Sunday, October 19, 2014

Cycling PHOTO Beach Road Bunch Cycling 'Road Train' Bayside, Melbourne 7.25AM 13.2.10 Negligence Road Rule 126 Difficulty Stopping Road Rule 151 Two Abreast Sideswipe No Stopping Zones



Photo by Pete Dowe



Riding two abreast

Tip: When riding two abreast bike riders cannot (as stated) ride more than two abreast in any single marked lane on that road

(unless, as stated, overtaking another bike rider) but may ride more than two abreast across multiple lanes.

If riding in the same (lane) please consider other road users and,
if necessary, change to single file to allow drivers to overtake safely.

VicRoads




Riding two abreast

Road Rule 151: Bike riders must not ride alongside more than one other rider in a single marked lane or on any part of a road that is not a multi-lane road unless the bike rider is overtaking another bike rider.

On multi-lane roads, marked lane (and regardless of whether the road is a multi-lane road or any other sort of road), bike riders in that marked lane must not ride more than 1.5 metres apart.

Tip: When riding two abreast bike riders cannot (as stated) ride more than two abreast in any single marked lane on that road

(unless, as stated, overtaking another bike rider) but may ride more than two abreast across multiple lanes.

If riding in the same please consider other road users and, if necessary, change to single file to allow drivers to overtake safely.

VicRoads

Road Rule 247. Riding in a bicycle lane on a road

The rider of a bicycle riding on a length of road with a bicycle lane designed for bicycles travelling
in the same direction as the rider must ride in the bicycle lane unless it is impracticable to do so.

Lane markings

Rule: A bike rider must use the bicycle lane if there is a bicycle lane on a length of road in the same direction as they are riding
(unless there are obstacles in their way, i.e. parked cars, debris etc).

VicRoads

http://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/Home/SafetyAndRules/SaferRiders/BikeRiders/RoadRulesAndFines.htm


I argue that the “Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure


"has a duty of care to ensure that reasonable action is taken to minimise the risk of harm to anyone who is reasonably likely to be affected by the department's activities.”


I argue that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure

“may be found to be negligent where a failure to take reasonable care results in some injury or loss.”


I argue it is negligent for a cycling bunch to be a “No Stopping Zone”
as it affects the safety of all road users and bunch cyclists have a duty of care to each other

and other road users to keep a safe stopping distance behind the bicycle vehicle in front
and to form cycle bunches which can stop safely.

I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local 

Infrastructure’s legislate such a collective responsibility, duty of care, to stop safely

on the part of riders participating in a cycling bunch.



Cycling Bunch size also affects stopping distance and the ability to stop safely,

partly by limiting the amount of incompetent riders.


“Probably 80 to 90 per cent of cyclists that are on Beach Road today have a very low set of skills...” 

Marcel Lema, Beach Road Cyclists, 

Stateline 1/9/2006



The Code of Conduct for Training Cyclists recommends a maximum bunch size of 20 riders.

I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure’s


legislate a maximum bunch size of 20 riders to address difficulty stopping safely.


The CycleSport Victoria and Amy Gillett Foundation submission to Coroner Johnstone’s inquest into the death of Pedestrian James Gould stated:

“The evidence establishes that there can be difficulties,
especially for inexperienced cyclists, in stopping safely 
when traffic lights are red, when they are riding in bunches.”

There is no required standard to achieve before bunch cycling on the road.

There are “No formal training programs to develop bunch riding skills...”
Monash University Accident Research Centre (2009)

Bunch cyclists form bunches which likely cannot stop safely,
cannot stop without rear-ending the cyclist in front,

and the fear of being rear-ended is then used
as a justification for cyclists proceeding through red traffic signals.

It ought not be.

I argue it is negligent for a cycling bunch to be a “No Stopping Zone”
as it affects the safety of all road users and bunch cyclists have a duty of care to each other

and other road users to keep a safe stopping distance behind the bicycle vehicle in front
and to form cycle bunches which can stop safely.

I argue that bunch cyclists also do not stop safely and proceed through red traffic signals because

there is no group responsibility.

I advocate that there be such a group responsibility in bunch cycling, 

and that all riders in the bunch be responsible for the bunch being able to stop safely.

I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local 

Infrastructure’s legislate such a collective responsibility, duty of care, to stop safely

on the part of riders participating in a cycling bunch.

Cycling Bunch size also affects stopping distance and the ability to stop safely,

partly by limiting the amount of incompetent riders.

The Code of Conduct for Training Cyclists recommends a maximum bunch size of 20 riders.

I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure’s


legislate a maximum bunch size of 20 riders to address difficulty stopping safely.



http://petedoweroadsafetyadvocate.blogspot.com.au/2013/04/cycling-bayside-council-pete-dowes.html




"There are certainly some operational issues in trying to stop cyclists because they are quite mobile and police are usually on foot or in a car," Supt Hartley said.

"You can't identify the cyclist because there are no registration details on them.

"Most offences a police officer sees wouldn't be stopped or fined because of the factors in trying to stop that cyclist."

The Sunday Telegraph  November 20, 2011





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