Thursday, March 23, 2017

Cycling Safety Cycling Safely Do cycling helmets save lives? Researchers reject doubters and say fatal injuries greatly reduced 774 ABC MELBOURNE BY STEPHANIE CHALKLEY-RHODEN SEP 22 2016 Victoria’s cycling strategy Focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation” may be Negligent. Cycling Participation Negligence Duty of Care Any Kind of Cycling More Often? Victoria's Cycling Strategy Ride2School and Comment by Pete Dowe



The University of NSW study presented to an injury prevention conference in Finland showed helmets reduced fatal head injuries by about 65 per cent.

"...before and after helmet laws, and we found there was no change in the number of people cycling," 

Dr Jake Olivier
774 ABC 22/9/16


The dogma of the goal to increase cycling participation by 
“making it easier for people to take up riding” or the focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation” 
is that it dictates we must have unsafe cycling or people won’t cycle.
So for instance unsafe helmet-less cycling has been put forward by the 
Freestyle Cycling Campaign as a means of boosting participation.
If one finds the helmet requirement can be deemed too onerous,
one wonders which other cyclists’ responsibilities could not be deemed a prohibitive disincentive
to “making it easier for people to take up riding”? or the focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation” 
a set of Bike lights?
Fundamental road safety measures
such as risk reduction behaviour,
and the responsibility to show a duty of care to one’s own safety as well as to other road users
can also be deemed a disincentive to
“making it easier for people to take up riding” or the focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation” 
The Freestyle Cycling campaign also deems the requirement to wear a helmet a disincentive to cycling participation because it reminds people of the risks of death, truncation of life and serious injury.
Remaining ignorant as to the risks involved in cycling has therefore also been put forward as a 
means of “making it easier for people to take up riding” or the focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation”

Pete Dowe


















Do cycling helmets save lives? Researchers reject doubters and say fatal injuries greatly reduced

774 ABC MELBOURNE BY STEPHANIE CHALKLEY-RHODEN
Sydney Road cyclists
PHOTO 
Sydney Road has one of the highest accident rates for cyclists in Victoria.
SUPPLIED: BICYCLE NETWORK VICTORIA

A new study has put to bed the notion that helmets can make cycling injuries worse or prevent people from riding, researchers say.
The University of NSW study presented to an injury prevention conference in Finland this week showed helmets reduced fatal head injuries by about 65 per cent.
Statistician Jake Olivier presented the findings and told 774 ABC Melbourne's Libbi Gorr the results were overwhelming.
"We collected data from 40 different studies using data from over 64,000 injured cyclists," he said.
"We found that helmet use was associated with about a 50 per cent reduction in head injuries of any severity, about a 70 per cent reduction in serious head injuries and those are usually skull fractures and inter-cranial injury or bleeding in the brain."
There was no association between helmet use and neck injuries, Dr Olivier said.
"Most specialists, we've known for a long time that bicycle helmets are effective. Usually the arguments against come from groups that are on the fringe."

Helmet laws 'don't stop people riding'

Australia and New Zealand are among the few countries in the world with mandatory helmet laws.
Austria has recently introduced mandatory helmet laws for children under 12 and had found there was a significant reduction in head injuries in that age group.

















But the weight of opposition against the laws meant the Austrian Government felt it could not enforce helmet wearing for adults.
Many who argue against the laws say helmets prevented people from cycling, particularly commuters.
Dr Olivier said there was no credence to the idea.
"We published a study right before this one in the Medical Journal of Australia where we looked back at some really good high-quality studies ... before and after helmet laws, and we found there was no change in the number of people cycling," he said.



http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-22/cycling-helmets-save-lives-researchers-say/7867904?pfmredir=sm

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Cycling Safety Cycling Safely Victoria's Cycling Strategy Bicycle Network Victoria blames unsafe cycling behaviour problem on increased cycling participation and inadequate cycling infrastructure Melbourne cyclists turn on each other as bike lanes become congested Herald Sun February 23, 2016 “Cyclists are much more likely to Die from Bicycle Alone Accidents/ Bike Falls and Riding on the Footpath onto the Road or Crossing than Dooring” Pete Dowe Cycling Deaths Fatalities Risk Reduction Informed Choice Inadequate Cycling Infrastructure Victoria's Cycling Strategy Focus on Increasing/ Encouraging Cycling Participation may be Negligent“ Cyclists who break the Law are much more likely to be killed or seriously injured” Bicycle Network Victoria "Young people are being killed riding off the footpath onto the road" Bicycle Network Victoria Ride2School Ride2Work



“Cyclists who break the law are much more likely to be killed or seriously injured”

Bicycle Victoria’s Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria (2002).



In fact Bicycle Network Victoria has blamed the unsafe cycling behaviour problem on the increase in cycling participation and inadequate cycling infrastructure.

Bicycle Network CEO Craig Richards said a morning-peak ride to work in Melbourne now felt “like a packed crowd at the MCG”.
“To some extent we have become a victim of our own success. The huge increase in riding is outstripping the provision of decent facilities by the State Government and councils,” he said.

“The crush is getting so bad in some places that riders are starting to get stroppy because there is just not enough space to ride safely.

“Riders like to use their trips to unwind and leave the troubles of the world behind, but the overcrowding of bike lanes is putting everyone on edge.”

The popularity of the bike lanes has led to cycle rage, with faster riders infuriated at being unable to overtake slower cyclists, and some riders forced to swerve into traffic resulting in crashes and near-misses.

 Some women report feeling too intimidated to ride.

Herald Sun Feb 23rd 2016

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/melbourne-cyclists-turn-on-each-other-as-bike-lanes-become-congested/news-story/2854a75fae9c305f64915136f210a747?sv=2602a8075d62af1b4b62fd182d3b95de&login=1

"The fact so many new riders were taking to the roads meant there were a big group of "newbie" cyclists who had yet to learn the best way to conduct themselves on the roads,”
"the fact infrastructure in Melbourne had not kept up with the huge increase in cycling numbers was a factor in tensions between cyclists and motorists."
Gary Brennan
Bicycle Network Victoria 

Herald Sun February 13, 2013

-           
-          Why then ought the “Victorian Government Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources seek to “make it easier for people to take up riding” or focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation”
-          without first giving citizens an informed choice as to the risks involved and risk reduction behaviour,
-          without addressing cyclists’ behaviour modification
-          and without providing adequate cycling infrastructure?

I argue that the Victorian Government
Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources policy of “making it easier for people to take up riding” or its focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation” without first addressing cyclists’ behaviour modification and inadequate cycling infrastructure
“may be found to be negligent where a failure to take reasonable care results in some injury or loss.”


“Cyclists who break the law are much more likely to be killed or seriously injured”
Bicycle Victoria’s Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria (2002).  

Cycling behaviour modification is best addressed off road before people take up cycling.
If cycling is to be a serious form of transport and I argue cycling should be a serious form of transport then the Victorian Government Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources, the Victorian Cycling Community and Victoria’s Cycling Strategy must take Cyclists’ responsibilities seriously.

Pete Dowe
Road Safety Advocate



Melbourne cyclists turn on each other as bike lanes become congested
February 23, 2016 12:07am
ALEKS DEVICTRANSPORT REPORTERHerald Sun
 


Cyclists in Carlton. Picture: Jason Edwards
CYCLISTS have started turning on each other as they fight for space in the city’s increasingly congested bike lanes.
Victoria’s peak cycling lobby group says the solution is to upgrade key routes.
The City of Melbourne denies a problem, saying some lines have already been widened to cater for growth.
Are Melbourne cyclists getting angrier? Scroll down to have your say
Slower bicycle commuters say they are copping the brunt from speedsters who see ride to work as a race, while motorists continue to fume at riders hogging road space.
Bicycles now comprise nearly 17 per cent of vehicles travelling into the CBD between 7am and 10am, and the figure is tipped to jump to 25 per cent by 2020, City of Melbourne research shows.
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The popularity of the bike lanes has led to cycle rage, with faster riders infuriated at being unable to overtake slower cyclists, and some riders forced to swerve into traffic resulting in crashes and near-misses.
Some women report feeling too intimidated to ride.
Bicycle Network CEO Craig Richards said a morning-peak ride to work in Melbourne now felt “like a packed crowd at the MCG”.
“To some extent we have become a victim of our own success. The huge increase in riding is outstripping the provision of decent facilities by the State Government and councils,” he said.
“The crush is getting so bad in some places that riders are starting to get stroppy because there is just not enough space to ride safely.
“Riders like to use their trips to unwind and leave the troubles of the world behind, but the overcrowding of bike lanes is putting everyone on edge.”
City of Melbourne spokesman Carlos Ibarra said the council was not aware of any tension between cyclists but acknowledged riders “were mindful of space” in the morning peak.
“We continue to improve the number, quality, safety and width of bike lanes and paths to encourage more people to ride into the city,” he said.
Mr Ibarra said cyclists were provided with several route options to spread volumes.
In a bid to ease the squeeze, kerbside separated bike lanes were installed on Swanston Street, La Trobe Street, St Kilda Road, Albert Street and Elizabeth Street, the dedicated bike lane on Princes Bridge.
Painted chevron separators on each side of the bike lane were also placed on existing bike lanes to boost separation between the bike lane and cars and allowing cyclists to overtake slower cyclists.
Mr Richards nominated St Kilda Road as a hot spot where riders felt most “aggravated” because the lanes were too narrow, there were too many parked cars, and the intersections could not cater for bikes when it was a red light.
aleks.devic@news.com.au
@AleksDevic

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/melbourne-cyclists-turn-on-each-other-as-bike-lanes-become-congested/news-story/2854a75fae9c305f64915136f210a747?sv=2602a8075d62af1b4b62fd182d3b95de&login=1





Thursday, March 16, 2017

Cycling Safety Cycling Safely Cycling Participation "Why should the Victorian Government seek to increase Cycling Participation without first providing adequate cycling infrastructure?" Comment by Pete Dowe Victoria’s cycling strategy Focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation” may be Negligent. Cycling Participation Negligence Duty of Care Any Kind of Cycling More Often? Victoria's Cycling Strategy Ride2School



Unsafe helmet-less cycling has been put forward to boost cycling participation

A University of NSW study showed helmets reduced fatal head injuries by about 65 per cent."...before and after helmet laws, and we found there was no change in the number of people cycling," Dr Jake Olivier
774 ABC 22/9/16

The dogma of the goal to increase cycling participation is that it dictates we must have unsafe cycling or people won’t cycle.

Health and fitness is undermined where exercise is unsafe.

In fact Bicycle Network Victoria has blamed unsafe cycling on the increase in cycling participation and inadequate cycling infrastructure.

“To some extent we have become a victim of our own success. The huge increase in riding is outstripping the provision of decent facilities by the State Government and councils,”

Some women report feeling too intimidated to ride.

Bicycle Network CEO Craig Richards
Herald Sun Feb 23rd 2016

"the fact infrastructure in Melbourne had not kept up with the huge increase in cycling numbers was a factor in tensions between cyclists and motorists."
Gary Brennan
Bicycle Network Victoria
Herald Sun February 13, 2013


Why then ought the Victorian Government seek to increase cycling participation without first providing adequate cycling infrastructure?

Pete Dowe

Saturday, March 11, 2017

Cycling Safety Cycling Safely Bike Lights Alert END Daylight Saving Sunday, April 2nd 2017 Melbourne, Victoria "Time shift alert on visibility" Stonnington Leader and Bike Lights Law Road Rule 259 Community Safety Victoria’s Cycling Strategy Risk Reduction Informed Choice




END Daylight Saving Sunday, April 2nd 2017 Melbourne, Victoria





Cyclist Joe Astbury, who takes all the safety precautions, said it was usually hardest to see cyclists at dusk and dawn.

“That is the most dangerous time,” Mr Astbury said. “It is not light and it is not dark.”


\

Time shift alert on visibility


Cyclist Joe Astbury. Picture: N40MC301 newsphotos.com.au
Cyclist Joe Astbury. Picture: N40MC301 newsphotos.com.au
THE end of daylight saving on Sunday has prompted a warning for cyclists to ensure they are visible on our roads.
RoadSafe Inner South East chairman Sen-Sgt Hans Harms said cyclists could reduce the risk of accidents by buying good-quality lights, bells and high-visibility clothing.
“Drivers can assist cyclists by checking and checking again to ensure that there are no cyclists nearby, particularly on roads with bicycle lanes,” Sen-Sgt Harms said.
Cyclist Joe Astbury, who takes all the safety precautions, said it was usually hardest to see cyclists at dusk and dawn.
“That is the most dangerous time,” Mr Astbury said. “It is not light and it is not dark.”
Road safety advocate Pete Dowe said a cyclist without lights could easily go unnoticed by a motorist. “You’d be mad to not have a set of bike lights in Melbourne with its ‘four seasons in one day’ causing reduced visibility at any given time,” Mr Dowe said.

Unlit Cyclists Face Greater Injury The Age
Nb "Vicroads describes the law as the minimum safety standard."


Pete Dowe



Please note that the Bike Lights Law 

Road Rule 259 

applies to reduced visibility
not just dark

Bike Lights Law

Road Rule 259

The rider of a bicycle must not ride at night, or in hazardous weather conditions 

causing reduced visibility, 

unless the bicycle, or the rider,
displays—

(a) a flashing or steady white light 

that is clearly visible for at least
200 metres from the front of the bicycle; and

(b) a flashing or steady red light 

that is clearly visible for at least
200 metres from the rear of the bicycle; and

(c) a red reflector 

that is clearly visible for at least 50 metres
from the rear of the bicycle

when light is projected onto it by a vehicle’s headlight on low-beam






http://petedoweroadsafetyadvocate.blogspot.com.au/2012/09/bike-lights-law-road-rule-259.html



Cycling Safety Cycling Safely Bike Lights Alert END Daylight Saving Sunday, April 2nd 2017 Melbourne, Victoria CHOICE Magazine What Bike Lights to Buy? & 'Bike Lights Law' Road Rule 259 Community Safety Victoria's Cycling Strategy Risk Reduction Informed Choice



END Daylight Saving Sunday, April 2nd 2017 Melbourne, Victoria






Cyclist Joe Astbury, who takes all the safety precautions, said it was usually hardest to see 

cyclists at dusk and dawn.


“That is the most dangerous time,” Mr Astbury said. “It is not light and it is not dark.”



Bike lights review
We've tested 45 new bike lights, including models from Cateye, NiteRider and Lezyne.
https://images-blogger-opensocial.googleusercontent.com/gadgets/proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.choice.com.au%2Fimg%2Fbanner_AB-testing_v2.jpg&container=blogger&gadget=a&rewriteMime=image%2F*
·         Article
·         Your say - 38 comments
·         Updated:1 May 2013
   
·         Author:Rebecca Ciaramidaro
  
 100
 34.3K

01.Introduction


Here you'll find test results for 70 bike lights (26 compact rear lights, 32 compact front lights and 12 high-powered front lights), priced from $15 to $320. 
We reveal which bike lights are the:
·         Most visible
·         Most durable
·         Easiest to use, fit and remove.
On this page, you'll find:
·         What's the law?
·         Brands and models tested
·         How we test
We find that bike lights are getting brighter every year. Most of the lights on test are USB rechargeable, which means you don’t need to replace or charge removable batteries. This generally results in a shorter battery life, but lights are easier to remove and charge regularly.
CHOICE's experts independently test a wide range of products and services to bring you unbiased reviews, product comparison tools and buying advice that is trusted by 160,000+ members.
Get access to all
CHOICE benefits.
$7.98
/month
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*Billed quarterly as $23.95

What's the law?

When you ride your bicycle at night or in low-visibility conditions, such as fog or heavy rain, the Australian Road Rules(which form the basis of state and territory laws) require that you have:
·         A white light at the front
·         A red light at rear
·         A red rear reflector.
The lights whether steady or flashing must be visible for at least 200m. Ideally, they should also be visible 50m from the side. The red rear reflector should be visible from 50m from the rear when light is projected onto it by a vehicle’s headlight at low beam. 

Brands and models tested

Compact rear lights

·         BBB BLS-Highlaser
·         BBB Spark rear
·         # Blackburn Super Flea rear
·         # Cateye Rapid 3
·         Cateye Rapid 5
·         # ES Beacon
·         # ES Flare
·         Knog Blinder rear
·         # Knog Blinder 1 rear
·         # Knog Blinder 4V rear
·         # Lezyne Micro Drive rear
·         # Lezyne Femto Drive rear
·         # Light and motion Vis 180
·         # Moon Comet rear
·         Moon Shield
·         Niteflux Red Zone 4
·         # NiteRider Solas 2W
·         # Owleye HighLux 5 rear
·         # Portland Design Works Danger Zone
·         Serfas Raider rear USL-5R
·         # Serfas Seat Stay Taillight
·         # Serfas Thunderbolt rear
·         Skully 1W Rear
·         S-Sun Eaglefly
·         # Tioga Alien rear
·         Tioga Dual Eyes USB

Compact front lights

·         BBB Spark front
·         Blackburn Flea 2.0 USB front
·         # Blackburn Scorch
·         # Blackburn Super Flea front
·         # Cateye Nano Shot
·         # Cygo-Lite Metro 300
·         # ES Gamma Ray
·         Ilumenox Highpower SS-L1222W
·         Ilumenox Vega 1W
·         # Ilumenox Vega 3w
·         Knog Blinder front
·         # Knog Blinder 1 front
·         Knog Boomer USB front
·         Knog Gekko bracket-less
·         # Lezyne Femto Drive Front
·         # Lezyne Macro Drive front
·         # Lezyne Micro Drive front
·         # Moon Comet front
·         Moon Mask
·         # Moon Meteor
·         # NiteRider Mako 200
·         # Owleye Highlux 30
·         # Owleye Highlux 5 front
·         # Owleye Solar Highbred 40
·         Planet Bike Beamer 5
·         Portland Design Works Dreadnought
·         Serfas Raider USL-5
·         # Serfas Thunderbolt front
·         # Skully K2
·         # Tioga Alien front
·         Tioga ET front
·         # Tioga Super Light

High-powered front lights

·         Ay-Up V Twin Sport
·         # Cateye Nano Shot+
·         # Cygo-Lite Expilion 700
·         # Cygo-Lite Metro 420
·         Exposure Lights Joystick
·         # Lezyne Mini Drive
·         # Lezyne Power Drive
·         # Light and motion Urban 400
·         # Light and motion Urban 550
·         Moon Power 500 front
·         # NiteRider Lumina 350
·         Serfas TL 500
# Newly tested models

How we test

A range of bike lights have been reviewed by Bicycle Network Victoria and a panel of industry experts in line with the Australian Road Rules. The tests and overall scores are made up of the following: 
·         Function and quality (80%): The lights are assessed for their effective visibility at night on a suburban road with a popular cycle path, at a distance of 200m, and also at 50m with the lights angled at 45 degrees (to simulate the bike approaching an intersection). The flash rate, where applicable, is also assessed. The industrial design ratings (durability, weather resistance and useability) are conducted by the team at RMIT Industrial Design.
·         Price (10%): Is the price appropriate to the quality and category of the light?
·         Appearance (10%): Is the light visually appealing?

Changes since the 2012 lights test

Last year Ride On magazine joined forces with RMIT to measure the brightness of bike lights using a lux meter. The results were conflicting. For example, the brightest compact front light was rated eighth out of 11 lights. As a result Ride Ondecided that humans determine how good a light is at making you visible and as such this assessment using the lux meter is no longer included in the test.

This year Ride On has revised its rating system, so results for previously tested models have been adjusted accordingly. Dynamo lights haven’t been included in this test; however, they’ll be tested separately on new testing equipment that Ride On is currently developing.
Find out more about bikes and bike accessories.


Please note that the Bike Lights Law 

Road Rule 259 

applies to reduced visibility
not just dark

Bike Lights Law

Road Rule 259

The rider of a bicycle must not ride at night, or in hazardous weather conditions 

causing reduced visibility, 

unless the bicycle, or the rider,
displays—

(a) a flashing or steady white light 

that is clearly visible for at least
200 metres from the front of the bicycle; and

(b) a flashing or steady red light 

that is clearly visible for at least
200 metres from the rear of the bicycle; and

(c) a red reflector 

that is clearly visible for at least 50 metres
from the rear of the bicycle

when light is projected onto it by a vehicle’s headlight on low-beam

                    Nb "Vicroads describes the law as the minimum safety standard."

                             Pete Dowe