"We're optimistic that we're getting on top of the dooring problem, but you can never relent for one moment," he said.
"There are thousands and thousands of people getting in and out of cars, and they're simply not paying enough attention."
Sydney Road is a notorious stretch of road for cyclists, who must navigate trams, cars and pedestrians.


The official figures show about three serious accidents a week involving a car door, but that's really just the tip of the iceberg.

Greens Leader Greg Barber

It has one of the highest accident rates for cyclists in the state, prompting police and VicRoads to conduct an "enforcement and awareness" campaign over the summer.
Senior Constable Sarah O'Keefe said road users needed to be more aware of each other.
"We have been working tirelessly trying to get that message across," she said
But Victorian Greens Leader Greg Barber said Friday's fatality highlighted the need for a better campaign to raise awareness of driving safely around cyclists.
"Unfortunately these type of accidents happen all the time," he said.
"The official figures show about three serious accidents a week involving a car door, but that's really just the tip of the iceberg as any cyclist will tell you."

'Unfortunate' Sydney Road upgrades were not made sooner: BNV


Last week, the State Government announced a $1.6 million package to make riding and walking along the road safer.
The package includes banning right turns at 17 intersections and increasing off-street parking to reduce the number of doorings.
Mr Brennan said the work should be completed next year.
"[Sydney Road] is a risky area for bike riders and for pedestrians, but the plans are already underway and it's unfortunate that we couldn't get this work done earlier," he said.
Floral tributes have been placed at the scene of the fatality.

First posted



http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-02-28/car-dooring-death-prompts-calls-for-motorists-to-pay-attention/6270802



Road Rule 269(3) of the Victorian Road Safety Road Rules 2009 states it is an offence to cause a hazard to a person or a vehicle by opening a car door, leaving a door of a vehicle open, or getting off, or out of, a vehicle.



Advice for riders

  • Look out for drivers and passengers getting in and out of parked cars.
  • Be vigilant when riding alongside parked cars and ride out of the car door zone (if possible and safe to do so).
  • If you are riding on a length of road with a marked bicycle lane, you must ride in the bicycle lane unless it is impracticable to do so.
  • In places where there are a lot of parked cars, slow down.
  • Wear bright coloured clothing and use lights at night or in conditions of low light.
  • Share the road safely.


Advice for drivers

Bike riders are legitimate road users, and are therefore entitled to use the road just the same as any other road user. Car drivers and bike riders should share the road safely and look out for each other.
  • Get into the habit of always using your mirrors and doing a head check before opening your car door (one way to do this is to open the car door with your left hand)
  • Bike riders can travel quickly and may be much closer than you think
  • When getting into your car, face the oncoming traffic so you can see bike riders (and other road users) travelling towards you. Do not open your car door until they have passed.
  • Bike riders can ride between parked cars and the lane of traffic so, as a passenger, do not get out of a stationary car when in moving traffic.
  • Check out the following animation Checking for cyclists and motorcyclists [Video] (External link) for further information about how to be more aware of cyclists when opening your car door.
  • Share the road safely.

 

No comments:

Post a Comment