Thursday, July 26, 2012

Deaths of Cyclists due to Road Crashes Australian Transport Safety Bureau ATSB Cycling Deaths Fatalities “Cyclists are much more likely to Die from Bicycle Alone Accidents/ Bike Falls and Riding on the Footpath onto the Road or Crossing than Dooring” Cycling Safety Cycling Safely Cycling Deaths Fatalities Risk Reduction Informed Choice Victoria's Cycling Strategy Focus on Increasing/ Encouraging Cycling Participation may be Negligent Reliable Photo Identification

Deaths of Cyclists due to Road Crashes ATSB


"In over 60 per cent of (fatal) crashes, the cyclist was deemed to be ‘responsible’ for the
action that precipitated the fatal crash. This was particularly the case in crashes
at intersections where the cyclist was either riding through the intersection on
the road or moving from the footway onto the intersection. Cyclists were also
found to be primarily responsible in other crashes where the cyclist moved from
the footway to the road." ATSB 2006


ATSB ROAD SAFETY REPORT
July 2006 

Deaths of cyclists due to road crashes 
Main findings

• From 1996 to 2000, nearly one-third of all male cyclists and nearly half of male
cyclists in the 10 to 19 age group killed in road crashes were not wearing a
helmet. Similarly, nearly one-third of all female cyclists killed in road crashes in
the period were not wearing a helmet. For 2001 to 2004, helmet usage in over
half the cases was unknown, but in the 48 cases where it was known, 30 of the
cyclists were wearing a helmet and 18 were not.

• The most frequently assigned major factor in fatal road crashes involving
cyclists in the period 1996 to 2004 was the failure of cyclists and other road
users to observe each other on the road. For cyclists, their visibility remains a
key safety issue.

• The most common type of crash in which cyclists were fatally injured was the
cyclist being hit from behind by a motor vehicle travelling in the same lane in
the same direction. Cyclists riding on rural roads are particularly at risk of being
run over from behind. From 1996 to 2004, there were at least 58 cases where a
cyclist was run over by a motor vehicle coming from behind. This kind of crash
occurred in urban as well as in rural areas but 38 cases occurred on rural roads,
most during the day.

• The next most common crash type was the cyclist riding from the footway into
an intersection or onto a road and being hit by an oncoming motor vehicle.

Other findings

• In over 60 per cent of crashes, the cyclist was deemed to be ‘responsible’ for the
action that precipitated the fatal crash. This was particularly the case in crashes
at intersections where the cyclist was either riding through the intersection on
the road or moving from the footway onto the intersection. Cyclists were also
found to be primarily responsible in other crashes where the cyclist moved from
the footway to the road.

• In one-third of crashes (75), either the cyclist or the driver of the motor vehicle
failed to observe the other. In another 21 crashes, some kind of misjudgement by
the cyclist or the driver of the motor vehicle was considered to be the major
factor in the crash. In another 14 crashes, the cyclist ‘failed to observe road
traffic signal or sign’ and in another 13 crashes the bicycle had a ‘critical
malfunction or defect’.

• In the 46 crashes where the cyclist was run over from behind, 10 of the motor
vehicle drivers failed to observe the cyclist, 5 drivers were under the influence
of alcohol or drugs and the vision of 5 drivers was obscured for some reason,
e.g. glare. For the other crashes, the reasons were many and varied or unknown.

• Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was unknown for 93 of the 222 cyclists
killed but in nearly 90 per cent of the cases where it was known, BAC was found
to be zero. Only 15 of the 222 cyclists were tested for drugs and the results for
14 of these were positive – this is likely to reflect the circumstances of the 15,
rather than the drugs prevalence among the 222. 

• Of the 202 motor vehicle drivers involved in crashes in which a cyclist was
killed, 130 were tested for alcohol and in most cases (119) BAC was found to be
zero. Most were not tested for drugs but a few tested positive.

• In 86 per cent of crashes, the weather was fine. About two-thirds of the crashes
occurred mid-block and one-third within an intersection. Fifteen crashes (7 per
cent) occurred on a national highway, 90 crashes (41 per cent) on some other
highway or arterial road and 112 crashes (51 per cent) on some other road.

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