Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Police suggest law to switch off motorists' mobiles H Sun Editorial


Police suggest law that forces drivers to turn off their mobiles when behind the wheel


Mobile phone
POLICE HAVE SUGGESTED NEW LAWS FORCING DRIVERS TO TURN OFF THEIR PHONES WHILE BEHIND THE WHEEL. PICTURE: ANDREW HENSHAW HERALD SUN
IF your mobile phone rings while you are driving your car, you are likely to answer it. Turning it off when you get behind the wheel removes the temptation and police believe a change in the law will drive home the message.
It's only a suggestion at this stage and while Victoria's top highway patrol cop admits it will be opposed by some drivers, it could save their lives.
Inspector David Griffin says police would prefer there were no phones in cars.
An average of 150 drivers a day are booked for using their mobile phones while driving. Drivers paid more than $15 million in mobile phone fines last year and even more alarming is that the worst offenders were driving mums caught talking on their phones in 40km/h school zones.
Making it an offence to have your mobile turned on would, Insp Griffin believes, help to discourage drivers from using them.
If a driver is pulled up for a random breath test, they could be asked if they have a mobile phone and police could could ask to see that it was turned off.
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Insp Griffin says he believes it's time for a debate on whether it should be illegal to have your mobile switched on in the car.
The Herald Sun supports anything that tackles the road toll, so welcomes Insp Griffin's call for a public debate.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/opinion/police-want-law-to-force-drivers-to-turn-off-their-mobiles-when-behind-the-wheel/story-e6frfhqo-1226510163305

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