Monday, June 30, 2014

Motorists, Cyclists, Motorcyclists, Pedestrians Road Toll Deaths Fatalities Road to Zero Victoria Police wants no deaths on our roads Road Safety Community Safety Herald Sun June 27th 2014 & Victoria Police News July 1st 2014


"This is not a moralistic argument about whether people should or should not be taking drugs.
But there can be no argument about whether you should use drugs and then get in a car. You simply have to separate behaviours."

"Victoria Police wants no deaths on our roads — road to zero — and maybe we won’t get there but we’ll do everything in our power to aim for it."

Acting Superintendent

Martin Boorman

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/opinion/drugs-the-growing-threat-in-the-battle-on-our-roads/story-fni0ffsx-1226971313408?from=herald+sun_rss



"The “Road to Zero – it starts with you” campaign was launched on 31 March 2014 and urged the Victorian community to take ownership in reducing road trauma." 

http://www.vicpolicenews.com.au/news/3923-campaign-ends-but-road-to-zero-continues.html



Drugs the growing threat in the battle on our roads

WHEN we talk about drug driving, Victorians immediately think about people on the margins of society, drug dependent users and those who stand around dirty street corners with needles.
It might be the common view but that’s not necessarily who a drug driver is.
Our young people have normalised the behaviour of taking illicit drugs to socialise — regrettably, it’s just become common behaviour.
Yet if you spoke to their parents or friends, they would probably say that they’re weren’t a druggie.
There’s a whole mindset in society about drug use and behaviour and many people don’t associate drug use with causing a danger to others.
Many of the 2500 offenders we processed last year were first-time offenders and for a significant proportion of them it’s their first ever contact with the criminal justice system.
They are not people on the margins of society and they are not the sort of people you would put in that category of drug users. What they are is young people using a substance for a certain purpose, kids who don’t understand the consequences of their actions and quite clearly, the more they are doing that, the more we are coming across them.
This is not a moralistic argument about whether people should or should not be taking drugs.
But there can be no argument about whether you should use drugs and then get in a car. You simply have to separate behaviours.
It’s like drinking and driving. We all know that drinking and driving don’t go together and now we have to learn that drug use and driving do not go together.
We’ve done remarkably well with drink driving. We are seeing the number of people driving with a blood-alcohol level above .05 in fatal collisions going down and its been going down for some time.
That’s certainly something to be pleased about and as a result, our overall road trauma is going down as well.
But the use of illicit drugs — in particularly — the misuse and abuse of prescription drugs and other combinations is another subject altogether.
The misuse of drugs, for social activity, is becoming a real significant issue for our society. Drugs cause significant behavioural changes and when you connect that with driving a motor car, what you have is a recipe for disaster. Illicit drug use in driving and its contribution to road trauma is increasing. What’s more it’s increasing with no signs of diminishing.
Every little advance we make will lead to a better life for somebody or even keeping safe a future for someone.
No one is immune to the risk of road trauma. It can happen anytime, to anyone, and it arrives in the blink of an eye. All it takes is a second of inattentiveness and bang, the lights are out, you’re gone, it’s finished, nothing. That’s what death is.
I’ve been in the job a long time and it’s really rammed home, every time you go to a crash, what a bloody useless waste of life it is. Road death is so unnecessary.
I’m not diminishing the sacrifice of the armed forces who defend our country or what happened in 2009 with Black Saturday — those things are absolutely terrible. But are we to simply accept that that 240 people die on our roads every year? Are we that dismissive?
Victoria Police wants no deaths on our roads — road to zero — and maybe we won’t get there but we’ll do everything in our power to aim for it.
Martin Boorman is Acting Superintendent of the Road Policing Operations and Investigation Division of Road Policing Command
Originally published as Drugs and driving the new threat


http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/opinion/drugs-the-growing-threat-in-the-battle-on-our-roads/story-fni0ffsx-1226971313408?from=herald+sun_rss


http://www.parliament.vic.gov.au/images/stories/committees/rsc/motorcycle_safety/Transcripts/20111213_PDowe_Transcript.pdf




CAMPAIGN ENDS BUT ROAD TO ZERO CONTINUES

Victorians have shared their road safety messages and experiences with Victoria Police showing a keen interest in keeping our roads safe during the ‘Road to Zero – it starts with you’ campaign. 

An impressive 7.8 million people engaged with the social media campaign via #roadtozero. 

After a horror start to the year on the state’s roads, people have come together over the past three months via social media to share their stories, their heartache and their pain in a bid to encourage others to do the right thing on the road. 

The stories highlighted the hidden toll of those seriously injured in collisions and the impact road trauma has on those left behind. 

A mother told a story of two of her children killed and two other children seriously impacted by road trauma on Victorian roads. 

A policeman spoke about his daughter losing her life while texting and driving. 

A woman spoke of the pain of losing her vibrant, outgoing sister to an acquired brain injury after a crash. 

An AFL player said he knew first hand what happened to a family when someone was seriously injured on the roads. 

The community also shared their frustrations with driver behaviour, such as people using their mobile phones, not wearing seatbelts and speeding - issues that not just worry police but concern the community too. 

Throughout the campaign, police conducted large scale road policing operations around the state to target driver behaviours contributing to our road toll. 

More than 442,000 drivers were breath tested as part of operations Horizon, Arrow, Vestic, Amulet, Mountain Trail, Soteria and Crossroads, Manner, Austrans, Glendi and Regal. 

Eight hundred and twenty one drivers were caught drink driving. 

More than 4300 motorists were drug tested on the road with 287 drivers returning a positive preliminary oral fluid sample. 

A total of 39,026 offences were detected including – 

• 2160 using mobile phone 

• 1034 not wearing a seatbelt 

• 3034 exceeding speed limit by less than 10km/h 

• 9442 exceeding speed limit between 10 and 25kmh 

• 1325 exceeding speed limit by more than 25km/h 

• 3175 unregistered vehicles 

• 163 vehicles impounded 

• 1810 disobeying traffic control signs / signals 

Road Policing Command’s Assistant Commissioner Robert Hill acknowledged that while the campaign was coming to an end, the long term vision of zero fatalities and serious injuries was very much at the forefront of road policing and urged everyone to stay focused. 

“I’m pleased to see the community has got involved in the discussion with the Road to Zero campaign and are spreading the road safety message,” he said. 

“I want people to keep talking, and to keep sharing their stories about the impact road trauma has on everyone. 

“These stories are the hidden toll that will last so much longer than a three month campaign. 

“What the campaign has done is bring out the people behind the hidden toll, and put a face to the untold story. 

“There have been 126 lives lost on Victorian roads this year, that’s 126 families, friendship groups, sporting clubs, work places and schools who are grieving someone. 

“The discussion around the road to zero should never end,” he said. 

The “Road to Zero – it starts with you” campaign was launched on 31 March 2014 and urged the Victorian community to take ownership in reducing road trauma. 



Sergeant Anita Brens 

Victoria Police Media Unit 

33215

http://www.vicpolicenews.com.au/news/3923-campaign-ends-but-road-to-zero-continues.html


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