Monday, July 6, 2015

Cycling Deaths Fatalities Cycling Safety Cycling Safely Report to VicRoads recommends "cyclists be blameless in any crash with a driver" Herald Sun June 25th 2015 "Making it easier for Cyclists to get killed or seriously injured" Cycling Participation Negligence Public Liability Civil Liability


“Our review of cycling deaths shows that cyclists who break the law 

are much more likely to be killed or seriously injured.”



Bicycle Victoria's Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria 2002



“Cyclists who break the law are doing themselves and other cyclists no favours 

with their behaviour.” 


Bicycle Victoria as previously stated on its website



Should cycling safety be about blame?

or responsibility for a cyclist's own safety and reducing the risk of road trauma?

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (2006) found that cyclists were responsible for a majority (60%) of fatal cycle crashes.

Being deemed "technically blame-less" in a fatal collision

doesn't bring a cyclist back from the dead!


Pete Dowe
Road Safety Advocate




"In over 60 per cent of (fatal) crashes, the cyclist was deemed to be ‘responsible’ for the
action that precipitated the fatal crash.

This was particularly the case in crashes at intersections where the cyclist was either riding through the intersection on the road or moving from the footway onto the intersection. 

Cyclists were also found to be primarily responsible in other crashes where the cyclist moved from the footway to the road." 


Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) 2006

http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/roads/safety/publications/2006/pdf/death_cyclists_road.pdf
 



Report to VicRoads recommends cyclists be blameless in any crash with a driver

Cars, bikes: Keeping the peace on the road

Cars, bikes: Keeping the peace on the road
CYCLISTS should be blameless in any crash involving drivers, an independent report into overhauling Victoria’s road rules recommends.
It was also suggested police be given powers to issue on-the-spot fines to cyclists who ride while talking on their mobile phone and riders not in single file on windy and narrow roads.
A host of changes to road rules has been recommended to VicRoads as part of the wideranging cycling road rules review it commissioned.
CYCLIST’S VIEW: MOTORISTS THINK THEY OWN THE ROAD




DRIVER’S VIEW: CYCLISTS MAKE LIFE HELL ON EARTHAmong proposed changes are laws allowing cyclists to ride in bus lanes, permitting riders of any age to ride on a footpath if with a child under 12 years old and making it easier to stage a cycling event.But a change requiring drivers to leave at least 1m when passing cyclists will not be considered.
The report found there would be strong opposition to any law requiring cyclists to ride s
The report found there would be strong opposition to any law requiring cyclists to ride single file.
In a bid to address the ongoing road war between motorists and riders, it was recommended an education campaign start alerting drivers and riders to use horns only when needed and motorists to be mindful when opening their car door.
One change would allow cyclists to ride on footpaths with children
Councils surveyed urged Victoria should follow in the footsteps of the Netherlands and introduce “strict liability” where drivers are automatically at fault if they collide with a cyclist.
What do you think? Have your say below.
Council officers also suggested riders being allowed to ride through pedestrian crossing without having to dismount and raising the prospect of permitting riders to turn left at red lights.
These council reforms did not form part of the final recommendations.
There were 10,450 people and most, especially bike riders, did not view cycling as safe in Victoria, citing drivers’ negative attitudes towards cyclists, lack of riding infrastructure, fears of car doorings and problems with road design.
“Participants agreed there are significant barriers to bicycle riding in Victoria. The main barriers were thought to be the lack of respect shown to bicycle riders and the lack of bicycle riding infrastructure,” the report said.
Cyclists talking on mobile phones is illegal but riders can only be taken to court and penalised, making it difficult for police to enforce the law.
It would bring consistency when enforcing the law for drivers and riders.
It is also suggested that when motorists are turning left, they be required to give way to cyclists who had a green bicycle crossing light.
The report found strong opposition to introducing licensing and registration for bicycles, and there would be heavy “resistance” if any laws changed requiring cyclists to ride single file.
Data contained in the report shows between 2004 and 2013 there were 29,181 cycling-related crashes with 84 people killed and 4447 receiving serious injuries.
aleks.devic@news.com.au
Twitter: @AleksDevic
Cyclists who talk on phones while riding may soon face on-the-spot fines.
Cyclists who talk on phones while riding may soon face on-the-spot fines. 


http://m.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/report-to-vicroads-recommends-cyclists-be-blameless-in-any-crash-with-a-driver/story-fni0fit3-1227413057481

Community Safety Family Violence Royal Commission into Family Violence "Fighting Against Abuse" Herald Sun June 30th 2015









Herald Sun June 30th 2015