Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Community Safety CCTV Moreland Council fails to deliver on CCTV promise after Jill Meagher’s murder Herald Sun 16.9.14




"It is understood council had to seek permission from POWER COMPANY AGL and 

government body VicTrack to attach the cameras to their poles."





Moreland Council fails to deliver on CCTV promise after Jill Meagher’s murder

Jill Meagher.
Jill Meagher.
ALMOST two years after Jill Meagher was killed while walking home alone from a Brunswick bar, the local council still hasn’t installed CCTV CAMERAS on the street where she was last seen alive.
Despite accepting $250,000 from the State Government and agreeing in June last year to install nine cameras along Sydney Rd, Moreland Council has failed to get any of those cameras working.
And new figures show that last year, 60 parolees were convicted of a violent or sexual offence committed after they were given early release. On average, they reoffended within six months of release.
In a sign that there are still serious problems with the state’s parole system one in four of the offences — which included seven sex offences — was committed in the year to June.
The figures from the Adult Parole Board annual report, tabled in Parliament yesterday, show 60 parolees were convicted of 75 offences, including 24 aggravated burglaries; 17 threats to kill; 11 of causing SERIOUS INJURY; 11 armed robberies; three kidnappings; and one manslaughter.
Corrections Minister Edward O’Donohue said there were “good signs”.
Thousands of people attend the Jill Meagher peace march along Sydney Road.
Thousands of people attend the Jill Meagher peace march along Sydney Road.
“Under the Coalition Government’s reforms, fewer offenders were GRANTED parole and almost double the number of offenders were denied parole,” Mr O’Donohue said.
But he slammed Moreland Council for its failure to install the nine cameras.
“It is just extraordinary that Moreland Council has utterly failed in delivering this CCTV SYSTEM in the interests of community safety, when they have been given the money to buy the cameras, and Victoria Police has advised it.”
The Herald Sun can reveal Moreland Council has installed four of the nine CCTV CAMERAS along Sydney Rd, Brunswick, but none is operational despite the installation of signs advising that CCTV is operating in the area.
Moreland Mayor Lambros Tapinos said the camera rollout was much more complex than simply putting a camera on a pole.
Moreland has installed cameras - but none is operational.
Moreland has installed cameras - but none is OPERATIONAL.
“The rollout of the cameras has been frustratingly slow, because of many layers of permissions required from the POWER COMPANIES and from other owners of the light poles in the municipality,” Mr Tapinos said.
“Four of the nine cameras are installed and another four will be installed this week.
“We are looking forward to the system being operational as soon as possible,” he said.
It is understood council had to seek permission from POWER COMPANY AGL and government body VicTrack to attach the cameras to their poles.
The council was offered $250,000 by the Government in February 2013 to buy cameras for Sydney Rd, where Ms Meagher was last seen before being killed in September 2012.
It took four months for the council to accept the government FUNDING.
Under the Government’s FUNDING deal, council has to pay for the installation and maintenance of the cameras, and the vision will be fed to local police once working.
The equipment to send the footage, monitor it and store it wirelessly has been installed at the Brunswick watchhouse.


Monday, September 15, 2014

Cycling Beach Road Bunch Cycling Negligence Difficulty Stopping Safely Road Rule 126 Comment by Pete Dowe Hell Ride Community Safety No Stopping Zones




















There are “No formal training programs to develop bunch riding skills...”


Monash University Accident Research Centre (2009)





  • Supervision is the key. Don’t let your child near the road unsupervised until you are sure they can stop safely and cross roads safely.




Bicycle Victoria's Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria (2002)









I argue that the “Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure



"has a duty of care to ensure that reasonable action is taken to minimise the risk of harm to anyone who is reasonably likely to be affected by the department's activities.”


I argue that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure

“may be found to be negligent where a failure to take reasonable care results in some injury or loss.”


I argue it is negligent for a cycling bunch to be a “No Stopping Zone”
as it affects the safety of all road users and bunch cyclists have a duty of care to each other

and other road users to keep a safe stopping distance behind the bicycle vehicle in front
and to form cycle bunches which can stop safely.



I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local 

Infrastructure’s legislate such a collective responsibility, duty of care, to stop safely

on the part of riders participating in a cycling bunch.



Cycling Bunch size also affects stopping distance and the ability to stop safely,

partly by limiting the amount of incompetent riders.

The Code of Conduct for Training Cyclists recommends a maximum bunch size of 20 riders.

I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure’s



legislate a maximum bunch size of 20 riders to address difficulty stopping safely.






The CycleSport Victoria and Amy Gillett Foundation submission to Coroner Johnstone’s inquest into the death of Pedestrian James Gould stated:

“The evidence establishes that there can be difficulties,
especially for inexperienced cyclists, in stopping safely 
when traffic lights are red, when they are riding in bunches.”

There is no required standard to achieve before bunch cycling on the road.

Bunch cyclists form bunches which likely cannot stop safely,
cannot stop without rear-ending the cyclist in front,

and the fear of being rear-ended is then used
as a justification for cyclists proceeding through red traffic signals.

It ought not be.

I argue it is negligent for a cycling bunch to be a “No Stopping Zone”
as it affects the safety of all road users and bunch cyclists have a duty of care to each other

and other road users to keep a safe stopping distance behind the bicycle vehicle in front
and to form cycle bunches which can stop safely.

I argue that bunch cyclists also do not stop safely and proceed through red traffic signals because

there is no group responsibility.

I advocate that there be such a group responsibility in bunch cycling, 

and that all riders in the bunch be responsible for the bunch being able to stop safely.

I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local 

Infrastructure’s legislate such a collective responsibility, duty of care, to stop safely

on the part of riders participating in a cycling bunch.

Cycling Bunch size also affects stopping distance and the ability to stop safely,

partly by limiting the amount of incompetent riders.

The Code of Conduct for Training Cyclists recommends a maximum bunch size of 20 riders.

I advocate that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure’s



Thursday, September 11, 2014

Cycling Death Fatality Negligence Unlicensed Driver Suspended Four Month Jail Sentence Tasmania Hobart Mercury 12.9.14



"The magistrate sentenced McCulloch to four months’ jail, but suspended the sentence 

on condition he not commit another offence punishable by a prison term for three years."





Mr Daley said the ­cyclists would have been visible to McCulloch for up to 12 seconds before the crash and no blame could be attached to Mr Saunders.






“Given he was found guilty and there was no obvious reason he shouldn’t have seen the riders, this seems to be a very light sentence,” Ms Pharo said.







Michael Lee McCulloch handed suspended term for causing the death of cyclist Craig Saunders by negligent driving 

DAVID KILLICK MERCURY SEPTEMBER 12, 2014 12:00AM


Family and friends of deceased cyclist Craig Saunders, including riding buddy Steve Barre
Family and friends of deceased cyclist Craig Saunders, including riding buddy Steve Barrett, far right, outside court after sentencing.

AN unlicensed driver who failed to see a cyclist wearing high-visibility clothing in daylight on a straight stretch of road has been given a suspended jail term for killing the man. 

The sentence was condemned as inadequate by the state’s peak cycling body.

Michael Lee McCulloch, 50, was last week found guilty of causing the death of another person by negligent driving.

McCulloch pleaded guilty to driving while not the holder of a driver’s ­licence

Hobart Magistrates Court heard McCulloch did not swerve or brake before he drove his ute at 80km/h into Pelverata man Craig Saunders, 57, on the road between Huonville and Cygnet on the morning of ­August 5 last year.

Mr Saunders died on the way to hospital.

Michael Lee McCulloch, 50, of Ranelagh, leaves the Hobart Magistrates Court after yesterd

Michael Lee McCulloch, 50, of Ranelagh, leaves the Hobart Magistrates Court after yesterday’s sentencing.

Start of sidebar. Skip to end of sidebar.End of sidebar. Return to start of sidebar.

McCulloch said he didn’t see Mr Saunders or his riding companion Steve Barrett in the seconds before the collision. His claim the sun was in his eyes was ­rejected by Deputy Chief Magistrate Michael Daley.

During sentencing yesterday, Mr Daley noted McCulloch was unlicensed at the time and that he had a poor driving record, including four convictions for drink-driving.

Victim impact statements from Mr Saunders’s partner and children were tendered to the court.

Mr Barrett, who was riding with Mr Saunders at the time, told the court he continued to be plagued with memories of the crash and pleaded with motorists to take more care.

“Cyclists are fragile, with little protection. We just ask for respect and a few ­moments of a driver’s time. If this was forthcoming, fewer people would have to go through the ordeal we have all just experienced,” he said.

Mr Daley said the ­cyclists would have been visible to McCulloch for up to 12 seconds before the crash and no blame could be attached to Mr Saunders.

“If the defendant has been keeping a proper lookout he would have seen him,” he said.

“Cyclists simply were not on Mr McCulloch’s radar.”

The magistrate said a jail term was the only appropriate penalty in the case.

“I must send a message to the community that inattentive driving — and inattentive driving in the case of cyclists — is to be taken seriously,” he said.

Defence lawyer Steve Chopping said his client wished to apologise to Mr Saunders’s family.

“He will have the death of Mr Saunders on his conscience for the rest of his life,” Mr Chopping said.

The magistrate sentenced McCulloch to four months’ jail, but suspended the sentence on condition he not commit another offence punishable by a prison term for three years.

The father-of-four was ­ordered to perform 150 hours of community service and disqualified from driving for 18 months. The crime carries a maximum penalty of 12 months in jail and a $1300 fine.

Mr Saunders’s family and friends were present at court during the proceedings.

Bicycle Tasmania’s Emma Pharo said tougher penalties would provide greater protection for cyclists

“Given he was found guilty and there was no obvious reason he shouldn’t have seen the riders, this seems to be a very light sentence,” Ms Pharo said.

“There needs to be dis­incentives for drivers who aren’t careful.

“In serious offences like this one, some drivers should be disqualified for life.”



http://www.google.com/gwt/x?wsc=tf&u=http://www.themercury.com.au/news/scales-of-justice/michael-lee-mcculloch-handed-suspended-term-for-causing-the-death-of-cyclist-craig-saunders-by-negligent-driving/story-fnj8cre7-1227055213230&ei=gWASVObQFsPnmQWGnIHADg&ct=pg1&whp=30

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Suicide Anxiety Depression Manus Island detention unsuitable for women - and men The Age 9.9.14



“It is the start of a slippery slope when we give priority to a number over a name;

when we say that this place is unsafe for women and children,


but men can be sacrificed.”



Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/comment/manus-detention-unsuitable-for-women--and-men-20140908-10drzw.html#ixzz3CuZGezXO




Manus detention unsuitable for women - and men

Date

Susan Metcalfe

When calls are made for compassion to be shown towards asylum seekers arriving to Australia, the focus often turns to the vulnerability of women and children in detention centres. Women and children do face particular and extreme risks in these environments, but the consequences when governments downgrade the needs of men can be seen playing out on Manus Island right now.
The Manus Island detention centre is considered inappropriate for women and children and is used only for males over 18. This wasn't always the case – women and children were detained in Manus by the previous Labor government and by former prime minister John Howard under his "Pacific Solution". But if the centre is now unsuitable for women and children (as it clearly always has been), then it is surely also unsuitable for men.
Last week, a former Manus Island security guard told Channel Ten that diseases resulting from a lack of medical care were rampant in the centre. He said the centre was "absolute filth" and "I wouldn't let my dog live in it". But this "absolute filth" is what Australia deems appropriate for 1084 men.
Just imagine that any one of these men could be your sensitive son, your frail father, a male friend, brother, partner, yourself (if you are male). Imagine men who are separated from families, men crying at night for their children. Young men away from mothers for the first time. Men who are scared. Men grappling with recent memories of torture in conflict zones. Men crippled by the uncertainty. Men struggling with their sexuality. Teenage boys trying to become men. Men who are, before anything else, human.
Just stop and imagine. Innocent men thrown indefinitely inside a filthy prison, with other men, each reacting differently to the pressures of the situation.
These are not the trained men we send off to war, these are men fleeing from conflict and persecution. These are men who have committed no crime in asking for asylum in Australia. Yet we expect them to submit quietly to incarceration in an unfamiliar country, while we pressure them to return to places of persecution.
The damage we inflict on these men begins the moment we label them as "queue-jumpers" or "illegals". It continues when we fail to acknowledge individual histories, cultures, languages, specific vulnerabilities, or the unique circumstances from which each man has fled. It is the start of a slippery slope when we give priority to a number over a name; when we say that this place is unsafe for women and children, but men can be sacrificed.
We know that stereotypes of masculinity or culturally defined roles can often constrain men from speaking about their distress. Men are supposed to bear pain in silence, "be a man" about their situation. We know that men are often reluctant to ask for help. But the suffering of the men we incarcerate in Manus is painfully transparent - these men are begging for our help.
In February, Reza Barati - described as a "gentle giant" by friends - was murdered inside the Manus centre. Another man lost an eye in the same violence. Many others were badly injured. All the men in the centre were terrorised and traumatised by the experience. Yet nearly seven months later, these men remain locked up inside a place of "absolute filth" – still fearful and uncertain of their future.
Last month, another young man cut his foot at the filthy centre and died on Friday night in a Brisbane hospital. Hamid Kehazaei, described by his mother as "the most gentle and loving" of all her children, was sacrificed - needlessly, carelessly, by governments playing games with the lives of innocent human beings.
Both the Australian and the PNG governments have continued to deliberately mislead the men we detain in Manus and the Australian people. Of the 1084 men now detained, only 79 have received initial refugee status decisions. Why so few? No one will explain.
PNG's Prime Minister Peter O'Neill claimed in March that "a good majority" of the men were not refugees – before they had even been assessed. Tony Abbott backed him up. But so far more than half the men with interim decisions have indeed been found to be refugees, by a process that is hardly designed to err on the side of caution.
Abbott told us the resettlement of Manus refugees would begin in May. Scott Morrison said June. Now we hear from a PNG cabinet member that it could be "end of the year". But even if resettlement in PNG does go ahead, experience tells us the difficulties will be insurmountable and the men will need to be resettled elsewhere.
We should be fighting for the rights of women and children – both in Australia and within the region, where the focus should turn to providing options that don't involve dangerous boat travel. But we should also be fighting for men.
Men are often perpetrators of violence, but they are also the victims. Men around the world often have more power than women, but these individual men have no power. And these men have families, they have women and children in their lives, now suffering because of their mistreatment. The consequences of dehumanising these men cannot be contained within the fences of their prison.
If we care about the men who have drowned in the ocean on their way to Australia, if we care about the men in our own lives, Australians should be standing up to call for an end to the suffering we inflict on these men.
Susan Metcalfe is the author of The Pacific Solution.


Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/comment/manus-detention-unsuitable-for-women--and-men-20140908-10drzw.html#ixzz3CyATfhSu










Community Safety Preventable Deaths Fatalities Suicide is the #1 killer of young australians, and it is almost always preventable ReachOut Anxiety Depression


September 10th is #WorldSuicidePreventionDay. 

Suicide is the #1 killer of young australians, and it is almost always preventable.

Know how to help:http://bit.ly/1At7tai 


https://www.facebook.com/ReachOutAUS

Community Safety Stalking Men who use technology to stalk victims targeted in new campaign The Age 9.9.14


This blog commends this vital community safety education campaign initiative 

but expresses disappointment at the continued focus re domestic violence 

on the victims of one gender only 

and the wrongdoers of one gender only


Pete Dowe



"Safety Net Australia is based on a US program which works with legal services, domestic violence specialists and corporate giants such as Google and Facebook to help women fleeing abusive relationships use technology safely."


"Under Safety Net Australia, domestic violence specialists will learn about new technologies and those escaping violence will be taught how to increase privacy settings on their devices and how to identify when their digital security has been breached."




Men who use technology to stalk victims targeted in new campaign

Men who use technology to stalk their victims are the target of a new program to tackle the increasing misuse of technology in domestic violence cases.
Men who use technology to stalk their victims are the target of a new program to tackle the increasing misuse of technology in domestic violence cases.
Men who use devices such as GPS trackers and computer spyware to stalk and harass their victims are the target of a new program launched by the peak national women's organisation to tackle the increasing misuse of technology in domestic violence cases.
Safety Net Australia is based on a US program which works with legal services, domestic violence specialists and corporate giants such as Google and Facebook to help women fleeing abusive relationships use technology safely.
Founder of the US program Cindy Southworth said new  technology meant abusers could easily monitor their victims' movements through devices such as GPS trackers, computer keyboard loggers or a webcam with remote access. 
"Tactics that abusers use haven't changed - it's about power and control," she said.
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"Decades ago abusers would monitor the odometer on the car to see if the victim had left the house during the day when she had been instructed not to leave the house without permission from the offender. Now instead of checking the odometer they can check the GPS on the phone or put a freestanding location tracker on the car itself. Same behaviour, new tools."
Safety Net Australia is being rolled out by the Women's Services Network, with chairwoman Julie Oberin saying the case of Simon Gittany, who murdered his partner Lisa Harnum, illustrated how offenders use technology to intimidate.
"He surveilled her every movement," she said.
Under Safety Net Australia, domestic violence specialists will learn about new technologies and those escaping violence will be taught how to increase privacy settings on their devices and how to identify when their digital security has been breached.
Ms Oberin said women who complained their abusive former partners always found out their whereabouts were previously thought to be paranoid or delusional.
"But now we know the men are tracking these women," she said.
"Often a perpetrator will smash a woman's phone, then buy her a new one which is already loaded so he can find out what she's doing, where she's  going and who she is talking to on his own iPhone or computer. We've had children with GPS tracking devices in their teddy bears."
Spyware and GPS trackers can be easily obtained, she said.
"They're cheap, you can get them almost instantly and even YouTube the instructions about how to set them up," she said.
Ms Southworth said companies which manufacture devices that can be used to spy should be more responsible but noted the flipside of technology misuse was that it could be used as legal evidence against the offender.
"It's an incredibly good tool for holding offenders accountable," she said. "Digital evidence is incredibly compelling."
The program has the backing of the federal government with Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for Women, Michaelia Cash, saying it would be an important tool for police, domestic violence specialists and survivors.
From The Web


Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/business/world-business/men-who-use-technology-to-stalk-victims-targeted-in-new-campaign-20140908-10dr1q.html#ixzz3CuQwlu44







The Age 9.9.14

http://www.theage.com.au/business/world-business/men-who-use-technology-to-stalk-victims-targeted-in-new-campaign-20140908-10dr1q.html