Friday, May 3, 2013

Trams Cyclists Motorists & Pedestrians Photo Tram Doors Open Stop Sign



Trams

Rule: A bike rider (or motorist) must stop before passing the rear
of a stopped tram at a tram stop. 

Once the tram doors are closed and pedestrians 
have crossed between the tram and kerb, 
the rider (or motorist) may then proceed to pass the tram.



http://petedoweroadsafetyadvocate.blogspot.com.au/2012/08/cycling-road-rules-tram-stop-footpath.html

http://petedoweroadsafetyadvocate.blogspot.com.au/2012/08/hit-and-run-cyclist-tram-stop-creep.html

http://petedoweroadsafetyadvocate.blogspot.com.au/2012/08/cyclist-creep-strikes-elderly-woman.html

Hazardous passage

It is no surprise to read that Swanston Street between Flinders and Collins streets is one of Melbourne's bicycle danger hot-spots (''Cyclists get warning on danger spots'', 22/5). Incredibly, one of the main hazards on that strip is the police vehicles, including wide response vans, parked outside St Paul's Cathedral. The result for cyclists is a dangerously narrow gap to navigate between police vehicles and passing trams. It makes a sick joke of efforts to promote Swanston Street as a safe place for cycling.
While the intentions behind dedicated bike lanes on Swanston Street are sincere, in practice it's the wrong street. Bikes tangling with trams and their passengers doesn't work. It's a painfully slow ride in peak hour; you might as well just get off and walk. By contrast, the new Copenhagen-style bike lanes on La Trobe Street are brilliant, and seem to have been embraced by pedallers. The concept needs to be replicated on suitable north-south routes such as Queen Street and Russell Street.
Tom Ormonde, Fitzroy North

The Age

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