Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Community Safety Murder Female Aggression Eva Whitecross, 53, charged with murdering Female Victim Rachel Tyquin, Sunbury, Melbourne Prosecutor says more time needed to prepare case over Sunbury stabbing murder The Age April 19th 2016 Violence by Women against Women "Female Aggression, Physical or Emotional is a Female Community Safety Issue" Pete Dowe #VICforWomen #genderequality #victoriaagainstviolence #uniteandchange #16days #domesticviolence #emotionalviolence #VICforWomen #genderspecific #gender-equalapplicationofthelaw "violence is not gender specific. Whether it’s a man or a woman hitting you, you’re still being hit.”






Female Aggression, Physical or Emotional is a Female Community Safety Issue


Pete Dowe


"...(physical) violence is not gender specific. Whether it’s a man or a woman hitting you, you’re still being hit.”

News.com.au

November 8, 2015

One wonders how many Melburnians speculated on when "the bad Man" who murdered the woman walking would be caught
such is the gender-specific approach to violence which feeds 

such gender-specific assumptions re perpetrators





Pete Dowe

Prosecutor says more time needed to prepare case over Sunbury stabbing murder

Date

Caitlin Guilfoyle

Personal trainer Rachel Tyquin was allegedly murdered by her neighbour.
Personal trainer Rachel Tyquin was allegedly murdered by her neighbour. Photo: Facebook
Police need more time to gather evidence over the alleged stabbing murder of a woman on a suburban Melbourne street, a court has heard.
Eva Whitecross, 53, is charged with murdering Rachel Tyquin, whose body was found on a Sunbury nature strip on the weekend.
The 44-year-old had been fatally stabbed in the neck, police have said.
Ms Whitecross did not apply for bail and was remanded in custody when she appeared briefly in the Melbourne Magistrates' Court on Tuesday.
Prosecutor Susanna Locke said police would need longer than normal to prepare evidence.
Post-mortem results would take about 15 weeks and there was significant CCTV footage to be examined, she told the court.
"There is [also] a high volume of material in relation to family history," Ms Locke said.
Investigators are planning to take statements from neighbours and the Sunbury community.
Ms Whitecross is due to appear before the court again on September 13.
Asked if there were any custody management issues, her lawyer said Whitecross had an injury.
AAP

Monday, May 2, 2016

Community Safety Manslaughter Family Violence Female Aggression Ringwood, Melbourne Woman Lisa Marie Clark found Guilty of Manslaughter will serve a minimum term of three years in prison for fatally stabbing her Male Cousin Rodney Clark abc.net.au/news July 30th 2015


A Melbourne mother-of-three who claimed self-defence in the fatal stabbing of her violent cousin has been jailed for five years.


Clark will serve a minimum term of three years in prison.

Melbourne mother sentenced to five years jail for fatally stabbing violent cousin in 'self-defence'

Updated 30 Jul 2015, 3:01pm
A Melbourne mother-of-three who claimed self-defence in the fatal stabbing of her violent cousin has been jailed for five years.
The Victorian Supreme Court heard Lisa Clark described to police "something just clicking" when she picked up a large kitchen knife and stabbed Rodney Clark in the doorway of her family's Ringwood home last year.
The court heard Mr Clark had previously attacked the 40-year-old by striking her in the face three times, and had become embroiled in an argument with her former partner after arriving at the house intoxicated.
A small child was also at the home.
Clark pleaded guilty to manslaughter earlier this year.
In sentencing, Justice Lex Lasry accepted Clark was frightened of her cousin and acted impulsively when she stabbed the 44-year-old and ran back into the house, leaving the knife embedded in his chest.
Neighbours reported screaming and yelling coming from the home and Mr Clark died at the scene before paramedics arrived.
The court heard Clark was part-indigenous and was raised by her grandparents.
You were certainly wary and frightened of the deceased man
Justice Lex Lasry
Her mother took her own life when she was 14-years old, and she spent long periods of time at railway stations and dabbling in drugs, the court heard.
Her grandfather was described as a regular heavy drinker who often had violent confrontations with her grandmother and it was often the children in the home who tried to break up the violence.
Clark's grandfather was also abusive towards her.
The court heard Clark had also been the victim of racism and education was "a struggle" after she acquired a brain injury in a childhood accident.
Although she described her cousin as "like a brother", she also said he was a violent person and a woman basher" and claimed self-defence in the killing.
"This is a very serious and tragic accident," Justice Lasry told Clark.
"Your actions were spontaneous and emotional."

Clark 'deserving of an opportunity'

Justice Lasry said a character reference from her employer at an aged-care home spoke of Clark's empathy and compassion and noted she felt valued in the role.
He said he was in no doubt Clark felt deep remorse for her cousin's death.
"I do accept that at the time of this offence, apart from being fatigued, you were depressed and your functioning was affected by your mental state," Justice Lasry told Clark.
"You were certainly wary and frightened of the deceased man.
"I do place significant weight on your deprived background...apart from your mental state it is not surprising that someone who has suffered the emotional turmoil you have in the early stages of life finds coping with stressful situations difficult."
Clark was supported in court by several family members.
Justice Lasry said Clark had been portrayed as "committed to your family with many good qualities, particularly as a mother".
"The deceased had been violent toward you on previous occasions and you were not well equipped to handle the emotional aggression you encountered," he said.
"You are remorseful, you pleaded guilty and you have good prospects for a life beyond this case."
"You are a woman with a supportive family and plenty of life left to live. I think you are someone deserving of an opportunity."
Clark will serve a minimum term of three years in prison.
First posted 30 Jul 2015, 1:39pm

Friday, April 29, 2016

Community Safety Manslaughter Family Violence Female Aggression Seaford, Melbourne Lisa McLaughlin,51, was sentenced to time already served 76 weeks 5 days Lisa McLaughlin, stabbed Graham Stevens, 31, from behind after an argument, fatally piercing an artery.Lisa McLaughlin walks free after court heard her life unravelled when she lost her son in a boating accident Daily Mail Australia April 29th 2016 "What's a Man's life worth?" Pete Dowe #genderequality #victoriaagainstviolence #uniteandchange #16days #familyviolence #domesticviolence #emotionalviolence #VICforWomen #genderspecific #rcfv #malevictims


Lisa McLaughlin, 51, stabbed Graham Stevens, 31, from behind after an argument, fatally piercing an artery.

Lisa McLaughlin, was sentenced to time already served, she spent 537 days in custody after her arrest. 76 weeks 5 days


What's a Man's life worth?

Pete Dowe



Former pharmaceutical executive and ice addict, 51, who fatally stabbed her young lover, 31, walks free after court heard her life unravelled when she lost her son in a boating accident

  • Lisa McLaughlin, 51, was sentenced to time already served on Friday
  • She walks free after pleading guilty to the manslaughter of her lover
  • McLaughlin stabbed boyfriend Graham Stevens while on ice in 2014
  • She picked up a drug addiction after her son's death in a boat accident
A woman who stabbed her lover to death with a glass pipe while high on ice after the death of her young son has walked free.
Lisa McLaughlin, 51, was sentenced on Friday to time already served, a two-year community corrections order and 100 hours of unpaid community work, The Age reported.
McLaughlin, who pleaded guilty to the manslaughter of her ice-addicted boyfriend Graham Stevens on September 2014, had already spent 537 days in custody after her arrest.
Lisa McLaughlin (right) has walked free after serving time for killing her lover Graham Stevens (left)
Lisa McLaughlin (right) has walked free after serving time for killing her lover Graham Stevens (left)
McLaughlin picked up an ice addiction and started seeing Mr Stevens after the death of her son Zane (pictured)
McLaughlin picked up an ice addiction and started seeing Mr Stevens after the death of her son Zane (pictured)
Supreme Court Justice Terry Forrest said it was time for the mother to pick herself up for the sake of her remaining two children.
McLaughlin’s life became unhinged and she turned to ice when she lost her five-year-old son, Zane, in a boat accident in April 2008.
She cradled her son's lifeless body in her arms until he died after the family's boat collided with another vessel in the Patterson River, southeast of Melbourne.
McLaughlin, a successful pharmaceutical executive before the incident, suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder and a major depressive illness.
She lost her job, left her husband and in 2011 started dating Mr Stevens - entering into a volatile relationship that was defined by their mutual drug use.
McLaughlin stabbed Stevens, 31, from behind after an argument, fatally piercing an artery.
McLaughlin's life spiraled out of control after the death of her son
Graham Stevens, 31, was stabbed by McLaughlin after an argument
The relationship between McLaughlin and Mr Stevens was volatile and defined by their mutual drug use
McLaughlin's son died in a boating accident on the Patterson River, southeast of Melbourne
McLaughlin's son died in a boating accident on the Patterson River, southeast of Melbourne
McLaughlin stabbed Stevens, 31, from behind after an argument, fatally piercing an artery
McLaughlin stabbed Stevens, 31, from behind after an argument, fatally piercing an artery



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3565027/Lisa-McLaughlin-stabbed-younger-lover-death-walks-free-jail.html#ixzz47GUNtLov
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3565027/Lisa-McLaughlin-stabbed-younger-lover-death-walks-free-jail.html

Monday, April 25, 2016

Community Safety Cyberbullying Street Harassment Where is the line between normal behaviour and harassment? dailylife.com.au April 14, 2016 #vigilante #rumourspread #hypervigilantism Be a supportive bystander: Violence, Harassment and Bullying


Would we include female #vigilante #rumourspread mobile phone text, photo and social media #cyberbullying as #streetharassment?                              

Or does the victim deserve it cos they "musta done somethin" and make vigilantes perpetrate?


Pete Dowe



"I feel very scared and small, I want to take up less space in the world and not be noticed... It makes me feel like I don't deserve a place in the world, that I'm just here for other people. I feel completely impotent, vulnerable and exposed, like I don't matter at all."


I know the feeling


Pete Dowe




#CyberbullyingLaw


"Under (Australian) Commonwealth law it is an offence to “use a carriage service to menace, harass or cause offence, or for the purposes of a threat”. 13 It is also an offence to “knowingly or recklessly use a telecommunications service in such a way as would be regarded by reasonable persons being, in all the circumstances, offensive”



Penalty Max. 3 years Imprisonment



·         Make it clear to your friends that you won’t be involved in bullying behaviour
·         Never stand by and watch or encourage bullying behaviour
·         Do not harass, tease or spread gossip about others, this includes on social networking sites like Facebook 
·         Never forward on or respond to messages or photos that may be offensive or upsetting
·         Support the person who is being bullied to ask for help e.g. go with them to a place they can get help or provide them with information about where to go for help
·         Report it to someone in authority or someone you trust e.g. at school to a teacher, or a school counsellor; at work to a manager; if the bullying is serious, report it to the police; if the bullying occurs on Facebook, report it to Facebook.



Where is the line between normal behaviour and harassment?

Date

    Dr Bianca Fileborn

    "Street harassment is not a compliment. It is a form of violence and abuse with serious consequences. It has to stop."
    "Street harassment is not a compliment. It is a form of violence and abuse with serious consequences. It has to stop."Photo: Stocksy
    Street harassment is, for many of us, a routine experience in pubic spaces. In fact, it's so common that almost every woman and LGBTIQ person reading this article will have experienced it at least once in their lifetime (and, let's face it, probably much more frequently than that).
    Street harassment is a somewhat slippery concept. Catcalling, staring, unwanted verbal comments, car-horn honking and being followed are all common examples of this behaviour. Yet, it can be difficult to determine when something becomes 'harassment' or not. Some of these actions can also constitute perfectly normal interactions in public spaces, and it's not always easy to know where to draw the line between something being 'normal' and 'harassment'.
    Perhaps this is part of the reason we frequently hear street harassment dismissed as being a 'compliment', as something to be expected in public life. What's the big deal, right? Besides, how will the human race survive if we can't make sexual advances towards random strangers on the street? (Because we've all heard the romantic tale of how a couple got together after one partner leaned out the car window and screamed "nice tits").
    When we start to look more closely at the finer details of women and LGBTIQ people's experiences, it becomes harder to accept or interpret street harassment as any kind of genuine compliment or an attempt to meet a new sexual or romantic partner. My own Melbourne-based research with 292 people who've experienced street harassment sheds some light on the harms and impacts of street harassment and shows why we need to take it seriously.
    To be sure, some of the people who took part in my research experienced forms of street harassment that could (from certain perspectives) be seen as a 'compliment'. Indeed, a small number of people even expressly stated that they occasionally found certain types of street harassment complimentary or flattering – although they also usually preferred that it didn't happen nonetheless.
    If at least some individuals experience street harassment as welcome or 'complimentary' behaviour, this creates a degree of ambiguity regarding the legitimacy and intent of those who engage in these acts. This is reinforced by a cultural context that willingly (mis)interprets the actions of perpetrators as harmless flirting, regardless of the actual intent or lack of sexual ethics underpinning the behaviour.
    Although, as many of my own participants pointed out, street harassment is rarely intended as a genuine sexual advance, often demonstrated by the perpetrators' complete lack of regard for the impact of their behaviour on their supposed 'romantic' interest. A supposedly 'complimentary' action would quickly transform into one of hostility and abuse if the 'wrong' response was given.
    However, many of my participants more 'typical' experiences expose and challenge the idea that street harassment is a compliment. It is anything but.
    Take, for example a non-binary participant who had their bottom squeezed so hard by a man in a large shopping centre that they were bruised the next day. Or the woman who was terrified after a man followed her in his car as she walked home. Or the countless experiences of being told to smile, or having to hear unsolicited comments about and appraisals of our appearance, dress, or 'fuckability'.
    Street harassment often came with a distinct flavour of homophobia, transphobia, ableism, or racism and orientalism. For example, men called one woman an "Asian slut" as she crossed the road, while another participant with a disability was routinely referred to as "a walking head job".
    Men were almost universally the perpetrators of these actions, acting alone or in groups.
    The harms and impacts experienced by people in my research clearly illustrate that street harassment is not a compliment.
    Participants would use words like anger, fear, shaking, vulnerable, powerless, uncomfortable, frustrated, panic, anxiety, scared, dirty, violated, unsafe, shocked, self-conscious, feeling inferior and small, ashamed, and sick to capture the harms and impacts of public harassment. Surely 'complimentary' actions should result in much more positive feelings than this.
    Many felt unsafe, and unable to freely access and use public spaces and public amenities like public transport. Street harassment impeded upon the basic ability and right to participate in public life. It resulted in people limiting their movements – how and when they use public spaces – being wary and distrustful of unknown men, and changing their sartorial choices and corporeal presentation in an attempt to lessen the likelihood that they will be targeted. As one person in my study said:
    "I feel very scared and small, I want to take up less space in the world and not be noticed... It makes me feel like I don't deserve a place in the world, that I'm just here for other people. I feel completely impotent, vulnerable and exposed, like I don't matter at all."
    The world becomes experienced through the weary lens of hyper-vigilance, of never being able to just be. It left some participants feeling like they didn't have a right to exist in public. It is a constant reminder of who public spaces belong to: not you.
    Sometimes these impacts were transitory – the initial shock of being jolted out of internal thought by a crude remark – and passed quickly. Sometimes these effects lingered on for days, months and even years after the event.
    When seen in this light street harassment begins to look a lot more like a part of the routine objectification, oppression and social exclusion of women, LGBTIQ people, people of colour and people living with disabilities. It's not a compliment. It is a form of violence and abuse with serious consequences. It has to stop.
    Find out how you can help put an end to street harassment during International Anti-Street Harassment week.

    http://www.dailylife.com.au/news-and-views/dl-culture/where-is-the-line-between-normal-behaviour-and-harassment-20160413-go5fdk.html