Friday, January 31, 2014

Motoring Death Fatality Culpable Driving Learner Drink Drive Speeding Puneet Puneet extradition back to Victoria to face justice.Herald Sun Dec.7th 2013

Puneet blamed sore eyes and a cat for the crash, rather than being drunk and driving at three times the speed limit.
"My eyes were sore and they were closed and when they opened a cat came on to the road and I lost control,'' Puneet said.


Because top cop Ken Lay made it clear to Puneet - and to all of Victoria - when he became chief commissioner in November 2011 that he had not forgotten about thelearner driver who had blown .165 and was alleged to be travelling at more than 150km/h at the time of the death crash.

In a wide-ranging interview with the Herald Sun upon his appointment to Victoria Police's top job, Mr Lay outlined his vision for the force under his stewardship, revealing his ambitious goals, including cutting domestic violence rates, decreasing street assaults and fixing the force's embattled IT system.
And bringing Puneet Puneet back to Victoria to face justice.

Mr Lay, the state's head traffic cop at the time Dean Hofstee was killed in the Southbank tragedy and his mate Clancy Coker was badly injured, was serious about culpable driving cases, putting them in the same bracket as homicides.

http://m.heraldsun.com.au/news/law-order/one-careless-moment-led-police-to-capture-hitrun-driver-puneet-puneet/story-fni0fee2-1226777874120

One careless moment led police to capture hit-run driver Puneet Puneet

Puneet Puneet the day after his car hit and killed Dean Hofstee and injured Clancy Coker. Picture: Rebecca Michael
Puneet Puneet the day after his car hit and killed Dean Hofstee and injured Clancy Coker. Picture: Rebecca Michael Source: News Limited
Puneet Puneet the day after his car hit and killed Dean Hofstee and injured Clancy Coker. Picture: Rebecca Michael

The car driven by Puneet Puneet in City Road, Southbank, in October 2008, after he hit and killed Dean Hofstee and injured Cl...

University student Dean Hofstee (left) who was hit and killed in Melbourne.
IN the end, fugitive driver Puneet Puneet helped Victoria Police, the Australian Federal Police and India's Punjab state force track him down.
He relaxed too much.
When Puneet fled to India in June 2009 while facing serious charges after he crashed his car in Southbank in October 2008 and killed 19-year-old student Dean Hofstee, he naturally relied on the help of family, who it is believed secretly kept him in safe houses.
But he soon got cocky, taking a job in a call centre. In 2010, Indian authorities came very close to arresting him, raiding his parents' home at one stage.
Rumours had him hiding in mountain regions and even crossing to neighbouring countries while the heat was on. Despite that narrow escape and his most-wanted status, it's understood he was even maintaining contact with friends in Australia.
Yet Puneet's days of evading justice were always numbered. If he was keeping up with his Googling, he would have realised that.
Because top cop Ken Lay made it clear to Puneet - and to all of Victoria - when he became chief commissioner in November 2011 that he had not forgotten about thelearner driver who had blown .165 and was alleged to be travelling at more than 150km/h at the time of the death crash.
In a wide-ranging interview with the Herald Sun upon his appointment to Victoria Police's top job, Mr Lay outlined his vision for the force under his stewardship, revealing his ambitious goals, including cutting domestic violence rates, decreasing street assaults and fixing the force's embattled IT system.
And bringing Puneet Puneet back to Victoria to face justice.
Mr Lay, the state's head traffic cop at the time Dean Hofstee was killed in the Southbank tragedy and his mate Clancy Coker was badly injured, was serious about culpable driving cases,
The car driven by Puneet Puneet in City Road, Southbank, in October 2008, after he hit and killed Dean Hofstee and injured Cl...
The car driven by Puneet Puneet in City Road, Southbank, in October 2008, after he hit and killed Dean Hofstee and injured Clancy Coker. Picture: Morganna Magee
putting them in the same bracket as homicides.
As chief commissioner, he was frustrated that Puneet was able to leave Australia on a friend's passport while on bail and elude justice for almost five years. At the time, Australia had no extradition treaty with India, but this would change.
Mr Lay turned up the heat in August 2012, with the force announcing a $100,000 reward for information leading to Puneet's capture - unprecedented for a traffic matter and a fortune in India. It started the "chatter" and renewed hope of a lead.
Despite this, Puneet was more confident than ever that he had eluded justice. This year he was again working in a call centre, as a telemarketing agent, and even planning his wedding to a local girl.
But he made a hopelessly careless decision to meet his father in a hotel in a small town near the southern Punjab city of Rajpura. He was betrayed by a friend, who no doubt had one eagle eye on that tip-off fortune, and a week ago police swooped.
Police say the full story about Puneet's capture is "interesting'' , but that will only be fully revealed when he returns to face court.
He is fighting extradition from Patiala Prison, believing his fate will be "miserable" if he is extradited to Australia.
Although Victoria Police will say little about their involvement, it is believed major collision unit investigators shared information with the AFP and their counterparts in India, leading to them pinpointing his location.
In 2009, Puneet had pleaded guilty to culpable driving charges arising from the fatal smash on October 1, 2008. But within days he had obtained a friend's passport, packed his bags, and hoodwinked airport officials.
University student Dean Hofstee (left) who was hit and killed in Melbourne.
University student Dean Hofstee (left) who was hit and killed in Melbourne.
He left behind a trail of destruction, grief and consequences. His friend, Sukhcharanjit Singhh, was jailed for a maximum of 30 months for giving Puneet his passport.
But the killer driver's decision to only look out for himself was not surprising. It was clear when a Herald Sun reporter interviewed Puneet, then 19, hours after the crash that he was unaware of, or unconcerned by, the consequences of his actions that ended the life of a young visitor from the Gold Coast and severely affected the life of the other.
Puneet blamed sore eyes and a cat for the crash, rather than being drunk and driving at three times the speed limit.
"My eyes were sore and they were closed and when they opened a cat came on to the road and I lost control,'' Puneet said.

http://m.heraldsun.com.au/news/law-order/one-careless-moment-led-police-to-capture-hitrun-driver-puneet-puneet/story-fni0fee2-1226777874120

http://petedoweroadsafetyadvocate.blogspot.com.au/2014/01/motoring-death-fatality-culpable_31.html

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