Friday, March 1, 2013

Cycling Death Fatality No Helmet No Lights Ran Red Light Melbourne The Age 2012


‘‘Helmets save lives. Lights save lives. 
Sometimes you’re just lost for words as to why we don’t get that,’’ 

Sergeant Hickson said.

http://m.theage.com.au/victoria/cyclist-killed-in-highway-car-collision-20120210-1s73p.html

https://www.bicyclenetwork.com.au/media/vanilla/file/2002_Deaths_report.pdf

Bike Lights Law
Road Rule 259

"The rider of a bicycle must not ride at night, or in hazardous weather conditions causing reduced visibility..."

http://petedoweroadsafetyadvocate.blogspot.com.au/2012/09/bike-lights-law-road-rule-259.html

Bicycle Victoria spokesman Garry Brennan said 

it was critically important for cyclists to stop at red lights...

"Now that the days are getting shorter, 

riders need to be more conscious of the need for lights 

on their bikes on early morning rides,’’ said Mr Brennan. 

Feb 10th 2012
http://m.theage.com.au/victoria/cyclist-killed-in-highway-car-collision-20120210-1s73p.html

http://petedoweroadsafetyadvocate.blogspot.com.au/2013/02/cycling-bike-lights-public-liability.html

"Cyclists who break the law are much more 

likely to be killed and seriously injured"

Bicycle Victoria's Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria (2002)

Cyclist killed in highway car collision

Megan Levy February 10, 2012
A cyclist killed on an early morning ride in Melbourne’s outer north-west appeared to have entered a major intersection on a red light before she was struck by a car, police say.
The 36-year-old mother was not wearing a helmet and suffered massive head injuries in the accident at the intersection of Gourlay Road and the Melton Highway at Hillside.
Sergeant Kevin Hickson the woman, who was dressed in cycling lycra, was believed to have had earphones in and did not have lights on her bike when the crash occurred at 6.15am.
He said the woman was cycling north on Gourlay Road when she entered the intersection with the Melton Highway and was struck by a maroon Nissan coupe, driven by a 23-year-old from Hillside, heading east on the highway.
Sergeant Hickson said witnesses saw the Nissan pass through the intersection when the light turned amber and struck the woman, who was already in the middle of the intersection.
‘‘From our witnesses and the driver and the light cycle, it would appear that the cyclist has maybe entered the intersection against the red light or for some reason moved into the intersection maybe from the centre median strip before she should have,’’ Sergeant Hickson said.
He said another vehicle that had been travelling near the Nissan had stopped at the lights when they turned amber.
‘‘From the witnesses and from what we’ve been told by the driver, the lights turned amber and one the drivers has stopped, one of the drivers has gone through,’’ he said.
‘‘We don’t believe there’s any speed involved, there’s no suggestion of alcohol. 
What we have found out so far is that the cyclist wasn’t wearing a helmet, there’s no lights on the bike, 

we think maybe she might have had a set of headphones in - there’s a set of headphones with her - and at this stage we’re just trying to clarify why she was in the intersection when the drivers had a green light for them and then an amber light.’’
He said it was a ‘‘sad day’’ for the woman’s family, including her young child.
‘‘A family has lost a daughter and a child has lost a mum,’’ he said.
However he said cyclists needed to take precautions to ensure their safety on the road.
‘‘Helmets save lives. Lights save lives. Sometimes you’re just lost for words as to why we don’t get that,’’ Sergeant Hickson said.
‘‘Some cyclists think that because they’re watching, they’re going to see everything and that’s not the case.’’
Bicycle Victoria spokesman Garry Brennan said it was critically important for cyclists to stop at red lights,

and for motorists not to approach intersections with the assumption that lights would turn in their favour ‘‘because riders can get stranded in wide intersections such as this one’’.
"Now that the days are getting shorter, riders need to be more conscious of the need for lights on their bikes on early morning rides,’’ he said.
"Melbourne probably has the highest rate of helmet wearing in the world, and it is troubling that way too many of the bike fatalities involve riders without helmets.’’
However he said the suggestion that the woman was wearing headphones was not an issue.
‘‘Just as car radios and motorcycle in-helmet speakers have not been shown to be a problem, no evidence has emerged that headphones on bike riders are hazardous,’’ he said.
Less than two hours after the Hillside crash, paramedics were called to a separate crash involving a car and a cyclist in Beaumaris.
  Ambulance Victoria spokesman Paul Bentley said the collision occurred at the corner of Cloris Avenue and Tramway Parade at 7.40am.
The cyclist was taken to Sandringham Hospital in a stable condition, however further details of the crash were not immediately available.
Mr Bentley said paramedics were called to three other accidents this morning involving cyclists falling from their bikes.
A 28-year-old man was taken to the Royal Melbourne Hospital in a stable condition after he crashed on Poplar Road in Parkville at 8.40am.
Forty minutes later, paramedics were called to Chapman Street in Rosanna where a 55-year-old man had come off his bike. He was taken to hospital in a stable condition.
At 10am a 25-year-old man fell from his bike near the intersection of Through Road and Joffre Street in Camberwell. He was taken to The Alfred hospital in a stable condition.
The woman’s death at Hillside brings Victoria’s road toll for the year to 35, compared to 25 for the same period last year.
Police are appealing for anyone who saw the Hillside crash to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or visit www.crimestoppers.com.au.

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