Thursday, December 11, 2014

Community Safety Toddler Death Fatality Melbourne, Victoria 3 y.o Four Children Seriously Ill Cosmetic Milk Contotroversy Still On Sale & Editorial 'Milking the Law on Milk' Herald Sun Dec 11th & Dec 12th 2014


Cosmetic milk controversy: State in grip of toxic milk madness


  • GRANT MCARTHUR AND CHANEL KINNIBURGH
  • HERALD SUN
  • DECEMBER 12, 2014 8:46AM
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Child dies from contaminated cow's milk
http://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/external?url=http://content6.video.news.com.au/I4Z3A3cjovHuggEaX-7qCvwJku-s0ODo/promo242518861&width=650&api_key=kq7wnrk4eun47vz9c5xuj3mc
SCORES of Melbourne stores are still selling dangerous unpasteurised milk beside drinks, despite revelations that one child died and another four became seriously ill after drinking it.
The Herald Sun found at least 10 inner-suburban stores selling “cosmetic” or “bath” milk yesterday. Despite the products not being for human consumption, most were in traditional milk bottles, on shelves beside ordinary milk and yoghurt.
And dozens of raw milk drinkers contacted the Herald Sun to say they would continue to drink it in the belief it was healthful, ignoring clear warnings from Victorian health officials of the possibly deadly risks.
The Federal Government said it was willing to crack down on killer bath milk. The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission has begun an urgent investigation of the milk’s packaging, which, despite labelling that unpasteurised milk should not be consumed, is similar to that of normal drinking milk.
Melbourne stores are still selling dangerous unpasteurised milk beside drinks.
Melbourne stores are still selling dangerous unpasteurised milk beside drinks.
Consumer Affairs Minister Bruce Billson told the Herald Sun that he had major concerns about the products.
Premier Daniel Andrews said he also was unsatisfied with the regulations surrounding the widespread sale of unpasteurised milk.
As revealed by the Herald Sun, a three-year-old Mornington Peninsula child died and four other young children became seriously ill in recent weeks after drinking unpasteurised milk being sold in Victoria.
The sale of untreated cow’s milk for human consumption is illegal in Australia owing to its high risk of contamination; however, many brands are legally sold “cosmetic” products.
But yesterday stores in Malvern, Carlton, Fitzroy, Balaclava, Thornbury, Elsternwick, Albert Park, Box Hill and Belgrave all stocked it near other food items.
The Herald Sun’s front page photo today was taken at an organic food shop in Fitzroy.
Despite disclaimers that the milk was not for human consumption, one owner told the Herald Sun he was a regular drinker of the milk.
“It’s real food in its natural form. There is more nutrition in raw milk and it’s good for you, if it’s not contaminated,” the man said.
Another shop owner admitted selling it in the knowledge customers were drinking it.
“You’d need a lot of it for a bath, and it’s $10 a bottle.”
Vicki Jones, the owner of Mountain View Farm in Longwarry — which produced the “Organic Bath Milk” that was drunk by the toddler who died — has now promised to change the milk’s labelling to make it clearer that it is not for human consumption.
Ms Jones maintained that her milk was sold only as a cosmetic product, despite admitting she drank it herself.
“We label it ‘for cosmetic purposes’. It’s a requirement from the Health Department.
“If people ask us if it’s safe to drink, we tell them it’s bath milk,” she said.
Asked why it was packaged like regular milk and stocked in food stores, Ms Jones said that it was “not something you think about”.
Ms Jones said Health Department testing of samples of the milk had come back clear.
Ms Jones, 46, denied taking part in an online conversation at the Nourished Magazine website discussing the benefits of drinking untreated milk.
“I wasn’t involved with any conversations to do with consuming raw milk,” she said.


Additional reporting: Jessica Marszalek and Holly McKay.



http://m.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/cosmetic-milk-controversy-state-in-grip-of-toxic-milk-madness/story-fni0fit3-1227153185217?sv=2be4cded3a5e81f30214b619a147481b&utm_source=Herald%20Sun&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=editorial&net_sub_uid=110365919





Herald Sun Editorial



Milking the law on milk
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  • HERALD SUN
  • DECEMBER 11, 2014 9:00PM
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A three-year-old’s death from unpasteurised milk has raised calls for it to be banned.
A three-year-old’s death from unpasteurised milk has raised calls for it to be banned.
UNPASTEURISED milk, which is believed to have caused the death of a three-year-old child and serious illness in four other children, should be removed from health food stores immediately.
It is not enough for the companies producing the milk, which can contain harmful bacteria, to say it is clearly labelled as bath milk for cosmetic use only and not for human consumption.
There are many people who believe it is their right to drink milk in its natural state and that the warning is merely a nod and a wink to ignore the law.
This is a reckless and misguided attitude by those prepared to risk not only their own health but that of their children. The raw milk is sold in the same type of containers as pasteurised milk, which has had bacteria removed by the process developed by Louis Pasteur, known as “the father of microbiology” and credited with saving thousands of lives. A clearly concerned Victorian Health Department has issued a major health warning following yesterday’s page 1 report in theHerald Sun, and the State Coroner will investigate the death of the three-year-old who died after drinking the milk.
Further action is proving difficult although the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission and Consumer Affairs Victoria have been asked to address the matter.
Much of this is mere buck-passing and the attitude of Mountain View Farm owner Vicki Jones is not much better. While confirming that the Health Department has taken samples of her company’s milk, she said it was clearly labelled for cosmetic use and parents were irresponsible if they gave the milk to their children.
Raw milk can be sold at the farm gate in New Zealand in limited quantities, but the law there is being reviewed after an increase in illness where raw milk is a factor.
There is a market among some people for raw or natural milk they see as posing no harm. This view is much the same as that taken by parents who refuse to have their children immunised and is a reminder of an extreme reaction to fluoride when it was introduced to drinking water to protect people’s teeth. Not everyone who drinks unpasteurised milk and gives it to their children is a hippy, wearing beads and a kaftan.
There is a loophole in the law, which Mountain View Farm might deny it is exploiting, but which provides an opportunity to buy unpasteurised milk, which has been banned for human consumption in Victoria for 70 years.
This law had to overcome opposition and came decades after Pasteur’s lifesaving research in the 19th century.
Mountain View’s Ms Jones said of the warning on her company’s containers: “We can’t do much more than that.’’
The Victorian Health Department, the ACCC, Consumer Affairs Victoria and any other regulatory body that has a stake in protecting children from possible bacterial disease should do more than that.

Cleopatra supposedly bathed in donkey’s milk and might have been ass enough to drink it. But that was before pasteurisation.



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