Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Parole Gruesome 'Murderess' SA Court told convicted killer Donna Casagrande should not have been released after manslaughter term The Advertiser Adelaide Now Nov. 21st 2013 Female Aggression Violence by Women Murder Death Fatality Gender Equality Appropriate Attitudes towards Men Community Safety


In 2003, Casagrande and her then-lover, Nicole Therese Coucier McGuinness, were jailed over the death of John "Joanne" Lillecrapp - a transvestite, truck driver and professional wrestler.

McGuinness pleaded guilty to murder, and Casagrande to manslaughter, after they killed Ms Lillecrapp, beheaded him and dismembered his corpse in 2001.

The remains of Ms Lillecrapp were buried in his strawberry patch and dumped at locations around Adelaide.


In sentencing, the late Justice John Perry said the killing and "gruesome dismemberment" showed the "cold-blooded callousness" of the former prostitutes, who had befriended Ms Lillecrapp.

George Mancini, for Casagrande, today questioned the wisdom of the Parole Board's decision to release his client from jail as soon as her manslaughter non-parole period expired.

He told the court that the board's reasoning may have been flawed, creating the very vulnerabilities that caused his client to reoffend.

"We want the Parole Board to give us (access to) the materials that enabled them to release her and say she was good for rehabilitation," he said.

"A subsequent Parole Board report, provided at sentencing (for the crime spree), says she has 'inadequate coping capacity and was clearly not ready for release'.



SA court told convicted killer Donna Casagrande should not have been released after manslaughter term

Donna Lee Casagrande is led into the Adelaide Magistrates Court in September, 2001, over the murder of John Lillecrapp at Angle
Donna Lee Casagrande is led into the Adelaide Magistrates Court in September, 2001, over the murder of John Lillecrapp at Angle Park. Picture: Michael Milnes Source: The Advertiser
A FORMER prostitute who went on a crime spree after finishing a jail term for dismembering a transvestite was "clearly not ready" for release, a court has heard.
Convicted killer Donna Lee Casagrande today challenged her six-year sentence, for theft and trespassing offences, in the Supreme Court.
In 2003, Casagrande and her then-lover, Nicole Therese Coucier McGuinness, were jailed over the death of John "Joanne" Lillecrapp - a transvestite, truck driver and professional wrestler.
McGuinness pleaded guilty to murder, and Casagrande to manslaughter, after they killed Ms Lillecrapp, beheaded him and dismembered his corpse in 2001.
The remains of Ms Lillecrapp were buried in his strawberry patch and dumped at locations around Adelaide.
In sentencing, the late Justice John Perry said the killing and "gruesome dismemberment" showed the "cold-blooded callousness" of the former prostitutes, who had befriended Ms Lillecrapp.
He said Casagrande and McGuinness both came from broken homes and had long histories of offending, drug abuse and violence.
But he said the duo, who cried throughout the sentencing, were genuinely remorseful for their actions.
Casagrande received a 12-year sentence with a 10-year minimum term, while McGuinness was jailed for life with an 18-year non-parole period.
In November 2011, Casagrande was released on parole but, in February 2012, faced court again over offences committed following her release from prison.
She was accused of aggravated serious criminal trespass, dishonestly taking property, and attempted deception.
Casagrande pleaded guilty to having committed the offences at Davoren Park and Prospect between January 5 and 8, 2012.
Magistrate Derek Sprod jailed Casagrande for three years and four months.
However, he ordered that penalty begin after the expiration of her manslaughter term, creating an effective sentence of six years, five months and 22 days.
Casagrande subsequently challenged her sentence in the Supreme Court.
George Mancini, for Casagrande, today questioned the wisdom of the Parole Board's decision to release his client from jail as soon as her manslaughter non-parole period expired.
He told the court that the board's reasoning may have been flawed, creating the very vulnerabilities that caused his client to reoffend.
"We want the Parole Board to give us (access to) the materials that enabled them to release her and say she was good for rehabilitation," he said.
"A subsequent Parole Board report, provided at sentencing (for the crime spree), says she has 'inadequate coping capacity and was clearly not ready for release'.
"What the Parole Board said in allowing her to be released should have been before the Magistrate when she was sentenced."
Mr Mancini said the insight into the Parole Board's decisions about his client were vital to her appeal.
He said his client was at risk of serving "double punishment", and asked the court to issue subpoenas to the board.
Prosecutors opposed the application, saying Mr Sprod had considered all relevant materials when handing down his sentence.
Justice Michael David told the hearing that Casagrande was serving "a substantial term of imprisonment".
"I'm not saying it's not deserved, but I will give her every opportunity to investigate these issues," he said.
He adjourned the matter until next month to hear submissions on whether a subpoena should be issued.
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http://m.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/sa-court-told-convicted-killer-donna-casagrande-should-not-have-been-released-after-manslaughter-term/story-fni6uo1m-1226765128362


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