Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Cycling Beach Road Bunch Cycling Pedestrian Death Fatality 'Pedestrian's fault says Hell Rider' Herald Sun Negligence Road Rule 126 Difficulty Stopping Road Rule 151 Two Abreast Bunch Size Rec. Max. 20 Riders Cycling Participation Hell Ride Beach Road Weekend Morning No Stopping Zones Cycling & Walking Community Safety















https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWApp-huwe8


Bicycle Brake Reaction Time means the time a cyclist needs to -


• see a danger ahead;
• perceive what it means;
• decide on a response; and
• instigate that response,



when the bicycle continues to travel at is velocity.
A cyclist who is concentrating will have a Bicycle Brake Reaction Time of about 2½ seconds to react

to 'instigate a response' by squeezing his/her brake levers according to different, 

previously determined, pressure levels for the front and rear brakes when in an emergency situation.






Bicycle Brake Reaction Distance means the distance a bicycle travels, prior to applying the brakes, whilst a cyclist -

• sees a danger ahead;
• perceives what it means;
• decides on a response; and
• instigates that response by applying the brakes.

A cyclist who is concentrating will have a Brake Reaction Time of about 2½ seconds to apply his/her brake levers in an emergency situation.  By using the Bicycle Brake Stop Calculatorif the cyclist is travelling at 40 km p/h which equates to 11.11 metres p/s, the Bicycle Brake Response Distance would be 27.78m.



Give Way Mr Gould. 

Watch out for the Cyclists!




"Barrister Michael Sharpley, for Mr Raisin-Shaw, said Mr Gould had taken a risk when he tried to cross the road. 

"What, objectively, he did was walk into a wall of cyclists having underestimated their speed and size,'' Mr Sharpley told the court. 

Even though Mr Raisin-Shaw admitted hitting Mr Gould, he was not negligent, Mr Sharpley told coroner Graeme Johnstone. 

He said his client ignored the red light because he did not see Mr Gould and he feared he would cause an accident with the cyclists behind him if he stopped. "


http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/pedestrians-fault-says-hell-rider/story-e6frf7jo-1111113448144



Raisin-Shaw's decision proved to be wrong, 

but in the circumstances it "was not unreasonable", Mr Sharpley said.


Mr Sharpley accepted that his client had contributed to Mr Gould's death 

but argued his actions were "not indicative of any significant DEGREE of negligence".

"The alternative of proceeding through the red signal appeared to be the lesser of the two evils, 

on the basis that it was unlikely that a pedestrian would walk out in front of cyclists approaching at speed," he said.




http://www.theage.com.au/news/national/hell-ride-cyclist-under-pressure-from-pack/2007/05/01/1177788141416.html



the magistrate noted that Raisin-Shaw was only charged with disobeying the traffic signal.

The maximum penalty for the offence was a $550 fine, but Raisin-Shaw's lawyer, 

Michael Sharpley, asked the magistrate to take into ACCOUNT THEhttp://cdncache-a.akamaihd.net/items/it/img/arrow-10x10.png difficult group dynamics 

of the ride in determining the penalty.

"I'm now going to impose what everybody would consider a pathetic fine of $400," he said.






https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWApp-huwe8



I argue it is negligent for a cycling bunch to be a “No Stopping Zone”


as it affects the safety of all road users and bunch cyclists have a duty of care to each other

and other road users to keep a safe stopping distance behind the bicycle vehicle in front
and to form cycle bunches which can stop safely.



I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local 

Infrastructure’s legislate such a collective responsibility, duty of care, to stop safely

on the part of riders participating in a cycling bunch.



Pete Dowe
Road Safety Advocate





Apparently Mr Gould should've known the cycling bunch would behave negligently and illegally

and be unable to stop.


The 'silly fool' dared to step onto the pedestrian crossing with a "green man" walk sign.

How dare he!


Mr Gould was also an impediment to cycling by blocking Mr Raisin-Shaw's progress

through the pedestrian crossing while the traffic signals were red.




We must make it easier to take up riding through red lights.



Bunch cyclists who cannot stop safely may well have an excuse to not even bother

trying to stop under reforms being considered by Vic Roads.



After all red traffic signals must also be an impediment to cycling.



The poor unfortunate cyclist has to stop.



Cycling is obviously so much more important than walking,


and must be much more important than pedestrian lives too!





This blog strongly opposes certain reforms

VicRoads is currently considering:

“under one suggested reform, 


cyclists could be allowed to treat red lights as Give Way signs. 

And the same could also APPLY  at pedestrian lights."   
Also


"PERMITTING cyclists, riding cautiously, to proceed past a stationary tram;"


"ALLOWING all riders to use the footpath, provided that they give way to pedestrians."


Herald Sun 12.9.14


Pete Dowe

Road Safety Advocate





Pedestrian's fault says Hell Rider


A CYCLIST who ignored a red light and ploughed into an elderly pedestrian was not to blame for the man's death, a court has heard.
James Gould, 77, died at a pedestrian crossing on Beach Rd, Mentone on August 26 last year.

Mr Gould was hit by cyclist William Raisin-Shaw, 30, of St Kilda, as he tried to cross the road, the Coroners Court heard.

Mr Raisin-Shaw, who was among a pack of cyclists participating in the notorious Hell Ride from Black Rock to Mt Eliza, was running a red light when he hit Mr Gould.

Barrister Michael Sharpley, for Mr Raisin-Shaw, said Mr Gould had taken a risk when he tried to cross the road.

"What, objectively, he did was walk into a wall of cyclists having underestimated their speed and size,'' Mr Sharpley told the court.

Even though Mr Raisin-Shaw admitted hitting Mr Gould, he was not negligent, Mr Sharpley told coroner Graeme Johnstone.

He said his client ignored the red light because he did not see Mr Gould and he feared he would cause an accident with the cyclists behind him if he stopped.

"He knew there were riders bearing down on him from behind and he thought that no-one was crossing,'' Mr Sharpley told the court.

"He wasn't expecting a pedestrian to emerge into the pack.''

Mr Johnstone is expected to hand down his findings on July 25. 

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/pedestrians-fault-says-hell-rider/story-e6frf7jo-1111113448144




There are “No formal training programs to develop bunch riding skills...”


Monash University Accident Research Centre (2009)





  • Supervision is the key. Don’t let your child near the road unsupervised until you are sure they can stop safely and cross roads safely.




Bicycle Victoria's Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria (2002)









I argue that the “Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure



"has a duty of care to ensure that reasonable action is taken to minimise the risk of harm to anyone who is reasonably likely to be affected by the department's activities.”


I argue that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure

“may be found to be negligent where a failure to take reasonable care results in some injury or loss.”


I argue it is negligent for a cycling bunch to be a “No Stopping Zone”
as it affects the safety of all road users and bunch cyclists have a duty of care to each other

and other road users to keep a safe stopping distance behind the bicycle vehicle in front
and to form cycle bunches which can stop safely.



I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local 

Infrastructure’s legislate such a collective responsibility, duty of care, to stop safely

on the part of riders participating in a cycling bunch.



Cycling Bunch size also affects stopping distance and the ability to stop safely,

partly by limiting the amount of incompetent riders.

The Code of Conduct for Training Cyclists recommends a maximum bunch size of 20 riders.

I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure’s



legislate a maximum bunch size of 20 riders to address difficulty stopping safely.


The CycleSport Victoria and Amy Gillett Foundation submission to Coroner Johnstone’s inquest into the death of Pedestrian James Gould stated:

“The evidence establishes that there can be difficulties,
especially for inexperienced cyclists, in stopping safely 
when traffic lights are red, when they are riding in bunches.”

There is no required standard to achieve before bunch cycling on the road.


There are “No formal training programs to develop bunch riding skills...”


Monash University Accident Research Centre (2009)

Bunch cyclists form bunches which likely cannot stop safely,
cannot stop without rear-ending the cyclist in front,

and the fear of being rear-ended is then used
as a justification for cyclists proceeding through red traffic signals.

It ought not be.

I argue it is negligent for a cycling bunch to be a “No Stopping Zone”
as it affects the safety of all road users and bunch cyclists have a duty of care to each other

and other road users to keep a safe stopping distance behind the bicycle vehicle in front
and to form cycle bunches which can stop safely.

I argue that bunch cyclists also do not stop safely and proceed through red traffic signals because

there is no group responsibility.

I advocate that there be such a group responsibility in bunch cycling, 

and that all riders in the bunch be responsible for the bunch being able to stop safely.

I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local 

Infrastructure’s legislate such a collective responsibility, duty of care, to stop safely

on the part of riders participating in a cycling bunch.

Cycling Bunch size also affects stopping distance and the ability to stop safely,

partly by limiting the amount of incompetent riders.

The Code of Conduct for Training Cyclists recommends a maximum bunch size of 20 riders.

I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure’s



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