Thursday, March 21, 2013

Cycling Ride2School Death Fatality Child not ready for the Road Bicycle's Victoria Report into Cycle Deaths 2002 “Cyclists are much more likely to Die from Bicycle Alone Accidents/ Bike Falls and Riding on the Footpath onto the Road or Crossing than Dooring” Pete Dowe Cycling Safety Cycling Safely Cycling Deaths Fatalities Risk Reduction Informed Choice Victoria's Cycling Strategy Focus on Increasing/ Encouraging Cycling Participation may be Negligent“Cyclists who break the Law are much more likely to be killed or seriously injured” Bicycle Network Victoria "Young people are being killed riding off the footpath onto the road" Bicycle Network Victoria


Bicycle Victoria's Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria 2002


Lessons – Too many children die because they cannot control their bikes and are not “traffic” aware:

How cyclists die – some case studies


Case 2 – Child not ready for the road

Circumstances - Emily had just got her new bike for Christmas. Mum and Dad had shown her how to ride but had not been riding with her. 
She was testing the new bike at her parents place in the country and decided to ride to the road and back. Emily rode out the front gate into the path of an oncoming utility travelling at 80km/h. She died immediately of multiple injuries.

Lessons – Too many children die because they cannot control their bikes and are not “traffic” aware:

  • Supervision is the key. Don’t let your child near the road unsupervised until you are sure they can stop safely and cross roads safely. Adequate supervision or a child-proof front gate could have prevented Emily’s death.
  • Education. Traffic awareness courses are available to young children can learn the rules of the road in a safe environment. This should be backed up by supervised rides with adults. Road safety is like pool safety
  • Care at crossings. If riding on the footpath or shared path care must be taken crossing intersecting roads. Councils can make sure off-road shared paths have clear, safe crossing points at roads, these should be signalised or grade separated (underpass for the path) for busier roads.
  • Safe routes to school. Safe  off-road paths allow children and novice cyclists to learn cycling skills in a traffic free environment.


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