Saturday, July 26, 2014

Cycling Negligence Duty of Care "Making it easier for people to take up riding without Bike Lights" Victoria Police intercept 50 cyclists riding without lights after dark. No fines were issued. Moreland City News/ Moreland Leader June 3rd 2013 Community Safety



"Making it easier for people to take up riding without Bike Lights"


I argue that the Department of Justice has a 

“duty of care to ensure that reasonable action is taken to minimise the risk of harm to anyone 

who is reasonably likely to be affected by the department's activities.”

I argue that the Department of Justice

“ may be found to be negligent where a failure to take reasonable care results in some injury or loss.”


I argue that the Department of Justice’s

focus on cyclists’ voluntary compliance with Road Rule 259

"Makes it easier for people to take up riding without Bike Lights"

and is in conflict with the Department of Justice,

Victoria Police Road to Zero Road Toll Campaign.

I argue that it is inappropriate for Victoria Police Law Enforcement Officers

to hand out sets of bike lights to cyclists 

in lieu of a traffic infringement penalty 

and that this affects the safety of all road users.



Pete Dowe 

Road Safety Advocate


"Five cyclists killed in the last two years were riding in poor light conditions without lights or bright clothing." 



Bicycle Victoria's Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria (2002)






Cyclists who break the law are much more likely to be killed or seriously injured

Bicycle Victoria's Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria (2002)






"...Police visited the Upfield Bike Path at Albert Street, Brunswick one evening recently...

50 sets of lights were provided to intercepted bikes riding without lights after dark. No fines were issued..."



Moreland City News/ Moreland Leader June 3rd 2013 











Please note

Road Rule 259 applies to reduced visibility not just dark

Bike Lights Law

Road Rule 259


The rider of a bicycle must not ride at night, or in hazardous weather conditions 
causing reduced visibility, 

unless the bicycle, or the rider,
displays—

(a) a flashing or steady white light 

that is clearly visible for at least
200 metres from the front of the bicycle; and

(b) a flashing or steady red light 

that is clearly visible for at least
200 metres from the rear of the bicycle; and

(c) a red reflector 

that is clearly visible for at least 50 metres
from the rear of the bicycle

when light is projected onto it by a vehicle’s headlight on low-beam



Cycling Negligence Duty of Care “Making it easier for people to take up riding“ Comment by Pete Dowe Community Safety



I argue that the “Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure


"has a duty of care to ensure that reasonable action is taken to minimise the risk of harm to anyone who is reasonably likely to be affected by the department's activities.”


I argue that the Victorian Government Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure

“may be found to be negligent where a failure to take reasonable care results in some injury or loss.”



policy of  “making it easier for people to take up riding” 

may be Negligent.


“Cyclists who break the law are much more likely to be killed or seriously injured”

Bicycle Victoria’s Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria (2002).



Therefore it matters very much how you take up riding.


I argue that “Making it easier for people to take up riding“ 

also “Makes it easier for people to take up riding without a set of bike lights."


Cycling behaviour cannot be a cycling safety issue while the goal is to

“make it easier for people to take up riding”


Cycling behaviour as a cycling safety issue is outside the terms of reference of

“making it easier for people to take up riding”


“make it easier for people to take up riding”

it is then politically incorrect for cycling behaviour to be a cycling safety issue.

Anything can then be deemed a disincentive to “making it easier for people to take up riding”

including fundamental road safety measures:such as risk reduction behaviour,


and the responsibility to show a duty of care to one’s own safety as well as to other road users.

The dogma of the goal to increase cycling participation by 

“making it easier for people to take up riding”

is that it dictates we must have unsafe cycling or people won’t cycle.


So for instance unsafe helmet-less cycling has been put forward by the 

Freestyle Cycling Campaign as a means of boosting participation.


If one finds the helmet requirement can be deemed too onerous,

one wonders which other cyclists’ responsibilities could not be deemed a prohibitive disincentive

to “making it easier for people to take up riding”?

The Freestyle Cycling campaign also deems the requirement to wear a helmet a disincentive to cycling participation 

because it reminds people of the risks of death, truncation of life and serious injury.

Remaining ignorant as to the risks involved in cycling has therefore also been put forward as a 

means of “making it easier for people to take up riding”.


The policy of “making it easier for people to take up riding” rationalises:

“The health benefits of cycling such as a more active lifestyle and better fitness far outweigh 

the risks of death or injury from crashes” 

Bicycle Network Victoria


In other words “don’t worry about it, she’ll be right mate”


This is a cavalier approach to the risk of preventable death, truncation of life and serious injury.


“Cyclists who break the law are much more likely to be killed or seriously injured”

Bicycle Victoria’s Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria (2002).



The policy of “making it easier for people to take up riding”

therefore conflicts with Victoria's Cycling Strategy.


It does not “encourage safe and respectful behaviours from all road users” nor does it

ensure bike riders and other road users have appropriate rights and responsibilities.”


“Making it easier for people to take up riding” is therefore also in conflict

with the Victoria Police “Road to Zero” Road Toll campaign.


“Making it easier for people to take up riding” also conflicts 

with the key objective of the cycling participation policy

which is increased health and fitness and increased life span 

through the reputed benefits of aerobic exercise.


The health and fitness objective is however undermined where the means of aerobic exercise 
is unsafe.



Unsafe travel, unsafe exercise, unsafe cycling behaviour 


which increases the risk of preventable death, truncation of life and serious injury.



I argue “Making it easier for people to take up riding”  

encourages people to participate in road usage 

without an informed choice as to the risks 



and in a manner in which they are unprepared



and ignorant of risk reduction behaviour, which affects the safety of all road users.



I argue  “Making it easier for people to take up riding” 

encourages people to participate in road usage in a manner in which 


they are much more likely to be killed or seriously injured, 


which affects the safety of all road users.



I argue that the Victorian Government

Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure



“may be found to be negligent where a failure to take 

reasonable care results in some injury or loss.”



Pete Dowe
Road Safety Advocate


http://petedoweroadsafetyadvocate.blogspot.com.au/2013/06/cycling-bike-lights-police-intercept-50.html


Cycling Negligence Duty of Care "Making it easier for people to take up riding without Bike Lights" Road Rule 259 Comment by Pete Dowe Community Safety



"Five cyclists killed in the last two years were riding in poor light conditions without lights or bright clothing." 


Bicycle Victoria's Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria (2002)


"...Police visited the Upfield Bike Path at Albert Street, Brunswick one evening recently...

50 sets of lights were provided to intercepted bikes riding without lights after dark. 

No fines were issued..."

Moreland City News/ Moreland Leader June 3rd 2013 


"Cyclists who break the law are much more likely to be killed or seriously injured"

Bicycle Victoria's Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria (2002)




I argue that the Department of Justice’s

focus on cyclists’ voluntary compliance with Road Rule 259

"Makes it easier for people to take up riding without Bike Lights"

and is in conflict with the Department of Justice,

Victoria Police Road to Zero Road Toll Campaign.



I argue that it is inappropriate for Victoria Police Law Enforcement Officers


to hand out sets of bike lights to cyclists 

in lieu of a traffic infringement penalty 

and that this affects the safety of all road users.



I argue that compliance with the road rules is motivated by fear of detection and the 

likelihood of the law being enforced 

and that road rule compliance affects the safety of all road users.

I argue that self-regulation is motivated by the likelihood of the law being enforced.


I argue that the Department of Justice has a 

“duty of care to ensure that reasonable action is taken to minimise the risk of harm to anyone 

who is reasonably likely to be affected by the department's activities.”




I argue that the Department of Justice


“ may be found to be negligent where a failure to take reasonable care results in some injury or loss.”






Pete Dowe 
Road Safety Advocate








"...Police visited the Upfield Bike Path at Albert Street, Brunswick one evening recently...

50 sets of lights were provided to intercepted bikes riding without lights after dark. No fines were issued..."


Moreland City News/ Moreland Leader June 3rd 2013 





                In relation to Bike Lights: Road Rule 259
cyclists’ voluntary compliance with the Road Rules and in particular Road Rule 259

affects the safety of all road users and may not satisfy a

“duty of care to ensure that reasonable action is taken to minimise the risk of harm to anyone 
who is reasonably likely to be affected by the department's activities.”


"Cyclists who break the law are much more likely to be killed or seriously injured"


Bicycle Victoria's Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria (2002)

I further argue that the Department of Justice’s
focus on cyclists’ voluntary compliance with Road Rule 259 affects the safety of all road users 

and may not satisfy a

“duty of care to ensure that reasonable action is taken to minimise the risk of harm to anyone 
who is reasonably likely to be affected by the department's activities.”



"Five cyclists killed in the last two years were riding in poor light conditions without lights or bright clothing." 


Bicycle Victoria's Report into Cycle Deaths in Victoria (2002)



I argue that the Department of Justice’s

focus on cyclists’ voluntary compliance with Road Rule 259

"Makes it easier for people to take up riding without Bike Lights"

and is in conflict with the Department of Justice,

Victoria Police Road to Zero Road Toll Campaign

I argue that compliance with the road rules is motivated by fear of detection and the likelihood of the law being enforced and that road rule compliance affects the safety of all road users.

I argue that self-regulation is motivated by the likelihood of the law being enforced.

I argue that it is inappropriate for Victoria Police Law Enforcement Officers
to hand out sets of bike lights to cyclists 

in lieu of a traffic infringement penalty 

and that this affects the safety of all road users.

I argue that in its promotion of cycling and cycling safety, 

the Road to Zero Road Toll Campaign

better road safety for all road users,

cyclists’ responsibilities and cyclists’ duty of care to themselves and other road users,


and the Victorian Government Department of Justice

“ may be found to be negligent where a failure to take reasonable care results in some injury or loss.”




Pete Dowe 
Road Safety Advocate



http://petedoweroadsafetyadvocate.blogspot.com.au/2014/05/cycling-is-way-of-future-comment-by.html



Please note re the Bike Lights Law

Road Rule 259 applies to reduced visibility not just dark

Bike Lights Law

Road Rule 259

The rider of a bicycle must not ride at night, or in hazardous weather conditions 
causing reduced visibility, 

unless the bicycle, or the rider,
displays—

(a) a flashing or steady white light 

that is clearly visible for at least
200 metres from the front of the bicycle; and

(b) a flashing or steady red light 

that is clearly visible for at least
200 metres from the rear of the bicycle; and

(c) a red reflector 

that is clearly visible for at least 50 metres
from the rear of the bicycle

when light is projected onto it by a vehicle’s headlight on low-beam


Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Beach Road Bunch Cycling VIDEO Car stuck in side street Driver Frustration Road Rule 151 Cycling Two Abreast VicRoads No Stopping Zones Corridor Strategy Community Safety




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkto3WBr7sk&list=UUK05amRifg755o30ixR7zNg



30 per cent of Cyclists Seriously Injured occurred at T intersections
in Victoria during the period June 30th 2004- June 30th 2013 according to VicRoads CrashStats


Give Way and Stop Sign Intersections accounted for 9 per cent of  Cyclists Seriously Injured

With 7 per cent of Cyclists Seriously Injured occurring at Give Way Sign Intersections


Roundabout Intersections accounted for 6 percent of Cyclists Seriously Injured



Riding two abreast

If riding in the same (lane) please consider other road users and,

if necessary, change to single file to allow drivers to overtake safely.

VicRoads




Driver and Cyclist frustration and undue risks.

Bunch sizes

Cyclists more than two abreast

The CycleSport Victoria and Amy Gillett Foundation submission to the Coroner stated:

”when cyclists breach road rules...” in particular the “…cycling specific rule of riding two abreast or three abreast when overtaking,
other road users become frustrated and take undue risks and/or show 
inappropriate aggression often to other cyclists.”


The Code of Conduct for Training Cyclists states:

“It is recommended that groups do not exceed 20 cyclists in total

as it becomes extremely difficult for other cyclists and motorists to ‘pass the bunch’.   


http://petedoweroadsafetyadvocate.blogspot.com.au/2014/06/cycling-beach-road-cycling-bayside.html

Riding two abreast

Road Rule 151: Bike riders must not ride alongside more than one other rider in a single marked lane or on any part of a road that is not a multi-lane road unless the bike rider is overtaking another bike rider.

On multi-lane roads, marked lane (and regardless of whether the road is a multi-lane road or any other sort of road), bike riders in that marked lane must not ride more than 1.5 metres apart.

Tip: When riding two abreast bike riders cannot (as stated) ride more than two abreast in any single marked lane on that road

(unless, as stated, overtaking another bike rider) but may ride more than two abreast across multiple lanes.

If riding in the same please consider other road users and, if necessary, change to single file to allow drivers to overtake safely.

VicRoads


Saturday, July 19, 2014

Community Safety Female Aggression Domestic 'Intimate Partner Violence' by Females Study finds women were ‘significantly’ more likely to be verbally and physically aggressive to men than vice versa. Daily Mail UK June 26th 2014


"Psychologists at the University of Cumbria questioned 1,104 young men and women using a scale of behaviour which ranged from shouting and insulting to pushing, beating and using weapons."


"They discovered that women were ‘significantly’ more likely to be  verbally and physically aggressive to men than vice versa. "


The analysis showed that, while women tended to be more physically aggressive towards their partners, 


men were more likely to show violence towards members of the same sex, including friends.


Dr Bates, who presented her findings at the annual meeting of  the forensic division of the British Psychological Society, in Glasgow, said:


‘It wasn’t just pushing and shoving. 

Some people were circling the boxes for things like beating up, kicking, and threatening to  use a weapon.’


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2669408/Rise-female-relationship-terrorists-Study-finds-women-controlling-aggressive-partners-men.html#ixzz37zJaIsbW 
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook



"They concluded that violence was linked to controlling behaviour such as checking up on partners and persuading them not to see certain friends."


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2669408/Rise-female-relationship-terrorists-Study-finds-women-controlling-aggressive-partners-men.html#ixzz37zJ1TUtq 
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook




  • Psychologists found more women are verbally or physically abusive to partner 

  • Within partner relationships, women are just as controlling as men 

  • It suggests 'intimate partner violence' may not be motivated by patriarchal values, as previously thought


Rise of the female 'relationship terrorists': Study finds women are more controlling and aggressive towards their partners than men


  • Psychologists found more women are verbally or physically abusive to partner 
  • Within partner relationships, women are just as controlling as men 
  • It suggests 'intimate partner violence' may not be motivated by patriarchal values, as previously thought
Troubled marriage: Nigella Lawson claimed she had been subject to 'intimate terrorism' by her ex-husband, Charles Saatchi
Troubled marriage: Nigella Lawson claimed she had been subject to 'intimate terrorism' by her ex-husband, Charles Saatchi
Convention has it that women are the gentler sex. 
But when it comes to relationships they are more likely than men to be controlling and aggressive, a study claims.
Increasing numbers of women can now be classed as ‘intimate  terrorists’, meaning that they are verbally and physically violent towards a partner.
Psychologists at the University of Cumbria questioned 1,104 young men and women using a scale of behaviour which ranged from shouting and insulting to pushing, beating and using weapons.
They discovered that women were ‘significantly’ more likely to be  verbally and physically aggressive to men than vice versa. 
They concluded that violence was linked to controlling behaviour such as checking up on partners and persuading them not to see certain friends.
The term ‘intimate terrorism’ was coined in the 1990s when US sociologist Michael P Johnson used it to define an extreme form of controlling relationship behaviour involving threats, intimidation and violence.
He said men were almost always responsible, and the phrase gained notoriety when TV cook Nigella Lawson claimed that she had been subjected to acts of ‘intimate  terrorism’ by her ex-husband, Charles Saatchi.
But the latest research turns the accepted view on its head.
Study leader Dr Elizabeth Bates said: ‘The stereotypical popular view is still one of dominant control by men. That does occur but research over the last ten to 15 years has highlighted the fact that women are controlling and aggressive in relationships too.’
She said scientists may have to think again about the reasons for male violence against women, which previous studies said arose from ‘patriarchal values’ in which men are motivated to seek to control women’s behaviour, using violence if necessary.
Previous studies have sought to explain male violence towards women (illustrated with a stock image) as rising from patriarchal values, which motivate men to control women's behaviour, using violence if necessary
Previous studies have sought to explain male violence towards women (illustrated with a stock image) as rising from patriarchal values, which motivate men to control women's behaviour, using violence if necessary
She said other research also looked at men in prisons and women in refuges, rather than  typical members of the public.
The study team were surprised at the level of violence shown by some women, revealed in answers to an anonymous questionnaire.
Dr Bates, who presented her findings at the annual meeting of  the forensic division of the British Psychological Society, in Glasgow, said: ‘It wasn’t just pushing and shoving. Some people were circling the boxes for things like beating up, kicking, and threatening to  use a weapon.’
She added men may be starting to report the issue more often. ‘A contributing factor could be that in the past women have talked about it more,’ she said. ‘The feminist movement made violence towards women something we talk about.
‘Now there is more support for men and more of them are feeling comfortable coming forward.’
The analysis showed that, while women tended to be more physically aggressive towards their partners, men were more likely to show violence towards members of the same sex, including friends.

AND MEN WITH WIDER SKULLS ARE SEEN AS MORE DOMINANT

Men with narrower skulls are less likely to be regarded as more dominant than those with wider ones, a study has found.
Psychologists from Stirling University asked volunteers to look at photographs of students with neutral expressions and rate the dominance of their personality.
The research revealed a strong link between the breadth of a man’s face compared to its height - known as fWHR - and how dominant he was considered by himself and others. The same could not be said of women.
The study’s lead author Viktoria Mileva said that others’ perception of men with broad faces could lead them to believe they are dominant.
She said: ‘It is also possible that men with a higher width to height ratio act inherently more dominant, perhaps as a result of increased testosterone.’
'One potential mechanism which may explain why fWHR affects male self-perceptions of dominance is how others behave towards them.
‘If certain behavioural qualities which signal dominance, such as achievement drive, aggression and cheating and trustworthiness are visible in people’s faces through their fWHR, as our study one suggests, then actions towards these individuals may differ.
‘This could in turn lead to altered behaviour from the faces’ owners in response to how they are treated by others.
‘However, it is also possible that men with a higher fWHR act and feel inherently more dominant, perhaps as a result of increased testosterone’.
Previous studies have found that men with wider faces are more likely to be seen as aggressive, but also more attractive for short-term relationships.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2669408/Rise-female-relationship-terrorists-Study-finds-women-controlling-aggressive-partners-men.html#ixzz37z86QBgw
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2669408/Rise-female-relationship-terrorists-Study-finds-women-controlling-aggressive-partners-men.html