Sunday, July 15, 2018

Community Safety Cyber Bullying Social Aggression ''The Lasting Damage of Cyberbullying'' Ditta M. Oliker Ph.D ''...the Internet, email, cell phones, Facebook, and Twitter – all of which then alters the actual destructive psychological and social experiencing of being bullied to one of being stalked.’’



''the Internet, email, cell phones, Facebook, and Twitter – all of which then alters the actual destructive psychological and social experiencing of being bullied to one of being stalked.’’




The Lasting Damage of Cyberbullying

‘’The act of “cyberbullying” holds a strange paradox for me; it is an act that can be devoid of any direct social connection and yet, because of the technology and social media sites it uses, it can be hyper-social. For an adolescent, this can be particularly damaging since it can permeate and distort every aspect of a teenager’s social life, at a stage in life when peer relationships are so vitally important.’’

‘’It may be time to change how we refer to what is now called “cyberbullying” — aggression via the internet — to capture more effectively its lasting damage. Included in its meaning must be the power of the aggressive content (what the words say, or the image depicts) further enhanced by the power of the various media available to conveying the content – the Internet, email, cell phones, Facebook, and Twitter – all of which then alters the actual destructive psychological and social experiencing of being bullied to one of being stalked.’’



''...the effects of social aggression can be longer lasting and more damaging than physical aggression.  Since the "weapons" have a stealth nature to them, there is less possibility of anticipating the specifics of an attack and fewer actions to defend against an attack.''

‘’A recent development in social aggression is cyber bullying, acted out by both sexes.  


In this type of aggression, the perpetrator uses social networking tools - email, Facebook, Twitter - to inflict damage, particularly the spreading of socially harmful rumors of others.  Recent reports of several suicides by young adolescents who were targeted speak to the damaging power of this kind of aggression.’’

Ditta Oliker

The Lasting Damage of Cyberbullying

Posted on March 14, 2013 by crpmaster

The act of “cyberbullying” holds a strange paradox for me; it is an act that can be devoid of any direct social connection and yet, because of the technology and social media sites it uses, it can be hyper-social. For an adolescent, this can be particularly damaging since it can permeate and distort every aspect of a teenager’s social life, at a stage in life when peer relationships are so vitally important.
As I wrote in my last blog, aggression was, until fairly recently, the domain of the male and “bullying” was synonymous with a young male who was physically aggressive. The word “bully” is usually associated with male actions, not female ones.Social or relational aggression — ignoring, teasing, gossiping, excluding, secrets, backstabbing, and rumor spreading — now associated with the female, stayed under the radar of study, with the aggressive behavior often wrapped in a package seen as harmless, or just a “girl thing”. What was most damaging was turning the victim into a social “undesirable” and that the covert nature of the aggression left the victim with no forum to refute the accusations.
“Cyberbullying” takes the covert and hidden even further, allowing the perpetrator a greater opportunity to remain anonymous, leaving the victim even less of a chance to refute or avoid the damage of the accusations. The term has generally been defined as using the power of the Internet – emails, chat rooms, instant messaging and social networking sites, as well as cell phones — to send or post text or images meant to hurt, embarrass and humiliate another person.It can include threats, harassment, stalking, impersonation, trickery and exclusion. Both perpetrators and victims can be male or female and are usually older adolescents. In an interesting twist, when adults perpetrate similar aggressive behavior using the Internet, it is generally called cyberstalking.
When bullying was limited to physical or social aggression between perpetrator and victim, there usually was some direct contact between them, although it was limited to shared meeting places, like school or clubs. A safe haven would be any place that would offer an environment free of one’s peers, i.e. home. The special aspect of “cyberbullying” that is particularly damaging for a young person is the void of a safe haven away from it; for as long as a young person has a cell phone and Internet access, the borderless nature of cyber communications permeates all spaces he or she exists within, with the negative messages continuing to bombard the psyche.
All these aspects combine to create a situation for the young person that is physically, emotionally and socially damaging. If the victim attempts to fight back, the perpetrator increases the “I’m going to get you” attacks, forcing a state of resignation. The bullying also has a reputational effect so that the stigmatization endures even after the actual bullying has stopped. The distortions and lies that get bonded to one’s reputation become internalized, leading to feelings of hopelessness and despair. It is these feelings that can lead a young victim to decide that life is not worth living.
It may be time to change how we refer to what is now called “cyberbullying” — aggression via the internet — to capture more effectively its lasting damage. Included in its meaning must be the power of the aggressive content (what the words say, or the image depicts) further enhanced by the power of the various media available to conveying the content – the Internet, email, cell phones, Facebook, and Twitter – all of which then alters the actual destructive psychological and social experiencing of being bullied to one of being stalked.
The post was written by Ditta Oliker, author of the book THE LIGHT SIDE OF THE MOON
The post was written by Ditta Oliker, author of the book, The Light Side of the Moon – Reclaiming Your Lost Potential.


Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Community Safety Female Aggression Bullying Covert Bullying 'Bullying in the Female World' Psychology Today Ditta M. Oliker Ph.D Sept. 3rd 2011 Cyber Bullying Stalking Surveillance Vigilantism Hyper Vigilantism Social Aggression Social Knowledge Rumour Spread


















"Until fairly recently, there were no sounds associated with female aggression -- as if it didn't exist.



It's only in the last decade or so that aggression by the female -- in the form of social or relational aggression -- has been recognized.




 The words now associated with female aggressive behavior include: 


excluding, ignoring, teasing, gossiping, secrets, backstabbing, rumor spreading and hostile body language (i.e., eye-rolling and smirking).  




Most damaging is turning the victim into a social "undesirable". 






The behavior and associated anger is hidden, often wrapped in a package seen as somewhat harmless or just a "girl thing".  



The covert nature of the aggression leaves the victim with no forum to refute the accusations 





and, in fact, attempts to defend oneself leads to an escalation of the aggression."










With the growing data indicating that, for both boys and girls, 

covert forms of bullying are likely to ‘cause the greatest amount of suffering, 

while they have a greater chance of going unnoticed by teachers’ [122], 



it is clear that the old saying 

‘sticks and stones may break my bones, but names will never harm me’ 

is not only inaccurate, but is also dangerous 

in that it has marginalised the importance of covert bullying 

in the context of school bullying policy and teacher awareness. 



Edith Cowan University 2009








Bullying in the Female World

The Hidden Aggression Behind the Innocent Smile 

Post published by Ditta M. Oliker Ph.D. on Sep 03, 2011 in The Long Reach of Childhood

"Kick him where it hurts" - "Punch him harder" - "Pin him down till he yells uncle".  These are some of the sounds associated with male aggression.  In fact, the word aggression was only applied to the males of our species, expressed in physical action and captured in words like hitting, pushing, punching, beating and ganging-up.  Included in any description was angerthat seemed to be the force behind the aggressive act. 

Until fairly recently, there were no sounds associated with female aggression -- as if it didn't exist.




https://cdn.psychologytoday.com/sites/default/files/styles/article-inline-half/public/blogs/49297/2011/09/73497-63976.jpg?itok=2QMY6_vQ



It's only in the last decade or so that aggression by the female -- in the form of social or relational aggression -- has been recognized.

What made me think of this was watching the film The Help based on the novel by Kathryn Stockett, now a popular new movie.  It is the story of life in Mississippi in the early 1960's and how a group of affluent White women relate to the Black maids who care for them and their children and how, in turn, the maids feel about how they are being treated.  It dramatically captures the distance between the two groups and the underlying racial biases of that time.
What struck me as I was watching the film is how it also dramatically and effectively captures the emotional and psychological violence of social aggression, including the sting and cruelty of the verbal "weapons" women use. The words now associated with female aggressive behavior include: excluding, ignoring, teasing, gossiping, secrets, backstabbing, rumor spreading and hostile body language (i.e., eye-rolling and smirking).  Most damaging is turning the victim into a social "undesirable".  The behavior and associated anger is hidden, often wrapped in a package seen as somewhat harmless or just a "girl thing".  The covert nature of the aggression leaves the victim with no forum to refute the accusations and, in fact, attempts to defend oneself leads to an escalation of the aggression.  The film captures a number of these "weapons" as well as a pattern found in the interactions of males; the justification for the use of the same kind of aggression -- physical or social -- by the "good guy" in response to the original aggression by the "bad guy".
Comparison between male and female aggression shows strong and obvious similarities.  Motivation for both groups usually includes: a desire for power, for control, for achieving greater social status and popularity, jealousyfear and derailing competition.  Aggressive behavior for both male and female children can be found as early as preschool age, is most prevalent in adolescence and can, as the movie so clearly illustrates, continue well into adulthood.  Both sexes form social structures that lead different members to assume specific roles and characteristics.  For example, in a female group (as seen in the movie) the one with the power is like the "Queen Bee" with a contingent of followers.  Her friends do what she wants, she is charming when she wants to be, she's manipulatively affectionate, she takes no responsibility for hurting another's feelings, and defines right and wrong by the loyalty or disloyalty shown to her. She is usually the one who decides who should be the victim.  The film also captures the dilemma of those who feel helpless to help the victim because of their need to not stir the anger of the Queen Bee and become alienated from the group.
What the film doesn't show is that the effects of social aggression can be longer lasting and more damaging than physical aggression.  Since the "weapons" have a stealth nature to them, there is less possibility of anticipating the specifics of an attack and fewer actions to defend against an attack.  This negative effect is particularly damaging during adolescence when the importance of acceptance in a peer group is maximized.  Adding to the pain inflicted on the victim is the lack of support by teachers and other adults who view the bully -- often a popular and charismatic young woman -- as innocent of such negative behavior.  Thus the strong positive reputation of the bully makes it difficult for a victim to get validation of the bullying and causes a victim to suffer the additional pain of not being believed and not getting any support.
Relational aggression negatively impacts "mirroring" - a peer group's reflected reaction to an individual.  Caught in the web of punishing aggression by peers, a young person's internal sense of self becomes diminished and felt as being "a loser" - "a reject" and "not as good".  Self-esteem is low and feelings of insecurity may persist throughout life.  What is also affected is the ability to trust as an adult and to be free to be open to close relationships. 
A recent development in social aggression is cyber bullying, acted out by both sexes.  In this type of aggression, the perpetrator uses social networking tools - email, Facebook, Twitter - to inflict damage, particularly the spreading of socially harmful rumors of others.  Recent reports of several suicides by young adolescents who were targeted speak to the damaging power of this kind of aggression. I'll write more extensively about the increasing prevalence and deadly effects of cyber bullying in my next blog.
I was also aware, watching this film, of how new technologies have changed our world.  In the 1960's the nature and power of relational aggression was more muted because these new stealth weapons did not yet exist.  The Help ends on a positive note, in some ways mirroring the positive changes in race relationships since the 1960's and the civil rights movement.  It may be time, with the power of the internet being used as a powerful weapon of covert aggression, to start a movement to change the nature of human relationships as they relate to both physical and social aggression.
This blog will continue to expand on The Long Reach of Childhood: How Early Experiences Shape You Forever including offering more information on relational aggression, a greater understanding of why someone becomes a bully and strategies that can play a part in lessening its power.  Hope you'll continue to join me on this journey.  And hope your interactions are free of both social and physical aggression.



Monday, June 25, 2018

Community Safety Murder Public Sphere Violence Random Attack ''Melbourne streets are not safe for women'' Herald Sun June 14, 2018


I'll probably be howled down as this is a shocking tragedy no doubt though I don't agree with the headline and the headline encourages fear of crime. Sexual assaults by strangers are rare. The three Melbourne women cited were young and were raped and murdered by a male stranger in public in Melbourne over a five year period. Three young Melburnian women in a city of 4 million in five years is three too many and also rare. It ought to have been rarer as Adrian Bayley shouldn't have gotten parole and Sean Price shouldn't have gotten bail. You cannot justify fear of crime as an inner city or Melbourne fear. Hypervigilance is now in rural Victoria ''The streets of (name a Victorian Rural Town) are not safe for women?'' What good does panic do? Susie you have just decreed that Melbourne isn’t safe for women and ok your article is for a tabloid newspaper

Ps Susie, I commend you on your writings on the problem of vigilantes targeting Fathers and Grandfathers with their kids/ grandkids as fear of crime stranger danger. Why then crank up the panic here? You don’t think vigilantes will target males? You don’t think they already do?

Pete Dowe



Susie O’Brien: Melbourne streets are not safe for women
Susie O’Brien, Herald Sun
June 14, 2018 7:09pm
Subscriber only


· 
· 
·  THE death of Eurydice Dixon is a reminder that we live in a city divided.
Melbourne isn’t a safe place after dark for women. Our city’s streets contain additional threats for women than men.
Ms Dixon was young, fit and savvy.


https://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/b76b62fd8d23859cc8f2274af878653b?width=316Eurydice Dixon was a comedian.
She’d finished work at 10.30pm in a crowded public place in the heart of the city. She was on her way home, presumably triumphant about her successful performance at the Highlander Bar.
She should have been safe. And yet some time around 11pm she was attacked, raped and killed.
She never made it home.
Her body was found three hours later, abandoned on a dark soccer pitch in the middle of a popular park.


https://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/9a8f9c99684829d1ea7e56531e04feee?width=316Jaymes Todd is accused of Ms Dixon’s murder.
It’s a chilling reminder of women’s vulnerability in public places after dark. It’s two years after Masa Vukotic was stabbed in Doncasterin a random evening attack and six years after the death of Jill Meagher on the streets of Brunswick.
Ms Dixon was 22; her life was just beginning. She should not be dead.
What she went through in her final moments doesn’t bear thinking about.
At this stage it appears to have been a crime of opportunity; the man arrested for her rape and murder isn’t thought to be known to her personally.
It could have been any of the thousands of bright young women making their way around the city at night.
Alarmingly, Ms Dixon’s death comes as sexual crimes continue to rise. The latest Victorian crime statistics show sexual offences up 13.4 per cent, from 7493 to 8495. In some areas the rise is even greater: in Geelong it’s up an astonishing 41.6 per cent.
Some — but not all — of this increase is down to a new sexual offences code. So what’s going on?
According to the Centre for Sexual Assault, 17 per cent of women and four per cent of men experience sexual assault over the age of 15.
ABS figures show 93 per cent of offenders are male and that only 17 per cent of sexual assaults result in a conviction. Police data states girls between the ages of 10 and 14 are the greatest proportion of victims, and young women aged between 15 and 24 are the second largest category.
The tragical, brutal and untimely end to Ms Dixon’s life shows more must be done to keep our streets safe, not only for women but all Victorians.


· 
· 
· 






Saturday, June 23, 2018

Community Safety Murder Public Sphere Violence Random Attack Melbourne Protective Service Officer (PSO) patrols proposed after murder of comedian Eurydice Dixon Sunday Herald Sun June 16, 2018


“We want to emphasise that women should have the right to walk where they want when they want,” Audrey Arjoune, one of the organisers, said.

And so should Men

Pete Dowe


I support this ''Police, government and councils will discuss whether Protective Service Officers should be moved to crime hot spots as well as patrolling public transport.''
Evenhanded Just Authority
Better to have authority than vigilantes 
I believe we are yet to address community safety and so far have simply enabled and empowered bullies and bullying.

Pete Dowe

I'll probably be howled down as this is a shocking tragedy no doubt though I don't agree with the headline that Melbourne streets are not safe for women and the headline encourages fear of crime. Sexual assaults by strangers are rare. The three Melbourne women cited were young and were raped and murdered by a male stranger in public in Melbourne over a five year period. 
Three young Melburnian females in a city of 4 million in five years is three too many and also rare. 
It ought to have been rarer as Adrian Bayley shouldn't have gotten parole and Sean Price shouldn't have gotten bail. 
You cannot justify fear of crime as an inner city or Melbourne fear. Hypervigilance is now in rural Victoria ''The streets of (name a Victorian Rural Town) are not safe for women?'' 
What good does panic do? 
Susie you have just decreed that Melbourne isn’t safe for women and ok your article is for a tabloid newspaper

Pete Dowe




So often the bond, the reaction to tragedy is #vigilantism, text group #surveillance, smartphone surveillance apps, #socialmedia photos distributed all denying the target their side of the story. 
Authorities do not do this. 
Vigilantism is legitimised #bullying. 
It is entry-level pseudo community service aka #criminal #cyberbullying

PS If the vigil was organised by text group, the same network may be used for vigilantism.

In 2009 most #schoolbullying was text and text group yet the community doesn't know what bullying is even though it says it says No to bullying

Pete Dowe





An example of so-called "social media savvy" the two Jill Meagher marches had no objective did not advocate to the authorities made a NO statement to rape and murder and violence against women. Wow. There is no YES case.
I believe those marches in the absence of any goals degenerated into vigilantism and lynch mob mentality. Why?
Because they can. Because #vigilantism is "social media savvy"
Because vigilantism is entry level ''community service'' with little effort nor commitment.
Except vigilantism is not a community service but is dressed up as one

Let's not forget the "good people" lynch-mob blamed Tom Meagher on assumption and profiling until Adrian Bayley was caught.
The “good people’’ did that to a Man whose wife had just been murdered!








Protective Service Officer patrols proposed after murder of comedian Eurydice Dixon
Ashley Argoon, Rebekah Cavanagh and Anthony Dowsley, Sunday Herald Sun
June 16, 2018 9:56pm
Subscriber only





· 
· 
· 
A SWEEPING review of security across Melbourne will be launched after the murder of comedian Eurydice Dixon.
Authorities will hold a meeting tomorrow to assess the city’s crime hot spots, police resources and the amount of CCTV and lighting.
Police, government and councils will discuss whether Protective Service Officers should be moved to crime hot spots as well as patrolling public transport.
The meeting will be held on the same day as a public vigil for Ms Dixon, 22, at Princes Park in Carlton North, where she was found dead on Wednesday morning.
Yesterday her dad Jeremy expressed his gratitude, saying in a statement: “Eurydice’s immediate family very much ­appreciate the community support shown for Eurydice and the positive coverage about her.”





https://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/2d0bff5b36ac1c4647309ceeb0f68db9?width=650Floral tributes gather at the Carlton North field. Pictures: Wayne Taylor
Jaymes Todd, 19, has been charged with her rape and murder.
Lord Mayor Sally Capp said it was “important we review and act” in the wake of an “extreme act of violence”.
“I think the first step has to be to get the right parties together,” she said.
“We need to make sure we respond appropriately, and responding in a kneejerk way isn’t necessarily a good thing either. We (previously) installed 37 LED lights around that Princes Park zone, but there are more to come — they are more powerful and more effective.
“We’re talking about police presence — PSOs are very focused on transport, I think we’ll have a broader con­versation on whether PSOs can be extended into crime hot spots.”
Premier Daniel Andrews said the “tragic and shocking incident again shows that violence against women is all too real”.





https://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/9d9922d8b5365bfcbb860360d4c658b1?width=650After playing a match nearby, footballers from Melbourne University Blacks and St Bernards walked over to pay their respects to Eurydice Dixon. Picture: Wayne Taylor
“That’s why we have a comprehensive plan that leads our nation in its scale and innovation to change attitudes and, therefore, behaviour,” Mr Andrews said.
That includes a Bill to be introduced this week to form a new agency, Respect Victoria, to stop family violence.
At Princes Park last night, a ring of floral tributes continued to grow as mourners ignored the cold and rain to pay their respects.
Footballers from the University Blacks and St Bernards formed a circle of solidarity at the scene to pay their respects, saying men’s attitudes had to change.
The teams had just finished a match on a nearby field when they, along with their coaches, walked to the floral tribute after the siren sounded.
Josh Bowden, 27, from the Uni Blacks, said many players had been deeply affected.
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Footballers pay tribute to comedian found dead in a Melbourne soccer field
“It was quite telling that on Thursday night a lot of blokes talked about it at training,” he said.
Mr Bowden had one message to men: “It’s pretty simple: it’s just not good enough. We need to change.”
Tomorrow night’s vigil is expected to draw thousands of people to Carlton North to remember the life of the talented 22-year-old.
“We want to emphasise that women should have the right to walk where they want when they want,” Audrey Arjoune, one of the organisers, said.
The family of Ms Dixon has put their support behind the cause but said they do not want the service to become aggressive.
The Reclaim Princes Park vigil will be held from 5.30pm tomorrow, with more than 7700 Melburnians indicating they will attend.
ashley.argoon@news.com.au