Saturday, April 20, 2013

Cycling ID & Law Enforcement A Cycle Of Law Breaking Sunday Telegraph


NSW Police traffic services head Superintendent John Hartley said police ignore most cycling offences they witness because of the difficulty in apprehending or identifying the bike rider.
"There are certainly some operational issues in trying to stop cyclists because they are quite mobile and police are usually on foot or in a car," Supt Hartley said.


"You can't identify the cyclist because there are no registration details on them.
"Most offences a police officer sees wouldn't be stopped or fined because of the factors in trying to stop that cyclist."
http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/a-cycle-of-law-breaking-across-nsw/story-e6freuy9-1226199915695

A cycle of law-breaking across NSW


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bikes
Risky: One rider stops but the other blatantly flouts the road rules. Picture: Angelo Soulas Source: The Daily Telegraph
ONLY 38 cyclists across NSW were fined for running a red light in the past year, with police admitting rebel riders are simply too hard to catch.
But this week The Sunday Telegraph watched as 14 out of 16 cyclists speed through a red light in under an hour at the intersection of Oxford St and Glenmore Rd in Paddington.
In this time, three cyclists illegally rode on the footpath.
While motorists who speed or run a red light face being caught by camera, prosecuted and having demerit points stripped from their license, police are almost powerless to prosecute cyclists flouting road rules due to a lack of identification.
NSW Police traffic services head Superintendent John Hartley said police ignore most cycling offences they witness because of the difficulty in apprehending or identifying the bike rider.
"There are certainly some operational issues in trying to stop cyclists because they are quite mobile and police are usually on foot or in a car," Supt Hartley said.
"You can't identify the cyclist because there are no registration details on them.
"Most offences a police officer sees wouldn't be stopped or fined because of the factors in trying to stop that cyclist."
According to the Office of State Revenue, police issued only 38 infringement notices for proceeding through a red traffic light in the past financial year. The fine is $59 or a maximum court imposed penalty of $2200.
Another 6533 fines were issued to riders not wearing helmets and 742 for riding on a footpath. The fines for both offences are only $59 each.
On Thursday morning The Sunday Telegraph visited a notorious intersection on Oxford St, Paddington where cyclists routinely run the red light in the city-bound bus lane.
Between 7.30am and 8.30am we recorded 14 cyclists ignore the red light and weave around pedestrians as they attempted to cross the road.
In doing so, drivers turning right from Glenmore Rd were forced to wait until it was safe to make their turn. Only two cyclists stopped.
A spokesperson for the Minister for Roads and Ports would not comment on whether cyclists should face the same tough penalties as drivers, but did concede there is an issue with law-breaking cyclists.
"There are a number of cyclist road warriors out there who are just as bad as intolerant car drivers," the spokesperson said.


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