Sunday, October 6, 2013

Cycling BicycleNetworkVictoria BUPA Around the Bay in a Day Ride2Work BeachRoadCyclingNoStoppingZones


"Our review of cycling deaths shows that cyclists who break the law are much more likely to be killed or seriously injured". Bicycle Victoria (2002)

"In over 60 per cent of (fatal) crashes, the cyclist was deemed to be ‘responsible’ for the
action that precipitated the fatal crash.” ATSB 2006



The erroneous common assumption that all cyclist deaths and serious injury are caused by motorist wrongdoing feeds a cyclist victim mentality.

Rather cyclists are victims of ‘cycling participation’ so called ’behaviour change’ promotion.

Pete Dowe

Road Safety Advocate


"Please note that your entry fee goes to support Bicycle Network in improving road conditions for all riders.

To help children in need, The Smith Family needs you to fundraise in addition to the physical challenge you have on
Sunday 20 October 2013. Click here to login to your personalised fundraising page for Bupa Around the Bay and start supporting the kids!"


If Bicycle Victoria/ Bicycle Network Victoria/ Bicycle Network really aims to improve road conditions for all cyclists 

then they should stop promoting cycling in such a way that bicycle riders
are resented 
and much more likely to be killed and seriously injured!


Pete Dowe
Road Safety Advocate

October 7th 2013

"We would not have the cyclists behaviour problem on Beach Road or elsewhere in Victoria, 

if the emphasis on cycling promotion was on being law abiding, 

on having responsibilities, 

rather than 'participation' in road usage being the goal 

and the law being seen as optional."

Pete Dowe
Road Safety Advocate



“Education starts in the road user’s head”

I agree. You must be fit to ride, before you ride for health and fitness

But Victoria Police advise in relation to traffic infringements that education does not work without enforcement.

Yet the Cycling community believe in education alone. 

That rogue cyclists will somehow self-regulate.

This has this never worked.

Behaviour Change (what a misnomer), ‘cycling participation’ programs such as Around the Bay in a Day and Ride2Work create inexperienced, careless and reckless rogue cycling.

Behaviour Change actually means simply ‘changing’ from one mode of transport to another i.e. stepping out of a car straight on to a bicycle and ‘participating’ in cycling.

Participation in cyclist road usage is not a worthwhile goal and ‘sets the bar too low’

Behaviour modification is best addressed off-road, before people take up cycling.

We would not have the cyclists behaviour problem on Beach Road or elsewhere in Victoria, 

if the emphasis on cycling promotion was on being law abiding, 

on having responsibilities, 

rather than 'participation' in road usage being the goal 

and the law being seen as optional.


"The fact so many new riders were taking to the roads meant there were a big group of "newbie" cyclists who had yet to learn the best way to conduct themselves on the roads

Also, some "outlier" cyclists were "doing stupid things" and creating risks by using apps to record competing times on some segments of busy commuter bike paths.

A caller who claimed to have clocked cyclists at 35km/h on some stretches of Gardiner's Creek path was probably correct, he said.


In fact, Mr Brennan said he had clocked riders doing 40km/h on a stretch between Toorak Road and Waverley.

Bicycle Network Victoria's Gary Brennan 

Herald Sun 
February 13th 2013




To reiterate, Victoria Police advise in relation to traffic infringements that education does not work without enforcement.

Rooman also states: “the roads are for everyone who can accept the responsibility of being a road user.”
And what about those who don’t?

One road user group, the current Victorian Cycling community, has continually opposed law enforcement of cyclists, and law enforcement capability/ cyclists’ identification, 

as a disincentive to unsafe, illegitimate cycling.

So it should be!

Even with littering the www.litter.vic.gov.au website states: “Enforcement and education play a primary role in improving these behaviours.”


Is reckless cycling less of a problem for the community than littering?

Is reckless cycling unworthy of law enforcement and education?

While at the same time the current Victorian Cycling community has called for increased penalties and enforcement upon every other road user group.

The issue is the people and the bicycle vehicle.

Opposing law enforcement, and law enforcement capability for cyclists, brings resentment and illegitimacy upon cyclists as a whole.

Furthermore it is a no brainer.

“Cyclists who want motorists to share the road have got to do the same themselves.
It really annoys us to see cyclists breaking the law as they are endangering themselves and others but also giving cyclists a bad name...”
Bicycle Victoria as previously stated on its website

Law enforcement is a cycling safety measure.
The fact is law-breaking cyclists mainly hurt themselves.

"Our review of cycling deaths shows that cyclists who break the law are much more likely to be killed or seriously injured". Bicycle Victoria (2002)



"In over 60 per cent of (fatal) crashes, the cyclist was deemed to be ‘responsible’ for the

The erroneous common assumption that all cyclist deaths and serious injury are caused by motorist wrongdoing feeds a cyclist victim mentality.

Rather cyclists are victims of ‘cycling participation’/’behaviour change’ promotion.

Bicycle Victoria claims (based on a Danish mortality study*) that:
“The health benefits of cycling such as a more active lifestyle and better fitness far outweigh the risks of death or injury from crashes.” Bicycle Victoria’s Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria (2002)

Bicycle Victoria’s ‘behaviour change’ ‘cycling participation’ advocacy, assumes a cavalier attitude to risk of death or injury.

I also believe this kind of “she’ll be right” cycling promotion is not only misleading but irresponsible by denying people an informed choice as to the risks and risk reduction

and therefore could have public and civil liability issues as well.

Pete Dowe

Road Safety Advocate


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