Friday, September 23, 2016

Cycling Safety Cycling Safely Do cycling helmets save lives? Researchers reject doubters and say fatal injuries greatly reduced 774 ABC MELBOURNE BY STEPHANIE CHALKLEY-RHODEN SEP 22 2016 Victoria’s cycling strategy Focus on encouraging/ increasing cycling “participation” may be Negligent. Cycling Participation Negligence Duty of Care Any Kind of Cycling More Often? Victoria's Cycling Strategy Ride2School


The University of NSW study presented to an injury prevention conference in Finland this week showed helmets reduced fatal head injuries by about 65 per cent.

"...before and after helmet laws, and we found there was no change in the number of people cycling," he said.





Do cycling helmets save lives? Researchers reject doubters and say fatal injuries greatly reduced

774 ABC MELBOURNE BY STEPHANIE CHALKLEY-RHODEN
Sydney Road cyclists
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Sydney Road has one of the highest accident rates for cyclists in Victoria.
SUPPLIED: BICYCLE NETWORK VICTORIA

A new study has put to bed the notion that helmets can make cycling injuries worse or prevent people from riding, researchers say.
The University of NSW study presented to an injury prevention conference in Finland this week showed helmets reduced fatal head injuries by about 65 per cent.
Statistician Jake Olivier presented the findings and told 774 ABC Melbourne's Libbi Gorr the results were overwhelming.
"We collected data from 40 different studies using data from over 64,000 injured cyclists," he said.
"We found that helmet use was associated with about a 50 per cent reduction in head injuries of any severity, about a 70 per cent reduction in serious head injuries and those are usually skull fractures and inter-cranial injury or bleeding in the brain."
There was no association between helmet use and neck injuries, Dr Olivier said.
"Most specialists, we've known for a long time that bicycle helmets are effective. Usually the arguments against come from groups that are on the fringe."

Helmet laws 'don't stop people riding'

Australia and New Zealand are among the few countries in the world with mandatory helmet laws.
Austria has recently introduced mandatory helmet laws for children under 12 and had found there was a significant reduction in head injuries in that age group.





But the weight of opposition against the laws meant the Austrian Government felt it could not enforce helmet wearing for adults.
Many who argue against the laws say helmets prevented people from cycling, particularly commuters.
Dr Olivier said there was no credence to the idea.
"We published a study right before this one in the Medical Journal of Australia where we looked back at some really good high-quality studies ... before and after helmet laws, and we found there was no change in the number of people cycling," he said.



http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-22/cycling-helmets-save-lives-researchers-say/7867904?pfmredir=sm

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Community Safety Gender Equality "Why I'll never date a feminist" By Dave Hon http://www.newspressnow.com/josephine Sep 5, 2016



Why I'll never date a feminist

If you look for a reason to hate men, chances are you’re going to find it.
The truth is, I don’t blame women, (especially in my generation) for hating men. They’ve been told there’s a wage gap (I disagree). That there’s a culture of rape on college campuses (I also disagree). And the patriarchy is keeping them oppressed in almost every facet of their lives (I reallyreally disagree.)
Political issues have been creeping into the bedroom. Now, they’re in romance. Because of the hateful culture, men are now demanding "consent texts" on campus before engaging in raunchy, post-party one night stands. Men’s Rights Activists have taken flight with a new philosophy called "Red Pill" which aims to point out how derogatory, hypocritical and vindictive third-wave feminists can be.
No doubt, there are men who should be buried underneath the prison. There’s plenty of examples of how the justice system has failed victims. But, it also fails men. The Father’s Rights Movement reports that only 14 percent of custodial parents are fathers. Mothers are more likely to be awarded child support. Women are more likely to graduate college, they live longer, are less likely to die in the workplace, less likely to go to prison and extremely less likely to die in war-time combat.
When it comes to dating, I don’t care about any of that. Unless you do.
I used to think dating across the political aisle was not only possible, but practical. Hell, if James Carville and Mary Matalin can get along, I can date someone who thinks my genitals automatically give me privileges that they don’t have, right?
Wrong.
People who are more loyal to their gender and not their significant other don’t make good partners. They will always look at you as inherently more fortunate than them. They’ve bought into the “battle of the sexes” mentality and it often pervades their perceptions of romance. Romance turns into a power struggle rather than a partnership.
There are complex advantages and disadvantages to being a man or a woman in America. No doubt, men enjoy privileges that women don’t but that boat goes both ways.
The truth is, these aren’t political issues, but deeply personal ones. Often times, anti-male or anti-female rhetoric is rooted in a previous bad experience. They’re cultural opinions that reflect our world views, and thusly, affect how we want to raise our families. Now that America is more politically divided than ever, it’s impossible to date someone with staunchly different ideals than you.
It’s a shame, really, that this divide is widening between the sexes. It’s evident that gender politics is hurting our culture. More marriages are failing and women are reporting that they’re unhappier now than ever.
Perhaps in several decades this won’t be the case. Maybe one day, men and women will stop trying to eliminate the lines between us and realize it’s the differences between the sexes that make romance, family and love an enjoyable experience.

Dave Hon can be reached at david.hon@newspressnow.com. Follow him on Twitter: @WilhelmW0lfgang.



Community Safety Female Aggression Domestic Violence Family Violence UK BULLY WIVES TRIPLE Domestic violence against men soars to record levels as number of cases treble in past decade Number of wives and girlfriends convicted of assaulting partners reaches new high The Sun UK Sept 17th 2016


DOMESTIC violence against men has trebled in the past decade, shocking official figures reveal.
A record 5,640 wives and girlfriends were convicted of assaulting their male partners last year — up from 1,850 in 2007.






BULLY WIVES TRIPLE 

Domestic violence against men soars to record levels as number of cases treble in past decade

Number of wives and girlfriends convicted of assaulting partners reaches new high

DOMESTIC violence against men has trebled in the past decade, shocking official figures reveal.
A record 5,640 wives and girlfriends were convicted of assaulting their male partners last year — up from 1,850 in 2007.



Domestic violence in the home
GETTY IMAGES
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Domestic violence against men has reach record highs

The issue has become a taboo because victims are often too ashamed to talk about their experiences.
But an MP is now calling for action after evidence emerged the problem is growing at an alarming rate.
Stats released by the Attorney General show 177 women are convicted of domestic abuse EVERY WEEK.



Sir Philip Craven
PA:PRESS ASSOCIATION
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Tory MP Philip Davies says we must not forget male victims

They show 1,850 women were convicted of domestic violence in 2007 but last year the total dealt with by the courts had risen to 5,640.
Crown Prosecutors insist any form of domestic violence is serious and there is no bias or lack of concern when dealing with male victims.
Tory MP Philip Davies, who uncovered the stats, said: “When people think of domestic violence, they automatically think of men abusing women.
“But the vast increase in the number of women convicted of domestic violence over the past decade must not be overlooked.
“We must not forget the male victims.
“Both male and female perpetrators of domestic violence should be dealt with equally harshly by the courts and more should be done to help victims of domestic violence whether they are men or women.”
More than 52,000 women have been prosecuted for assaulting their partners since 2006, the figures show.
But organisations that offer help to male victims are sparse.
There are fewer than 100 beds in 20 refuges or safe houses for male victims in the UK, compared with 7,500 for women.
One male victim of domestic abuse told The Sun on Sunday that when he was attacked by his girlfriend it was assumed that he was the abuser.
Speaking on the condition of anonymity, he said: “Fairly early on in our relationship I realised my girlfriend had anger management problems and could get violent.
“She told me that she had been physically abused by her father.
“I suggested that she went and got help but she refused to do so.
“She would often punch or slap me if we had simple disagreements and then would apologise and get very upset.
“It all came to a head one night in a bar when we had both had too much to drink.
“We got into an argument as we were leaving and she punched me in the face several times and broke my nose.
The police were unwilling to help and I eventually dropped charges and ended our relationship
“She began kicking me and I was telling her to clam down and was trying to hold her away from me.
“She was screaming and out of control.
“Two guys came out of the pub and began attacking me.
“I was on the floor telling them that I was the victim but they didn’t stop kicking until she told them that she had hit me.
“After that I told her to get help but she refused so I went to the police.
“The police were unwilling to help and I eventually dropped charges and ended our relationship.”
John Mays, the chairman of the Parity, which campaigns for equal rights for men and women, said: “In 30 to 40 percent of domestic violence cases men are the victims and in many cases the injuries sustained are very severe.
“One of the great tragedies of male victim domestic violence is that there are very few safe houses for men who are seeking refuge with their children while there are over 9,000 for women.
“This is a problem which needs to be urgently addressed.”




https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/1802863/domestic-violence-against-men-soars-to-record-levels-as-number-of-cases-treble-in-past-decade/

Sunday, September 18, 2016

Community Safety Cyberbullying Rumour Spread Vigilantism Smartphones drive latest wave of cyber-bullying SMH June 30th 2012 Bullying at School Fear of Crime HyperVigilantism Histrionic Personality "teased, threatened, spread rumours about or excluded"



"teased, threatened, spread rumours about or excluded"





Smartphones drive latest wave of cyber-bullying

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THE rise of smartphones has outpaced traditional wisdom on how parents should monitor teenagers' use of technology and created a powerful new venue for cyber-bullying, according to an Australian psychologist who has conducted the most detailed study yet of children's behaviour towards each other.
Sheryl Hemphill, from the Australian Catholic University, followed 700 Victorian school students from year 7 to year 9, asking them anonymously whether they had teased, threatened, spread rumours about or excluded other children either in person or using a computer or phone.




Spreading rumours ... smartphones are facilitating cyber-bullying, according to an Australian psychologist.
Spreading rumours ... smartphones are facilitating cyber-bullying, according to an Australian psychologist. Photo: Bloomberg

She found 15 per cent of the teenagers had been involved in cyber-bullying, fewer than the 21 per cent who confessed to having bullied others in person.
But there was little overlap between the groups, with only 7 per cent of students engaged both in face-to-face and cyber-bullying, Professor Hemphill found. She said this might be a result of ''anonymity and the perception that this form of bullying was less likely to be detected. Cyber-bullying may also rely on different forms of power'' related to technology skills rather than physical dominance.
It was also possible, she said, that teenagers might act impulsively online because they were remote from the distress caused by their behaviour. ''In cyberspace you don't have the visual cues,'' she said.
Many authorities, including the federal government's Stay Smart Online initiative recommend parents keep computers in the family room so children's internet activity is visible.
But smartphones had raised the stakes, Professor Hemphill said. ''There have been ideas about how much monitoring parents should do … but now with smartphones they really can't be there all the time.'' A survey by Google last month showed more than half of mobile phones in Australia have internet capability.
In contrast to traditional bullying, Professor Hemphill's survey, published this week in the Journal of Adolescent Health, found cyber-bullying was not linked to disrupted family background or poor school performance.
She hopes to conduct further research into characteristics of individual children or situations, including whether group dynamics affect the likelihood of bullying as online devices become more prevalent. ''What are the peer things that are going on if they're all online at the same time?'' she asks. ''We know peers are really important for adolescents and if you get a group together it could be that they may behave in ways they would never think of on their own.''
An interim report last year by the federal joint select committee on cyber-safety recommended the development of a national definition of bullying via technology and of mentoring to promote online safety.
In its response, in December, the federal government proposed defining bullying as, ''repeated verbal, physical, social or psychological behaviour that is harmful and involves the misuse of power by an individual or group towards one or more persons. Cyberbullying refers to bullying through information and communication technologies.''
But the Stride Foundation, which promotes youth wellbeing, suggested in a submission to the inquiry that the threshold should be lower for cyber-bullying. ''Because the intimidation or bullying action is delivered via the written word … the target can read and therefore be affected by the same words again and again'' even if the attack occurred only once, it said.


http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/mobiles/smartphones-drive-latest-wave-of-cyberbullying-20120629-21809.html

Community Safety Conviction: How police caught Jill Meagher's killer The Age SEPTEMBER 16 2016 "Many on #socialmedia were quick to blame Tom, for if it was him then it was not the type of random crime that left other women at risk." #cyberbullying Rumour Spread HyperVigilantism Fear of Crime Due Process Histrionic Personality



"Many on #socialmedia were quick to blame Tom, for if it was him then it was not the type of random crime that left other women at risk." #cyberbullying






Conviction: How police caught Jill Meagher's killer

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You know them by sight but not necessarily by name – the grim-faced homicide detectives you see on the evening news brushing past the crime tape as they enter a murder scene.
They wear dark suits and carry bound folders they use to record observations, and if they talk to the waiting media the remarks will be well-practised cliches designed to provide a reassuring sound bite without hinting at the likely direction of the investigation.


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Conviction - Finding Jill

Supplied trailer for Conviction program
Inevitably they will talk of the "brutal" murder, the "devastated" family, the need to keep an open mind and how they are waiting on forensic tests.
If in the weeks that follow they provide a greater insight, it will be to flush out witnesses in what will be a protracted investigation. If they silently bunker down, it is a fair bet they are expecting an early arrest. For the rule is, the more homicide detectives says publicly the less they know privately.
When they have success in a tough one there will be a post-conviction celebration, usually an investigators' lunch at an inner-suburban pub. Which means the inner workings of a homicide investigation remain secret detectives' business.
And so when award-winning documentary producer Terry Carlyon approached police more than 20 months ago to delve inside the investigation into the 2012 murder of ABC staffer Jill Meagher by serial rapist Adrian Bayley as she walked home from a Brunswick pub, there were concerns.
Eventually police agreed to co-operate with Carlyon on his latest project, Conviction, but it was by no means a unanimous decision. Some felt telling the story might give away investigative secrets that would assist future suspects but the majority view was, as Jill's case created such angst in the community, the full story should be told.
Terry enlisted me as the interviewer and narrator, and what became clear to us very quickly was that the police involved wanted to tell their story.


Murderer Adrian Ernest Bayley's arrogance during the police interview turned to sobs at his bleak future.
Murderer Adrian Ernest Bayley's arrogance during the police interview turned to sobs at his bleak future.  Photo: Jason South

No longer did they speak in sound grabs and cliches. No longer were they just stern-faced men in dark suits. On camera we see their emotional and physical commitment and learn of the long-term personal consequences.
As veteran investigator Detective Senior Sergeant Ron Iddles says, "Some people talk about that job as like throwing a hand grenade into the crew".


Jill Meagher was a "blameless" victim, grabbed randomly just walking down the street on September 22, 2012.
Jill Meagher was a "blameless" victim, grabbed randomly just walking down the street on September 22, 2012. 

We learnt that while homicide detectives are all different, they have one thing in common – a great sense of empathy.
They are the only ones who immerse themselves in the case from beginning to end – culminating, they hope, with a Supreme Court conviction. And they are the ones who bond with the victim's family, who see these detectives as their only hope for justice.


The case of the woman who disappeared on her way home from Friday drinks created great angst in the community.
The case of the woman who disappeared on her way home from Friday drinks created great angst in the community. Photo: Scott Barbour

Jill had been for Friday night drinks with friends and was walking the few hundred metres home when she was approached and followed along Sydney Road by Bayley, who then raped and murdered her in a nearby laneway.
Bayley should have been in jail, as his parole should have been revoked when he pleaded guilty to a serious assault in Geelong. Inexplicably he was freed when he appealed against the severity of sentence.


Veteran homicide investigator Ron Iddles talks about the Jill Meagher murder in the ABC documentary, Conviction.
Veteran homicide investigator Ron Iddles talks about the Jill Meagher murder in the ABC documentary, Conviction. Photo: Supplied

The Meagher murder shocked, fascinated and outraged a large section of the community as few other crimes have done. So why were so many strangers so moved by this particular murder?
First, while we would like to think all lives are equal in our eyes, they are not. Jill was young, pretty, smart, had a good job and a nice husband, and so many saw her life as more important and her death more tragic.


At first police attention fell on Jill Meagher's husband, Tom, but he was quickly eliminated as a suspect.
At first police attention fell on Jill Meagher's husband, Tom, but he was quickly eliminated as a suspect. Photo: Penny Stephens

Second, it was a mystery as initially she was a missing person with no one, other than Bayley, knowing what happened after she left the pub.
And finally she was a "blameless" victim, grabbed randomly as she was, just walking down the street. If it happened to her, then it could happen to us.


Meagher murder investigators Paul Rowe (left) and Dave Butler, from the ABC documentary Conviction.
Meagher murder investigators Paul Rowe (left) and Dave Butler, from the ABC documentary Conviction. Photo: Supplied

The initial suspected missing persons case quickly turned into a probable murder investigation under the command of Acting Detective Senior Sergeant Dave Butler of Homicide Crew Four.
It took just six days from the time of Jill's disappearance to her killer being charged (by fluke the documentary airs on the fourth anniversary of Bayley's arrest), but the impact on police was profound with two members of the forensic team so affected by post-traumatic stress they have not returned to work.


Paul Rowe (left) interviewed the suspects while Dave Butler led the murder investigation, which took six days to solve.
Paul Rowe (left) interviewed the suspects while Dave Butler led the murder investigation, which took six days to solve.  Photo: Supplied

From the moment the case went public the interest was extraordinary, with widespread speculation via social media.
As the then head of the homicide squad, now retired inspector, John Potter, told Conviction: "There was no doubt that the teams were under pressure. This wasn't any other job."


Paul Rowe (left) and Dave Butler typify the public's idea of homicide squad detectives, carrying bound folders and ...
Paul Rowe (left) and Dave Butler typify the public's idea of homicide squad detectives, carrying bound folders and wearing darks suits. Photo: Supplied

Butler looked at the circumstances and quickly concluded the chances of finding Jill alive were slim and immediately (and logically) concentrated on her husband, Tom.
Many on social media were quick to blame Tom, for if it was him then it was not the type of random crime that left other women at risk.
It is a brutal business treating a distressed and confused man, who is coming to the awful realisation he has lost his wife, as a possible murderer.
Butler recalls: "When she didn't appear on the Monday, it really crystallised for me and I formed the strong view that she was probably dead.
"We were able to eliminate Tom reasonably quickly in this case. And the important thing with that was, let's say we never solved the case, the important thing with that is we can say 'Listen, it's not him, we've proven beyond any doubt that it's not him'."
Tom understood the reasoning and was full of praise for the work of the homicide squad, but in some ways Butler remains more bruised by the questioning.
"It was necessary to do but when you think about it down the track, you're left thinking 'Jeez, we were pretty awful, for the way we've treated this poor guy. Not only has he lost his wife but now he's been treated pretty badly by us in some respects'," he says.
We are taken step by step on how Bayley, a convicted violent sex offender, moved from a name in a file, to a person of interest, to the main suspect, and finally the convicted offender.
With no body, no murder weapon and no witnesses the interview with Bayley would be crucial, and while detectives would have liked more time to plan the questioning they were forced to move because of concerns he could destroy evidence or strike again.
The homicide interview has moved a long way from third-degree intimidation and good cop/bad cop tactics. Now it is a conversation based on persuasion where the suspect is led to the conclusion that telling the truth is the only option.
In this case, the quietly spoken and deep-thinking Acting Detective Sergeant Paul Rowe was chosen to question Bayley, a hard, arrogant veteran of police interviews who would not give ground easily.
Crowded in the adjoining monitoring room were senior police desperate for a breakthrough, with everyone knowing this would be a long night.
Sitting in a caravan more than 100 kilometres away connected by phone was the head of crew, Ron Iddles, who was on several days' leave. He was confident Rowe was the man for the job.
Rowe says of Bayley, "He's a very confident person, to the extent that he was quite relaxed initially. I think he was fairly comfortable in the fact that he thought he had gotten away with it and that he would get away with it".
Bayley gave a fabricated version of his movements that night, then slowly Rowe introduced evidence that dismantled, brick by brick, Bayley's house of lies.
"Once he realised that well, perhaps there was some evidence that we had that he wasn't giving me, he certainly became uncomfortable. He became rattled; at one point in time he became angry to the point that they sent another police member to stand outside the door."
While the interview continued, police were searching Bayley's home where they found a damaged phone SIM card. Butler says when Rowe was told of the potentially incriminating evidence he said, "If there's a God, please let it be Jill's".
After a tactical intelligence officer had a Vodafone technician check the serial number, Butler says she "burst in through the [monitoring room] door, and screamed out; 'It's Jill's!' "
Acting Senior Sergeant Sharon Darcy remembers the breakthrough moment: "The elation in the room, just everyone was so pleased that we've got this bastard. That was the point where we knew that, yep 100 per cent, he's our man."
Eventually the arrogant Bayley cracked and sobbed, not for his murderous past but his bleak future. He gave a self-serving confession, then took police to Gisborne where they recovered the body. Faced with the overwhelming evidence he pleaded guilty, saving her relatives the trauma of a trial.
Butler says, "We were able to reunite Gillian with the family to give them some closure and allow them to bury her".
And Butler has no doubt what would have happened if they had not found the killer. "In my view had we not caught Adrian Bayley, he wouldn't have stopped and we would be dealing with a serial killer."
Conviction: ABC TV, 8.30pm, Tuesday September 27.

http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/convicted-how-police-caught-jill-meaghers-killer-20160914-grg666.html