Sunday, February 1, 2015

Cycling Beach Road Bunch Cycling 'Cyclists riding in groups cause problems, rule changes needed': WA Premier Colin Barnett ABC News online Jan. 29th 2015 Negligence Group Responsibility Road Rule 126 Difficulty Stopping, Road Rule 151 Two Abreast and Bunch Size Rec. Max. 20 Riders VIDEO Hell Ride Comment by Pete Dowe Community Safety



Hell Ride, Beach Road, Bayside, Melbourne

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuqEm4n4ntE




Cyclists riding in groups cause problems, rule changes needed: WA Premier Colin Barnett

Updated
Cyclists travelling in large groups of up to four abreast are causing problems for other road users, WA Premier Colin Barnett says.
Mr Barnett has ruled out supporting a proposed law to force drivers to leave a minimum one-metre gap when passing a cyclist, but has flagged changes to road rules and protocols.
Asked which rules he planned to change, Mr Barnett said he would take advice on that.
"But even just this morning, going down for an early morning swim, I saw one group of cyclists in a line behaving perfectly, I saw another group three abreast... and that was causing conflict, so that is happening right across the city," he said.
"Over this summer, having a holiday and watching, you get large groups of cyclists, maybe 50 or 60 in a group, sometimes two, three, four wide on the road, now that's not working.
"There's been a lot of aggression both from motorists and from cyclists.
"We need to, if not change the laws, we certainly need to have well-established protocols for the use of cycling athletes using our road system.
"I don't want to discourage that, I want to encourage people to be out there exercise, keep fit, enjoy their sport but at the moment there's conflict between that and traditional road users."

Infrastructure needs updating: Premier

He said it was not just a matter of changing rules but also the infrastructure provided for cyclists and other road users, particularly where new roads or developments were built.
"If you look at our cycle paths, they've been put in place since the early 90s - good concept but you don't find people who are cycling for fitness and for their sport using these paths because they are travelling at 30 to 40, up to 50kph so that is inherently dangerous.
"That's incompatible you can't ride a bike down a dual use path at 30 or 40kph that is as dangerous as behaviour on the roads.
"The usage of our roads has changed and therefore our road and transport system needs to change to accommodate that."
Earlier this week Transport Minister Dean Nalder said it was legal for cyclists to ride two abreast, but there was an issue between legality and courtesy.
"There is a safely issue around bikes being more visible so they can ride on the left hand side of the road two abreast and do that legally, however if they're holding up traffic I think out of courtesy it's nice for them to move to single file to let traffic through," he said.
"So I think that we need to encourage more courteous behaviour on our roads but raise that awareness both for drivers and cyclists."
First posted

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-01-29/wa-premier-says-cyclists-in-groups-causing-problems-on-roads/6054352
















Raisin-Shaw's decision proved to be wrong, but in the circumstances it "was not unreasonable", Mr Sharpley said.


Mr Sharpley accepted that his client had contributed to Mr Gould's death but argued his actions were "not indicative of any significant DEGREEhttp://cdncache-a.akamaihd.net/items/it/img/arrow-10x10.png of negligence".

"The alternative of proceeding through the red signal appeared to be the lesser of the two evils, 

on the basis that it was unlikely that a pedestrian would walk out in front of cyclists approaching at speed," he said.




the magistrate noted that Raisin-Shaw was only charged with disobeying the traffic signal.

The maximum penalty for the offence was a $550 fine, but Raisin-Shaw's lawyer, 

Michael Sharpley, asked the magistrate to take into ACCOUNT THEhttp://cdncache-a.akamaihd.net/items/it/img/arrow-10x10.png difficult group dynamics 

of the ride in determining the penalty.

"I'm now going to impose what everybody would consider a pathetic fine of $400," he said.










Comment by Pete Dowe





I argue that the “Victorian Government Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources


"has a duty of care to ensure that reasonable action is taken to minimise the risk of harm to anyone who is reasonably likely to be affected by the department's activities.”


I argue that the Victorian Government Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources

“may be found to be negligent where a failure to take reasonable care results in some injury or loss.”


I argue it is negligent for a cycling bunch to be a “No Stopping Zone”
as it affects the safety of all road users and bunch cyclists have a duty of care to each other

and other road users to keep a safe stopping distance behind the bicycle vehicle in front
and to form cycle bunches which can stop safely.

I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources

legislate such a collective responsibility, duty of care, to stop safely

on the part of riders participating in a cycling bunch.



Cycling Bunch size also affects stopping distance and the ability to stop safely,

partly by limiting the amount of incompetent riders.



“Probably 80 to 90 per cent of cyclists that are on Beach Road today have a very low set of skills...” 

Marcel Lema, Beach Road Cyclists, 

Stateline 1/9/2006



The Code of Conduct for Training Cyclists recommends a maximum bunch size of 20 riders.

I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources


legislate a maximum bunch size of 20 riders to address difficulty stopping safely.


The CycleSport Victoria and Amy Gillett Foundation submission to Coroner Johnstone’s inquest into the death of Pedestrian James Gould stated:

“The evidence establishes that there can be difficulties,
especially for inexperienced cyclists, in stopping safely 
when traffic lights are red, when they are riding in bunches.”

There is no required standard to achieve before bunch cycling on the road.

There are “No formal training programs to develop bunch riding skills...”
Monash University Accident Research Centre (2009)

Bunch cyclists form bunches which likely cannot stop safely,
cannot stop without rear-ending the cyclist in front,

and the fear of being rear-ended is then used
as a justification for cyclists proceeding through red traffic signals.

It ought not be.

I argue it is negligent for a cycling bunch to be a “No Stopping Zone”
as it affects the safety of all road users and bunch cyclists have a duty of care to each other and other road users

to keep a safe stopping distance behind the bicycle vehicle in front
and to form cycle bunches which can stop safely.

I argue that bunch cyclists also do not stop safely and proceed through red traffic signals because

there is no group responsibility.

I advocate that there be such a group responsibility in bunch cycling, 

and that all riders in the bunch be responsible for the bunch being able to stop safely.

I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources

legislate such a collective responsibility, duty of care, to stop safely

on the part of riders participating in a cycling bunch.

Cycling Bunch size also affects stopping distance and the ability to stop safely,

partly by limiting the amount of incompetent riders.



“Probably 80 to 90 per cent of cyclists that are on Beach Road today have a very low set of skills...” 

Marcel Lema, Beach Road Cyclists, 

Stateline 1/9/2006

The Code of Conduct for Training Cyclists recommends a maximum bunch size of 20 riders.

I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources


legislate a maximum bunch size of 20 riders to address difficulty stopping safely.



Pete Dowe
Road Safety Advocate



http://petedoweroadsafetyadvocate.blogspot.com.au/2014/10/cycling-beach-road-bunch-cycling_14.html



Hell Ride, Beach Road, Bayside, Melbourne

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuqEm4n4ntE

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