Sunday, November 9, 2014

Cycling and Walking Cyclists running red lights: Victoria Police vow to continue crackdown Herald Sun Nov. 9th 2014 Cycling Safety Community Safety


"Cyclists who break the law are much more likely to be killed or seriously injured."


Bicycle Victoria's Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria (2002)

 

"What needs to be done is more policing … we need 

to have a more consistent policing approach to 

make it really hard for these people to behave the 

way they do."


Harry Barber 

CEO Bicycle Network Victoria/ Bicycle Victoria


 


“You can’t expect not to be subject to the law
 
if you want to be treated equally”



 
Klaus Mueller, President, CycleSport Victoria

Mordialloc Chelsea Leader May 18th 2009


“It’s only fair that all vehicle users are treated equally”

 

Gary Brennan, Bicycle Victoria

Mordialloc Chelsea Leader May 18th 2009


http://mordialloc-chelsea-leader.whereilive.com.au/news/story/road-law-breakers-risk-going-to-jail/






“It’s so easy to put on a helmet and the consequences for not using one 

and falling off your bike are so high it makes no sense to ride without one,” 








Bike Falls may be Fatal


Pete Dowe

Law & Order

Cyclists running red lights: Police vow to continue crackdown

ALEKS DEVIC

Cyclists run a red light at Docklands.
Cyclists run a red light at Docklands.

CYCLISTS are playing red-light ROULETTE on our roads with almost 5000 riders caught racing through intersections and ignoring road signs.
Police have vowed to continue running road blitzes to nab more rogue cyclists in a desperate bid to reduce crashes and end the rider-versus-driver war on our roads.
Victoria Police figures obtained by the Herald Sun reveal the number of red-light runners nabbed jumped by 30 per cent to 900 in 2013-14, compared to 682 the previous year.

A cyclist rides past a stopped tram in Melbourne’s CBD. Picture: Hamish Blair
A cyclist rides past a stopped tram in Melbourne’s CBD. Picture: Hamish Blair
Melbourne’s CBD was the hot spot followed by Yarra and Moreland, which have popular cycle routes throughout Richmond, Clifton Hill, Fitzroy, ­Coburg and Brunswick.
Port Phillip and Stonnington, which have Chapel St, Beac­onsfield Parade, Fitzroy St, Beach Rd, St Kilda Rd and Toorak Rd running through them, also make the top five.
The number of cyclists failing to put the brakes on at signs more than doubled, ­rising to 300.
Going without a helmet. Picture: Valeriu Campan
Going without a helmet. Picture: Valeriu Campan
In the past five years, 28,070 cyclists have been BOOKED FOR riding without helmets, 5422 of them in the past year.
Cyclists face the same fines as DRIVERS for running red lights and are penalised $369.
Motorists also incur three demerit points for running a red light but because cyclists do not have licences, they avoid losing the points.
Going through a red light in the CBD. Picture: Valeriu Campan
Going through a red light in the CBD. Picture: Valeriu Campan
Those caught riding without a helmet are fined $185.

Victoria Police Sergeant Arty Lavos said he was disappointed that during the past five years, 4841 had run red lights  or  ignored  traffic  signs.

“The vast majority of ­cyclists, like the vast majority of motorists, do the right thing and obey the road rules. Our message to those who don’t is you can be caught anywhere at anytime,” he said.

He said even though fines for not using helmets had dropped, it remained the biggest road-safety issue for ­cyclists.

“It’s so easy to put on a helmet and the consequences for not using one and falling off your bike are so high it makes no sense to ride without one,” Sgt Lavos said.

VicRoads is undertaking a review of cycling laws in a bid to make the roads safer.

Rules being considered are allowing cyclists to treat red lights like give way signs, 

requiring ­motorists to be 1m from ­cyclists, allowing teenagers to ride on footpaths 

and banning riding with headphones.

Twitter: @AleksDevic


http://m.heraldsun.com.au/news/law-order/cyclists-running-red-lights-police-vow-to-continue-crackdown/story-fni0fee2-1227117604271?sv=c09bfd25cf02f361f193fe491f47c08&&net_sub_uid=110365919




"Premier Denis Napthine said he would be concerned about a proposal 

  to allow cyclists to run red lights."

  Herald Sun 12.9.14




I argue it is negligent for a cycling bunch to be a “No Stopping Zone”

as it affects the safety of all road users and bunch cyclists have a duty of care to each other

and other road users to keep a safe stopping distance behind the bicycle vehicle in front

and to form cycle bunches which can stop safely.



I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local 

Infrastructure’s legislate such a collective responsibility, duty of care, to stop safely


on the part of riders participating in a cycling bunch.


Pete Dowe
Road Safety Advocate



This blog strongly opposes certain reforms

VicRoads is currently considering:

“under one suggested reform, 


cyclists could be allowed to treat red lights as Give Way signs. 

And the same could also APPLY  at pedestrian lights."   
Also


"PERMITTING cyclists, riding cautiously, to proceed past a stationary tram;"


"ALLOWING all riders to use the footpath, provided that they give way to pedestrians."


Herald Sun 12.9.14



Pete Dowe

Road Safety Advocate
















Beach Road, Mentone Lifesaving Club Pedestrian Crossing 8.23AM March 20th 2010 

Photos by Pete Dowe

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWApp-huwe8




Bicycle Brake Reaction Time means the time a cyclist needs to -


• see a danger ahead;
• perceive what it means;
• decide on a response; and
• instigate that response,



when the bicycle continues to travel at is velocity.
A cyclist who is concentrating will have a Bicycle Brake Reaction Time of about 2½ seconds to react

to 'instigate a response' by squeezing his/her brake levers according to different, 

previously determined, pressure levels for the front and rear brakes when in an emergency situation.






Bicycle Brake Reaction Distance means the distance a bicycle travels, prior to applying the brakes, whilst a cyclist -

• sees a danger ahead;
• perceives what it means;
• decides on a response; and
• instigates that response by applying the brakes.

A cyclist who is concentrating will have a Brake Reaction Time of about 2½ seconds to apply his/her brake levers in an emergency situation.  By using the Bicycle Brake Stop Calculatorif the cyclist is travelling at 40 km p/h which equates to 11.11 metres p/s, the Bicycle Brake Response Distance would be 27.78m.




Pedal power: VicRoads considers allowing cyclists to run red lights

Bike riding in the city

http://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/external?url=http://content6.video.news.com.au/llbzVhbDoPrDsynnsoohnXyMT4QgW3_a/promo219551587&width=650&api_key=kq7wnrk4eun47vz9c5xuj3mc
CYCLISTS could be permitted to run red lights and DRIVERS be banned from entering bike lanes at all in a bid to get more riders on Victorian roads.
The measures are among reforms being considered to make the roads more bike-friendly and reduce conflict with motorists.
VicRoads has begun to examine results from a recent online SURVEY of the state’s cycling road rules.
And a full report on a possible overhaul of the state’s road rules is due to be released by the end of this year.
The Herald Sun can reveal the following options are on the Government’s radar:
BANNING cyclists’ use of headphones;
ALLOWING motorcyclists to share bike lanes with cyclists;
REQUIRING motorists to be 1m away from cyclists;
ALLOWING cyclists to treat red lights like Give Way signs;
PERMITTING cyclists, riding cautiously, to proceed past a stationary tram;
ALLOWING those aged 12-17 to ride on a footpath if with a child aged under 12;
LETTING cyclists with kids under 10 in a trailer or child seat to use the footpath; and
ALLOWING all riders to use the footpath, provided that they give way to pedestrians.
Drivers could be banned from entering bike lanes under the reforms being considered. Cycl
DRIVERS could be banned from entering bike lanes under the reforms being considered. Cyclists on Princes Bridge. Picture: Brendan Francis.
Currently, cyclists must stop at red lights or be liable to the same fine as motorist.
Cyclists who run red lights have become one of motorists’ biggest pet hates.
But under one suggested reform, cyclists could be allowed to treat red lights as Give Way signs. And the same could also apply at pedestrian lights.
The reforms could also see motorists banned from entering the bike lane under any circumstances. Currently, DRIVERS can enter bike lanes for up to 50m in order to park or turn.
VicRoads’ Sharon Duijkers-Mahood said any new laws would be aimed at making Victoria more bike-friendly.
“The range of road rules which relate to or affect bike riders will be examined,” Ms Duijkers-Mahood said.
“The aim is to determine whether the cycling-related road rules and legislation for bike riders are working as well as they should be and, if necessary, make recommend­ations on how they can be ­improved or better communicated to ensure the safety of bike riders and encourage more people to ride.”

Premier Denis Napthine today said he would be concerned about a proposal to allow cyclists to run red lights.
VicRoads CEO John Merritt aid the SURVEY results were still being processed.

“Any of the concepts that come out of this SURVEY will be the subject of significant consultation across the broader Victorian population” he said
Laws APPLYING to cyclists have been tightened over the past decade.

Penalties apply if cyclists do not stop behind stationary trams, and fines for running red lights and not wearing bike helmets have increased.


http://m.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/pedal-power-vicroads-considers-allowing-cyclists-to-run-red-lights/story-fni0fit3-1227055875630?sv=694137fd961746992a5dfdbe55d4f70d&&net_sub_uid=110365919


I argue that the “Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure


"has a duty of care to ensure that reasonable action is taken to minimise the risk of harm to anyone who is reasonably likely to be affected by the department's activities.”


I argue that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure

“may be found to be negligent where a failure to take reasonable care results in some injury or loss.”


I argue it is negligent for a cycling bunch to be a “No Stopping Zone”
as it affects the safety of all road users and bunch cyclists have a duty of care to each other

and other road users to keep a safe stopping distance behind the bicycle vehicle in front
and to form cycle bunches which can stop safely.

I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local 

Infrastructure’s legislate such a collective responsibility, duty of care, to stop safely

on the part of riders participating in a cycling bunch.



Cycling Bunch size also affects stopping distance and the ability to stop safely,

partly by limiting the amount of incompetent riders.

The Code of Conduct for Training Cyclists recommends a maximum bunch size of 20 riders.

I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure’s


legislate a maximum bunch size of 20 riders to address difficulty stopping safely.


The CycleSport Victoria and Amy Gillett Foundation submission to Coroner Johnstone’s inquest into the death of Pedestrian James Gould stated:

“The evidence establishes that there can be difficulties,
especially for inexperienced cyclists, in stopping safely 
when traffic lights are red, when they are riding in bunches.”

“Probably 80 to 90 per cent of cyclists that are on Beach Road today have a very low set of skills...”

Marcel Lema, Beach Road Cyclists


Stateline 1/9/2006

There is no required standard to achieve before bunch cycling on the road.

There are “No formal training programs to develop bunch riding skills...”
Monash University Accident Research Centre (2009)

Bunch cyclists form bunches which likely cannot stop safely,
cannot stop without rear-ending the cyclist in front,

and the fear of being rear-ended is then used
as a justification for cyclists proceeding through red traffic signals.

It ought not be.

I argue it is negligent for a cycling bunch to be a “No Stopping Zone”
as it affects the safety of all road users and bunch cyclists have a duty of care to each other

and other road users to keep a safe stopping distance behind the bicycle vehicle in front
and to form cycle bunches which can stop safely.

I argue that bunch cyclists also do not stop safely and proceed through red traffic signals because

there is no group responsibility.

I advocate that there be such a group responsibility in bunch cycling, 

and that all riders in the bunch be responsible for the bunch being able to stop safely.

I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local 

Infrastructure’s legislate such a collective responsibility, duty of care, to stop safely

on the part of riders participating in a cycling bunch.


Cycling Bunch size also affects stopping distance and the ability to stop safely,

partly by limiting the amount of incompetent riders.


“Probably 80 to 90 per cent of cyclists that are on Beach Road today have a very low set of skills...”

Marcel Lema, Beach Road Cyclists


Stateline 1/9/2006


The Code of Conduct for Training Cyclists recommends a maximum bunch size of 20 riders.

I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure’s


legislate a maximum bunch size of 20 riders to address difficulty stopping safely.




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