Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Cycling Beach Road Bunch Cycling Tailgate Cam Laser Road Rule 126 Difficulty Stopping Slipstreaming No Stopping Zones

Thus the Victorian government plans to start trialling new technology - such as special hand-held cameras - which is designed to identify and measure tailgating offences.

"Victoria will be looking at the technology available and assessing what will work best here. This will enable better enforcement of the law and put drivers on notice that they must keep a safe distance from the vehicle in front," said (Victorian Minister for Roads) Mr Mulder.


“Most rules in the Road Rules apply to bicycle riders in the same way

as they apply to drivers—

There are some other rules that are for bicycle riders only,

or that have exceptions for bicycle riders.”


Road Rules Victoria 1999

Victorian Government Gazette


Road Rule 126. Keeping a safe distance behind vehicles



A driver must drive a sufficient distance behind a vehicle 
travelling in front of the driver so the driver can, 

if necessary, stop safely to avoid a collision with 

the vehicle.



“The evidence establishes that there can be difficulties,

especially for inexperienced cyclists, in stopping safely 

when traffic lights are red, when they are riding in bunches.”


CycleSport Victoria and Amy Gillett Foundation submission to Coroner Johnstone’s inquest into the death of James Gould.

http://www.theage.com.au/news/national/rider-ran-red-light-fearing-collision/2007/03/29/1174761667477.html



James Holgate, VicRoads' director of vehicle and road-use policy, said VicRoads, the TAC, Victoria Police and the Department of Justice would now work together to create the tailgating legislation.
Mr Holgate said there were emerging anti-tailgating technologies in the US, but no data yet on how effective they were.
"I think people know the current law is subjective and they can get away with being too close. Putting some certainty around the technology will improve that," Mr Holgate said.
"We don't know the details of the law yet. We will develop that after we've understood the limitations of the technology."

Lasers, video tech may track tailgaters

New tailgating laws for Victorian motorists

Minister for Roads, Terry Mulder announces plans to bring in laws and technology that will fine tailgating motorists in Victoria.
Tailgating motorists will be hit with heavier penalties under new laws to be introduced by the Victorian government.
Rear-end crashes are the second most common form of road accident, VicRoads data shows, but even so, no clear tailgating offence exists in Victoria's road rules.
Police are only able to charge people with “failing to keep a sufficient distance from the vehicle in front”, which carries a penalty of one demerit point and a $211 fine for cars and a $282 fine for heavy vehicles.
Roads Minister Terry Mulder said the government would investigate laser and video technology that is emerging in the US in a bid to police tailgating more effectively.
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However, Mr Mulder had no word on when the tougher laws would be introduced or how they would be policed. Nor was there any funding for the new legislation or technology, he said.
"Number one – today's announcement is that we are going to address the issue of tailgating," Mr Mulder said.
"Number two; we're going to bring in legislation to support it; number three, we're going to be looking at the technology that's currently being used overseas for successful prosecutions to bring that technology to Victoria. It's pretty hard to make a budget commitment to a project when we don't have the full costings in front of us."
The state opposition's roads spokesman, Luke Donnellan, said the announcement was "spin and window dressing ... to ensure the bad news stories about this government are covered up".
"This is related to today's news of the blowout in hospital waiting lists which was totally related to state government actions. This is not a serious approach to road safety," Mr Donnellan said.
Between 2007 and 2011 there were 61 deaths and 3457 serious injuries from rear-end crashes, VicRoads data shows.
James Holgate, VicRoads' director of vehicle and road-use policy, said VicRoads, the TAC, Victoria Police and the Department of Justice would now work together to create the tailgating legislation.
Mr Holgate said there were emerging anti-tailgating technologies in the US, but no data yet on how effective they were.
"I think people know the current law is subjective and they can get away with being too close. Putting some certainty around the technology will improve that," Mr Holgate said.
"We don't know the details of the law yet. We will develop that after we've understood the limitations of the technology."
http://theage.drive.com.au/motor-news/lasers-video-tech-may-track-tailgaters-20130226-2f37c.html


http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/law-order/victoria-police-boost-anti-speeding-arsenal-with-new-handheld-laser-devices/story-fni0fee2-1226691696070

http://theage.drive.com.au/motor-news/lasers-video-tech-may-track-tailgaters-20130226-2f37c.html


The current penalty for tailgating is a fine of between $211 (for cars) and $282 (for heavy vehicles), as well as the loss of one demerit point.

However minister for roads Terry Mulder says that this law has been ineffective in reducing the amount of people who are failing to keep a safe following distance.

"In the recent Victorian Road Safety Survey, 56 per cent of drivers said they frequently experienced tailgating and other intimidating behaviour - so clearly the message is not getting through," said Mr Mulder in a statement released February 26.

Thus the Victorian government plans to start trialling new technology - such as special hand-held cameras - which is designed to identify and measure tailgating offences.

"Victoria will be looking at the technology available and assessing what will work best here. This will enable better enforcement of the law and put drivers on notice that they must keep a safe distance from the vehicle in front," said Mr Mulder.

http://www.smartfleetaustralia.com.au/news/victorian-government-clamp-down-tailgaters

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