Friday, January 23, 2015

Cycling Ride the Night Melbourne Feb 1st 2015 VicRoads Refuses Permit Victoria Police strongly opposes Dangerous mass night bike ride will “increase the potential for night time road trauma”.Herald Sun online Jan. 16th 2015 & Bayside Leader online Jan 20th 2015



Cycling for Recreation is about "Safe exercise"


Cycling for Transport is also about "Safe low-emission travel" 




Pete Dowe




‘Dangerous’ night bike ride with 2000 cyclists to push ahead

The Ride the Night event plans to see 2000 cyclists ride from the city to Albert Park.
The Ride the Night event plans to see 2000 cyclists ride from the city to Albert Park.
ORGANISERS of a controversial bike event have vowed to push ahead with the “all-night ride”, despite police and VicRoads warning it is dangerous, a waste of emergency services’ time and could end in carnage.
The Ride the Night event plans to see 2000 cyclists ride from the city to Albert Park between midnight and 6am, stopping at “mini-parties” along the way.
Police strongly oppose the event, saying the mass weekend ride through the CBD could clash with weekend revellers and “increase the potential for night time road trauma”.
Ride the Night sold out in November, but is in limbo after authorities refused to issue a permit, citing numerous safety concerns. VicRoads has also vowed to block the midnight cycling event — with Melbourne City Council likely to follow.
Bicycle Network chief executive Craig Richards said it was highly unlikely the event would need to be cancelled.
“We don’t believe the date is going to change. We certainly think the ride is going ahead,” Mr Richards said.
He said it was not unusual for big events to be granted a permit just days before they started and said the care of riders and the public was organisers’ highest priority.
“We take great care of our riders. We have professional traffic management people all along the route,” he said.
He denied riders would clash with revellers saying “we’re not going down King St” and adding the route was carefully selected.
He did concede there were things that needed to be modified and he would work with police and VicRoads.
Inspector Damien Christensen said Victoria Police first raised concerns with the organisers in December 2013 and they still had not been properly addressed.
Concerns include a lack of bicycle lanes along the route and the event taking place during peak demand times for police and emergency services.
“Victoria Police has advised VicRoads that the safety concerns raised have not been adequately addressed by the organisers. VicRoads then decided to not issue a permit to the organisers of the event,” Mr Christensen said.
The fundraiser  hoped to raise $300,000 for the Youth Support and Advocacy Service, also known as YSAS, which helps vulnerable young adults battling substance abuse.
christopher.gillett@news.com.au

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/dangerous-night-bike-ride-with-2000-cyclists-to-push-ahead/story-fni0fit3-1227187593709


    

  • Article rank
  • 20 Jan 2015
  • Bayside Leader
  • Dana McCauley
MASS CHARITY BIKE RIDE UNDER THREAT
AUTHORITIES CONCERNED ABOUT POTENTIAL SAFETY ISSUES
MELBOURNE’S inaugural all-night cycling event may not go ahead, with VicRoads so far refusing to issue a permit for the sold-out Ride the Night.
When the Leader went to print on Friday — 15 days before the ride — the agency, lcouncils and police refused to approve it on safety grounds. But Bicycle Network Victoria general manager Darren Allen said he was confident it would go ahead.
“We’re working really closely with Vicroads, police and councils to address the problems that have been raised,” Mr Allen said.
Victoria Police spokeswoman Belinda Batty listed safety concerns with the 70km route through the CBD, Parkville, Fitzroy North, Footscray, Port Melbourne, St Kilda and Albert Park – and a nailbiting ride over the Westgate Bridge – on a busy Saturday night.
Concerns included a lack of separated bicycle lanes; the event coinciding with peak demand times for police and emergency services; risk posed by pedestrians in entertainment precincts along the route;and rider fatigue.
Vicroads spokeswoman Gail Carland said the agency had declined to issue a permit, but was still negotiating with organisers.
Albert Park cyclist Mark Dempsey said he would be disappointed if the ride was cancelled “especially after all the training a lot of us have been doing.”

Thursday, January 22, 2015

Cycling Hell Ride VIDEO 'Road Train' Beach Road Bunch Cycling No Stopping Zones COMMENT by Pete Dowe Mordialloc, Kingston, Melbourne You Tube Published Dec. 21st 2014 Road Rule 126 Difficulty Stopping Negligence Road Rule 151 Two Abreast Bunch Size Rec. Max. 20 Riders Community Safety



Cycling for Recreation is about "Safe exercise"


Cycling for Transport is also about "Safe low-emission travel" 



Pete Dowe






What history teaches us is that the moment finite Police resources are redeployed elsewhere 

the Hell Ride balloons once again and reverts to being a law unto itself.


The Hell Ride will need constant Police supervision with the taxpayer footing the bill.


Pete Dowe
Road Safety Advocate
April 30th 2014





This blog strongly opposes certain suggested reforms


VicRoads is currently considering:


"under one suggested reform, 

cyclists could be allowed to treat red lights as Give Way signs. 

And the same could also APPLY at pedestrian lights."   

Also

"PERMITTING cyclists, riding cautiously, to proceed past a stationary tram;"



"ALLOWING all riders to use the footpath, provided that they give way to pedestrians."

Herald Sun 12.9.14








Comment by Pete Dowe



Cycling for Recreation is about "Safe exercise."


Cycling for Transport is also about "Safe low-emission travel" 



This blog commends Moorabbin Highway Patrol’s efforts to reduce and diminish the risks to community safety caused by the Hell Ride: 

an unofficial bunch cycling road race on public roads.

Police have deployed three police motorcycles and two marked cars to supervise the Hell Ride.

These significant police resources are provided at considerable expense to the community and taxpayer.

Many citizens might argue that five police vehicles could be put to better use than supervising recalcitrant, negligent, reckless cycling.

These cyclists shamefully participate on public roads in a disgraceful unofficial road race which ought not exist.

Police say it may take some time to reduce the risks to the community presented by those participants of the Hell Ride.

What history teaches us is that the moment finite Police resources are redeployed elsewhere the Hell Ride balloons once again and reverts to being a law unto itself.

The Hell Ride will need constant Police supervision with the taxpayer footing the bill.

Pete Dowe
Road Safety Advocate
April 30th 2014







https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SS7SQJwnGNo
 


Hell Ride, Beach Road, Kingston, You Tube Published 21/12/14



Community Safety Bullying Beyond Blue "If you see it, call it" Covert Bullying CyberBullying Vigilantism Hyper-Vigilantism

 

Beyond Blue If you see it call it

CyberBullying Covert Bullying


“People have a responsibility to report any cyberbullying they see on social media and it’s not difficult to do.“

On a Facebook page for example, click the cog, which is often near the like or message button, scroll down to “report page” and choose the reason why you want it reported.

“It only takes a minute and you could help prevent real harm to the person targeted.

“It’s not acceptable at school or work in the physical world, so why should you stand for it online?

beyondblue CEO Kate Carnell AO


 

 

 Media releases




Bullying: “If you see it, call it,” urges beyondblue CEO

Mar 2013

beyondblue CEO Kate Carnell AO has today supported the National Day of Action Against Bullying and Violence and asked all Australians to think about how they can take action.

Ms Carnell said people should follow the mantra of “If you see it, call it” to ensure bullies everywhere know their behaviour is unacceptable.

The National Day of Action Against Bullying and Violence is organised by Australian education authorities and will see schools across the country participate to strengthen the message that bullying and violence are never ok.

Ms Carnell said the growing popularity of social media had led to a rise in cyberbullying, which means people can even be targeted in their homes where they should feel safe.

“Cyberbullying, just like any form of bullying, is unacceptable and if you see it, call it,” she said.

beyondblue has developed a cyberbullying fact sheet, which is accessible from youthbeyondblue.com or by calling 1300 22 4636.

“This is an excellent resource for people who may be experiencing cyberbullying or who may know someone who is.

“It contains information about what cyberbullying is, along with advice on stopping it and how to avoid being part of the cyberbullying cycle.

“I would particularly encourage those who care for young people to look at it and to get the young people to read it too.

“People have a responsibility to report any cyberbullying they see on social media and it’s not difficult to do.

“On a Facebook page for example, click the cog, which is often near the like or message button, scroll down to “report page” and choose the reason why you want it reported.

“It only takes a minute and you could help prevent real harm to the person targeted.

“It’s not acceptable at school or work in the physical world, so why should you stand for it online?

“Being cyberbullied can leave you feeling defeated, worthless, helpless and overwhelmed, but with proper guidance and support, you can counteract it and deny the bullies any satisfaction they may derive from their discriminatory actions.”

Ms Carnell said if people did not take a stand against bullying, it could reinforce the idea that such behaviour is ok.

“It doesn’t matter if it’s in the workplace, at school or online, any form of bullying is unacceptable.

“Bullying is a major cause of stress which, if it continues for a long-time, can lead to depression and anxiety.

“It can do real damage to people’s lives which is why we all have a responsibility to speak up and stop it where we can.

“I ask everyone to be on the lookout for it and to have the courage to call it.”

Media professionals wanting further information, a comment or an interview should contact the media team.


http://www.beyondblue.org.au/media/media-releases/media-releases/bullying-if-you-see-it-call-it-urges-beyondblue-ceo